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text 2017-08-18 10:43
More Bingo Choices
The Day of the Triffids - John Wyndham
The Abyss Above Us - Ryan Notch
Stalking Jack - Madison Kent
Faust - Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,Walter Kaufmann
The Elementals - Michael Rowe,Michael McDowell
Vampire - In the Beginning - Charmain Marie Mitchell
Demon Lord - T.C. Southwell
Goblins - David Bernstein
Circus of Horrors - Carole Gill
The Thin Man - Dashiell Hammett

Well, I went through my A-list and B-list and snagged one free book off Amazon, so now my list if full! I also made another change for Classic Noir so I could participate in the group read.

 

So, here is my list now! Still subject to changes if I start to read something and decide it's a waste of my time. Only one re-read this year! I think I kept it down to two last year.

 

Classic noir: The Thin Man by Dashiel Hammett

 

Amateur sleuth: this mystery will have a main character who is not a member of law enforcement. A Spark of Justice by J.D. Hawkins re-read

 

Serial/spree killer: Normally this would have been first on my exclusions, but I've been wanting to read Cabal by Clive Barker

 

American horror story: Children of Chaos by Greg Gifune

 

Genre: horror: The Day of the Triffids by John Wyndham

 

Gothic: Unnatural Creatures by Neil Gaiman

 

Darkest London: Stalking Jack by Madison Kent

 

Modern Masters of Horror: Helltown by Jeremy Bates

 

Supernatural: Faust by Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe

 

Ghost: The Ghost of Guir House by Charles Willing Beale

 

Haunted houses: The Elementals by Michael McDowell

 

Vampires: Vampire - In the Beginning by Charmain Marie Mitchell

 

Werewolves: The Werewolf Whisperer by Camilla Ochlan and Bonita Gutierez

 

Witches: The Witching Hour by Anne Rice

 

Demons: Demon Lord by T.C. Southwell

 

Classic horror: I've read rather a lot of these since last year! But I found one I haven't yet read, The Monk by Matthew Lewis

 

Chilling children: The Doll by J.C. Martin

 

Monsters: Dead Sea by Tim Curran

 

80's horror: Faerie Tale by Raymond Feist

 

In the dark, dark woods: Into the Woods by Thomas Washburn Jr

 

Terror in a small town: Goblins by David Bernstein

 

Magical realism: Foxglove Summer by Ben Aaronovitch

 

Terrifying women: Circus of Horrors by Carol Gill

 

Diverse voices: One Blood by Qwantu Amaru

 

Free square: The Abyss Above Us by Ryan Notch

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review 2017-05-20 05:26
Above the Paw (Paw Enforcement, #5)
Above the Paw - Diane Kelly

Another so-so entry.  Kelly has the plotting down pat, but she struggles with the amount of research to share with her reader; even when it's interesting stuff, it's over-bearing.

 

Megan and Brigit go undercover at a local University to try to break up an ecstasy dealing ring.  Kelly writes this series from multiple POV: Megan's, Brigit's (which is, thankfully, usually only a paragraph or two, because there's only so much doggy POV a reader can take) and the villain's.  She does a bit of slight-of-hand with the villain's POV here and I'm not sure it totally worked.  It did obfuscate things nicely, but she failed to tie it all together in any satisfying way.  

 

It was a good enough read to hold my attention but not quite strong enough to suck me in.  I'd read another one happily, but I won't wait on the edge of my seat for it.


 

 

 

Total pages: 370

$$:  $3.00

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review 2017-04-19 14:59
Claiming Her Alien Warrior (Warriors of the Lathar, #4) by Mina Carter Review
Claiming Her Alien Warrior: Sci-fi Alien Warriors Invasion Romance (Warriors of the Lathar Book 4) - Mina Carter

In a race against the clock, she must betray his trust to achieve her mission… But fooling an alien warrior comes with a price.

No longer a captive but a guest of the alien warrior race, the Lathar, Jane Allen hasn’t forgotten what she is: a hard as nails marine major. Tasked with finding a way to beat the technologically advanced aliens, she needs to find answers for her superiors… before they arm the nukes and give the Lathar an excuse for war. Because the little green men aren’t so little. Or green… they’re large, ripped, scarily-attractive alpha male warriors hot enough to make any red-blooded woman weak at the knees. Especially one particular alien warrior with black hair and a sexy growl she can’t resist…

She’s his… she just doesn’t know it yet.

Karryl K’Vass has wanted the human woman, Jane, from the moment he saw her. But she’s a tricky one, evading his claim even though he knows she desires him. His campaign for her heart is stalled when duty calls him away; a mission into a dangerous part of space to gather intelligence on the Empire’s enemies. A beautiful stowaway is the last thing he needs, even if she does make his body burn. He’ll finish his mission and get her back to the safety of Lathar Prime… Then maybe he can claim her as his mate.

But no plan survives contact with the enemy. Reptilian mercenaries, a crash landing, and a case of amnesia later and they land in the clutches of their enemies who think it would be better if Karryl took a long walk out of a short airlock…

 

 

Review

Yea! A full length book! The heroine is a seasoned marine and isn't 20. I love her. I love this romance as the hero and the heroine become partners and respect, like, and have the hots for each other.

 

The world building is good. Very fun.

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review 2017-03-31 17:44
Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey - William Wordsworth  
Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey - William Wordsworth

6 June, 1982

Read for AP English. I rather like Wordsworth, even though I'm not a huge poetry fan.

 

Norton Anthology of English Literature Volume II, which I have kept

***

31 March, 2017

Reread today because it came to my attention. Thirty-five years on, I'm not the same person who read it then. Now I have a daughter in her own senior year of high school. It seems an unbelievable length of time, and yet, hardly any. The math is accurate. But thirty-five years since I graduated high school? And here I am, full circle, worrying about Russia and nuclear war, and the Berlin Wall is now a piece of rubble in that part of the kitchen where strange things show up from time to time. Inconceivable.

I don't share Wordsworth's delight in the countryside in general, although I did find delight in standing outside just now, after the rain, looking for a rainbow. Still I think I get some of what he was trying to say. None of the people who were with me in that last year are near me now, although I suppose I could connect with them all on FaceBook, well, except my parents, who have both died. But I think I get the point he was making about being able to return to a place after whatever changes I've been through, and to feel again the same kinds of sensations. The place I return to isn't a scenic walk in the mountains at the Borders, it's a text, which is the only permanence I know.

There are only two kinds of poetry I care for, still: light verse which amuses and delights Old Possum's Book never gets old to me, nor The Jabberwocky, and poetry like this, that gets at the feelings. I suppose it is the same way I feel about music, that it is an easy and reliable way into a particular emotion.

None of this sheds any light on Wordsworth's poem, and my AP English teacher wouldn't have accepted a paper like this, but this is what reading is for me: a way to share emotions with other people across space and time, or even just with myself. An emotional time machine. I think he'd understand that.

 

Free copy from Project Gutenberg

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review 2017-03-29 22:50
Ten Thousand Skies Above You
Ten Thousand Skies Above You (Firebird) - Claudia Gray

I absolutely loved the first novel in this series, A Thousand Pieces of You, and this book was just as good.  The story is woven throughout the multiverse as Marguerite fights to save both Paul and Theo.  And like the first book, this one makes you think about life, choices, and their unforeseen ramifications.

 

The events of the first novel changed Marguerite, changed her perspective on life and her beliefs about it.  Travelling through the multiverse and seeing the "what if's" has opened her eyes to how different choices can lead to vastly different lives.  But those beliefs get tested yet again as she travels through more dimensions and finds unexpected versions of the people she loves.  Those versions make her question everything.

 

And much like the first novel, the lines between good and evil are often blurred.  Whose intentions are good, causing them to do questionable things?  Whose intentions are just plain evil?  It is this kind of gray area that makes this such a thought-provoking series.  How far would you go to save the ones you love?  How far is too far?  Is there such a thing as too far?  These are just some of the questions that Marguerite has to answer.

 

The dimensions exist during the same period of time, but it is fascinating to see the different ways in which they have evolved.  To think about what that means, in terms of multiverse theory, is incredible.  The Russiaverse, a throwback in time.  The Home Office, a vision of the future.  The New York-verse, an alternate reality.  Each dimension has different versions of our characters, making them all ever more complex.

 

The story and its premise are, simply put, fascinating!  I couldn't recommend this more!

Source: thecaffeinateddivareads.multifacetedmama.com/?p=12862
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