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Search tags: American-Novel
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text 2017-07-20 22:48
Reading progress update: I've read 350 out of 750 pages.
American Gods: A Novel - Neil Gaiman

Not going to lie, it's hard to read this one in small doses. I wish I had several hours to just sit and read but I don't. I keep having to backtrack and remind myself what's going on with the characters, but at least I'm making some progress. At this rate I should be finished by Christmas. ohy. 

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text 2017-06-23 13:05
Reading progress update: I've read 250 out of 750 pages.
American Gods: A Novel - Neil Gaiman

There are definitely some.....unexpected....encounters so far. Everything still feels separated so I'm hoping the characters start to feel more connected soon.

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text 2017-05-31 18:18
May wrap up
Whispers Under Ground - Ben Aaronovitch
Moon Over Soho - Ben Aaronovitch
American Gods: A Novel - Neil Gaiman

Three books finished this month. I'm obviously working too much and don't have enough reading time. How do some of you do it?

 

I've been working my way through the Rivers of London series because I have book 7 from Netgalley to read and review. I'm more than half through book 4 now. I do have book 5 on my Kindle, but unless someone tells me there are major spoilers I'm going to read book 7 next. I seem to have collected 3 Netgalley books again and am waiting to hear on one more... oops!

 

The samples collection has plummeted this month! I'm down to 32 despite new acquisitions! If I keep this up, I'll have it cleared by end of June and can start vetting those gazillion free books!

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review 2017-05-26 18:31
American Gods by Neil Gaiman
American Gods: A Novel - Neil Gaiman

First, a confession. I confess that I am shamelessly in love with Neil Gaiman. If you are worried that this will sully my unbiased review of this book, worry not. In fact, this was my second read through of American Gods and, truth be told, I wasn't all that in love with it the first time I read it. Maybe it was where I was at in my life, or the current reading mood I had, but despite my love for Gaiman this book and I just didn't click. So, when I was offered the Author's Preferred Text version for review, I was eager to give it another chance. Oh, I am so glad I did. So, so very glad. This book is an experience. Brutal at times, beautiful at others, and full of things that will have you questioning reality. In other words, it's Gaiman. At his finest. I don't know why I ever thought otherwise.

Shadow's journey is a strange, and fascinating one. Whether you're familiar with the Norse Gods or not, Shadow will always be there to stumble right along with you. Here's the thing though, Shadow is infinitely more steady than I expected him to be. He's a character who, despite having done things in the past that he regrets, still believes in the inherent good in people. He walks around partially blinded to the world that he's found himself wrapped up in, and yet he never seems inept. I loved Shadow. Every single messy part of him. The book is long, this is true, but with Shadow as my guide I didn't mind one bit.

Then there are the Gods themselves that slither, flap and saunter through this book as if they own every page. Gaiman's broken world pits the Gods of old against the Gods of new. Odin and Bast against the manifested Gods of technology and progress. It's an intriguing premise. If a God is birthed and sustained through worship, why wouldn't we have birthed new ones that relate to cell phones, internet and music? Simply fascinating. What's more interesting than that though, is all of the underlying lore that is penned into these pages. Stories of Thunderbirds, coins that bring back the dead, and areas that shouldn't exist but do. It's so easy to lose your footing in reality and go crashing, right along with Shadow, into this world.

In an effort not to endlessly ramble on, let me assure you that this book easily made my favorites shelf this time around. As I mentioned, this is the Author's Preferred Text version, and actually contains quite a bit of content that was originally cut out. I think it's perfect. The story, the extras, the whole package is perfect. Pick this up! You won't believe how easily you can get lost in Gaiman's world. American Gods is well worth your time.

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review 2017-04-30 21:35
OTT, but Uber Cool!
Iceberg - Clive Cussler

There was a time when Dirk Pitt was one of my favourite fictional heroes and Clive Cussler the master at placing his creation in the most intriguing of plot-lines. Who can forget, "Raise the Titanic" (1976), which brought the world's attention to the 'National Underwater & Marine Agency' (NUMA), led by the phlegmatic Admiral Sandecker and his resourceful, but unruly director of operations. The echoes of James Bond are unmistakable, yet the brand of Dirk Pitt novels has also been synonymous with raucous adventure, just without the accompanying blockbuster movie franchise (a couple of spin-off movies have not remotely done justice to the original Cussler books). Not that comparative failure at the box office should diminish the written word, wherein the author has retained a solid readership.In fact, "Iceberg" (1975) preceded Mr Cussler's seminal novel and clearly Dirk Pitt and his crew received further polish, but the familiar format is established here.

 

Based on an unlikely, though plausibly fascinating premise, Cussler nurtures the reader's curiosity, suspends incredulity and weaves a spectacular tale of against-the-odds triumph of good over evil. The Bond-esque one-liners, the steely-eyed propensity for violence, Pitt's gritty good looks and predictable womanizing gives a rather dated feel to the macho hero. Still, the OTT, unreal nature of the characters and the plot are perhaps just necessary components of the genre's worship of unadulterated escapism. Whatever the flaws, it's a fast-moving yarn that in the past might have been described as 'swashbuckling' and the protagonists get the appropriate comeuppance!

 

Sadly the thrill I experienced following Dirk Pitt as a teenage reader, isn't so vivid today, but perhaps, just as beauty is in the eye of the beholder, emotional grip is very much in the mind of the reader. Unlike DP, I have got older!

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