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text 2017-08-16 12:53
Synthetic Biology Market - Global Industry Insights, Trends,and Opportunity Analysis, 2016-2024

Synthetic biology is a combination of biology and biomedical engineering principles that favors designing and construction of novel biological parts & systems and also the reconstruction of preexisting designs according to specific application requirements. Synthetic biology is extensively used in the field of medical and pharmaceuticals to produce and manufacture improved biological drugs and systems to meet various challenges in the healthcare sector. Synthetic biology offers various opportunities in the field of healthcare such as recreating highly complex pathways, DNA sequences, and natural biological systems. In synthetic biology market, genetically modified organisms is the new approach for researchers. However, currently only one engineered gene has been developed, with increasing focus on creating clusters of genes. Also, due to the rising demand for vaccines in high income countries, synthetic biologists are more inclined towards research of various types of vaccines that can be used as prophylaxis. According to WHO, in in 2011, high income countries such as the U.S., Japan, and the U.K. contributed around 80% of global vaccine sales revenue, with these regions accounting for 20% volume share.

 

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Synthetic biology market taxonomy:

 

By Product Type

 

  • Synthetic DNA

  • Synthetic cells

  • Synthetic genes

  • Chassis organisms

  • Genetically modified organisms

  • Oligonucleotide Synthesis

By Tool

 

  • Xeno-nucleic Acids (XNA)

  • Cloning and Assembly kits

  • Oligonucleotides

  • Enzymes

By Technology

 

  • Enabling Technologies

    • Bioinformatics

    • Site-saturation Mutagenesis

    • Measurement and Modeling

    • Microfluidics

    • Cloning and Sequencing

    • Gene Synthesis

    • Genome Engineering

    • Nanotechnology

  • Enabled Technologies

    • Pathway Engineering

    • Next-generation Sequencing

By Application

 

  • Environmental Application

    • Bioremediation

    • Whole-cell Biosensors

  • Industrial Application

    • Biofuels and Renewable Energy

    • Industrial Enzymes

    • Biomaterials and Green Chemicals

  • Medical Application

    • Artificial Tissue and Tissue Regeneration

    • Pharmaceuticals

    • Drug Discovery and Therapeutics

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Government funding supporting synthetic biology market growth:

 

Growing demand for synthetic biology products such as synthetic DNA, synthetic genes for treatment of diseases and for developing genetic modified products such as hybrid crop, genetically modified animals for enhancing the nutritional value of the food is also contributing towards the growth of the synthetic biology market. Also, various governments are investing in research and development of novel synthetic biology products. For instance, according to the report from U.S. Trends in Synthetic Biology Research at the Wilson Center, during the period of six years from 2008 to 2014, the U.S. invested around US$ 820 million in research for products in synthetic biology. Among different funding agencies, the defense department became a key funder of synthetic biology research dominating the funds by national science foundation. The above key fact also suggests that U.S. is expected to be a significant contributor in synthetic biology market.

 

Regional analysis of synthetic biology market:

 

Developed countries such as the U.S., Germany, U.K., France, and Japan have mature markets for synthetic biology mainly due to large funding and favorable government regulation regarding the approval of synthetic biology products. According to genetic engineering & biotechnology news in 2010, the government of three European countries namely the Netherlands, U.K., and Germany invested around US$ 160 million in a span of five years between 2005 and 2010. Regulations such as Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) in 1997, cover commercial uses of new microorganisms not regulated by other agencies: primary rules covering industrial biotechnology. European Commission and research agencies have also increased their funding for research in synthetic biology. In emerging economies in Asia-Pacific, Middle East, and Africa, governments are focusing on tackling major issues such as under-nutrition by encouraging adoption of GMO crops. For example, Indian government is had put efforts in the past regarding in terms of intervention programs to combat malnutrition such as Integrated child development services and mid-day meal program This creates a highly conducive environment for market growth.

 

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Major acquisitions to support the growth in synthetic biology market

There are few recent acquisitions by the big brands in biotechnology that is expected to favor the market for synthetic biology. QIAGEN N.V acquired OmicSoft—a software solutions company that offers scientists and researchers tools to efficiently analyze and visualize the data in bioinformatics. This acquisition is further expected to favor the working efficiency of the company.  Key players operating in the synthetic biology market include DuPont, Amyris, Inc., GenScript USA Inc., Integrated DNA Technologies, Intrexon Corporation, New England Biolabs, Inc., Thermo Fisher Scientific, Inc., Synthetic Genomics, Inc., Royal DSM, and Novozymes.

 

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Coherent Market Insights is a prominent market research and consulting firm offering action-ready syndicated research reports, custom market analysis, consulting services, and competitive analysis through various recommendations related to emerging market trends, technologies, and potential absolute dollar opportunity.



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review SPOILER ALERT! 2017-01-25 21:42
Messing Up the Eco-System
Legacy of Heorot - 'Larry Niven', 'Jerry Pournelle', 'Steven Barnes'

Sometimes I wonder whether the more authors a book has the worse it becomes. Actually, come to think of it, I struggle to actually think of any work of literature that has more than one author – it seems as if for a book to enter into the annals of greatness the book has to be written by a single author. To me this isn't actually all that surprising because artists tend to work alone. In fact, when one considers music the same seems to apply, considering Bohemian Rhapsody was allegedly written by a single person (though I was always under the assumption that Queen, a four piece band, actually wrote the song, but then again people seem to think that Freddy Mercury actually wrote the song, Queen just performed it).

 

Anyway, as you can probably tell, this book was written by three people, which makes me wonder how a book is actually written by three people – do they write a chapter a piece, or do they just write specific characters? In either case how is it that they actually put the book together – do they sit down and work it out around some really bad cups of coffee, or do they argue about it around some really bad glasses of wine, and then go away, write their own sections and let the editors work it out. Or is it that they simply draft the outline of the book and then let poor Larry Niven sit down and put it all together. Well, however they do it the final product really didn't turn out all that well.

 

So, the story is set on a planet orbiting Tau Ceti. The characters had just come out of a hundred year long sleep and are now setting up for a new world on what appears to be a paradise. Unfortunately there was a problem with the hibernation pods and apparently everybody has emerged from deep sleep somewhat stupider. Mind you, if we are talking about the best and the brightest, maybe it is simply the fact that the one thing that they lack is common sense – this seems to always be the case when you put a bunch of academics together, the one thing that they all seem to lack is common sense. Anyway, they land on this world and in their mind it is a paradise, and after a number of surveys they believe that there isn't actually anything hostile on this world, that is until a nasty monster comes along and starts ripping everything apart. However, they don't actually believe that it was a monster, but some guy who is sulking over the fact that nobody believes that there is anything hostile on the island – that doesn't sound as if the hibernation pods had busted, that just sounds like your typical bunch of human beings who want to live with their heads in the sand – climate change anybody?

 

Anyway, they eventually realise that these creatures exist after one of them almost completely destroys the camp, so they decide to go out and hunt the rest of them down and kill them. Well, that turns out to be a particularly smart idea because it also turns out that these creatures have a natural way of keeping their population down – they eat their young. In fact, it turns out that they are like frogs – as babies they start off as fish, but when they mature they turn into these monsters – so, the mature creatures basically eat the babies, which keeps the population down. However, now that they have basically gone out and killed all the mature ones there is nothing keeping the population down, so they pretty quickly discover that the whole island is swarming with monsters. Mind you, the other catch was that they only eat their young if there is nothing else to eat, so when the colonists arrive with all their live stock, all of a sudden they have something else to eat.

 

As I mentioned, this book was rather dull and boring, and in fact is the first part of a trilogy. Sure, it did do well to explore how humans have this nasty habit of completely ruining an eco-system with their introduced species. For instance, the landed gentry introduced foxes into Australia simply so they might have something to hunt, and not surprisingly they have gone and run havoc across the environment. Mind you, the farmers then get criticised by the likes of PETA when they try to cull the foxes due to them causing issues with their live stock. Then again, I do see where they're coming from because technically humans are an introduced species, and a pest, but we don't go around culling ourselves.

 

Mind you, the other interesting thing is that we all know that the colony is going to survive, but then again this novel does play out like a movie, and unless the creators are really clever, we never actually have the protagonists lose. Okay, they have to adjust the way the colony works, namely that every man gets to have two wives (namely because half of the male population was wiped out when they went to war against the monsters – they called them Grendels after the monster from Beowulf), however the colony does manage to survive. The other interesting thing is that the planet is ten light years from Earth, and they took a hundred years to get there from Earth, and they are talking about advertising for new colonists. Well, they didn't think that through all that much because first of all it is a twenty year round trip for any communication, and even if another colony ship was sent out, it would take a hundred years for them to arrive, and that doesn't take into account humans developing new technology. Mind you, as yet I don't know of any book where the colonists arrive at a planet after travelling for a hundred years only to discover that while they were asleep humanity has invented the FTL drive and the planet has already been colonised.

 

Source: www.goodreads.com/review/show/1878686760
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review 2016-08-20 21:38
More Than Biology - DiscontentedWinter

Beautiful and tragic story with the perfect happy and full of hope ending, Amazing writing and flawless characterization with a captivating plot

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review 2016-02-20 00:00
What Is Life?: How Chemistry Becomes Biology
What Is Life?: How Chemistry Becomes Biology - Addy Pross The author offers nothing towards answering the title "What is Life" and offers nothing but the most simplistic presentation for addressing the subtitle "How Chemistry Becomes Biology".

When he does address the title, he forces the presentation into his preferred world view of teleonomy (just a fancy way of saying animate objects are teleological and inanimate objects are not, whatever).

He's going to equate maximum efficiency with DKS (dynamic kinetic systems) and explain that life arises from that process.

I did get irritated at the author. He makes the statement along the lines "to understand the what of life, one first needs to know the how it came about, and then take the particular to the general and then make the universal principals before proceeding". I fault that formulation in order for understanding and explaining of nature. (It's a very Kantian formulation of science, and I saw it just as an excuse for the author to not address the title of the book).

The author really added nothing new whatsoever to my understanding of what is life and where did it come from. There was nothing new or novel in this book. Books like this one are why I slowed down reading science books. They need to teach me something new, something I did not already know, and be so good that I want to re-listen to them again for their novel presentations and the new insights they showed me. This book did none of those things.

I wasted my time with this book. I would recommend Hazen's Great Course Lecture, "Origins of Life", Wagner's "Arrival of the Fittest" which considers the topology of the possible maximum efficiency paths which "What is Life" tries to explain from time to time but not adequately, and I would recommend, Rutherford's "Creations: How Science is Reinventing Life Itself", a book which is not too simple and not too complex but explains the things presented in this book as they should have been (and regretfully which seems to have been completely ignored by the reading (and listening) public).
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review 2016-01-14 07:29
Biology: This Shit's Complicated (alternate title)
Where Do Camels Belong?: The Story and Science of Invasive Species - Ken Thompson

For those who are unfamiliar, I'm not only passionate about books, I'm also passionate about biology. So a book about biology is right up my alley. I picked this book up simply because it was about invasive species, a topic that interests me greatly. And the subtitle had me intrigued: 'Why Invasive Species Aren't All Bad.' 

 

This subtitle had me intrigued because for a long time my stance on invasive species was one of opposition. I was in line with the group that thinks native is always good and alien is always bad. But this book has given me some new insights and changed my viewpoint.

 

Thompson does a good job of breaking things down into digestible pieces for the reader. Each chapter focuses on a different aspect of the complex issue of invasive and introduced species. He delves, not just into current discourse on the subject, but also the history of where things have come from. 

 

As with most things pertaining to biology and ecosystems and all the pieces that make them up there, is no easy answer, no simple solution or quick fix. The issue of invasive species and whether or not they are good or not is a complicated and complex topic, the real effects of which often occur well outside a timeframe we can comprehend in the present moment. 

 

Throughout the book, Thompson examines both sides of the issue, avoiding the childish act of calling one side wrong and the other side right. There really is no right or wrong answer to the question, "Are invasive species bad?" It depends on the situation. Thompson does offer many reasonable suggestions as to how further discussions of invasive species should be handled, which ultimately is the best we can do. 

 

~Ren

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