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Stephen Jay Gould
Stephen Jay Gould (1941-2002) was the Alexander Agassiz Professor of Zoology and Professor of Geology at Harvard University. He published over twenty books, received the National Book and National Book Critics Circle Awards, and a MacArthur Fellowship. show more



Stephen Jay Gould (1941-2002) was the Alexander Agassiz Professor of Zoology and Professor of Geology at Harvard University. He published over twenty books, received the National Book and National Book Critics Circle Awards, and a MacArthur Fellowship.

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Birth date: September 10, 1941
Died: May 20, 2002
Category:
Nonfiction, Science
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Community Reviews
iamapenguin
iamapenguin rated it 5 years ago
Life's Grandeur has echoed through my thinking since I originally read it. As an Australian and a cricket fan, I found the baseball chapters wearisome, to the point of giving up the book at one stage.I'm better off for having finished it though. Gould nails one point in particular: that evolution ...
KizunaYueMichaelis
KizunaYueMichaelis rated it 5 years ago
Pilot and Ep. 1 of Season 1 are almost the same. I watched Ep. 1 twice, so I watched it 3 times in total. So I can safely say that this volume is exactly like Ep. 1; word by word, frame by frame. The drawing is pretty much like the real thing...except for Watson. I don't know why but in this version...
Elentarri's Book Blog
Elentarri's Book Blog rated it 6 years ago
This was an impulse buy because I had heard so many wonderful things about this book. But...well... I found it rather disappointing.There are ridiculous amount of irrelevant waffling and personal commentary at the beginning and end of the book that makes the reading experience a bore. The book get...
Domhnall
Domhnall rated it 6 years ago
This book sets out a case for the notion of "non overlapping magisteria" or NOMA, to insist that religion should stay out of science, science stay out of religion, but both engage in constructive interactions. There is no reason not to give full respect to both, each in their proper domain or "mag...
Tolle Lege!.
Tolle Lege!. rated it 7 years ago
The book's theme is Science and Religion have non overlapping domains, Science can't give ethical and moral truths and that religion should be respected when it stays within it's own domain. I'm glad this book is not influential today. When it was written (in 1998 according to the book itself) mar...
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