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text 2017-08-18 10:43
More Bingo Choices
The Day of the Triffids - John Wyndham
The Abyss Above Us - Ryan Notch
Stalking Jack - Madison Kent
Faust - Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,Walter Kaufmann
The Elementals - Michael Rowe,Michael McDowell
Vampire - In the Beginning - Charmain Marie Mitchell
Demon Lord - T.C. Southwell
Goblins - David Bernstein
Circus of Horrors - Carole Gill
The Thin Man - Dashiell Hammett

Well, I went through my A-list and B-list and snagged one free book off Amazon, so now my list if full! I also made another change for Classic Noir so I could participate in the group read.

 

So, here is my list now! Still subject to changes if I start to read something and decide it's a waste of my time. Only one re-read this year! I think I kept it down to two last year.

 

Classic noir: The Thin Man by Dashiel Hammett

 

Amateur sleuth: this mystery will have a main character who is not a member of law enforcement. A Spark of Justice by J.D. Hawkins re-read

 

Serial/spree killer: Normally this would have been first on my exclusions, but I've been wanting to read Cabal by Clive Barker

 

American horror story: Children of Chaos by Greg Gifune

 

Genre: horror: The Day of the Triffids by John Wyndham

 

Gothic: Unnatural Creatures by Neil Gaiman

 

Darkest London: Stalking Jack by Madison Kent

 

Modern Masters of Horror: Helltown by Jeremy Bates

 

Supernatural: Faust by Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe

 

Ghost: The Ghost of Guir House by Charles Willing Beale

 

Haunted houses: The Elementals by Michael McDowell

 

Vampires: Vampire - In the Beginning by Charmain Marie Mitchell

 

Werewolves: The Werewolf Whisperer by Camilla Ochlan and Bonita Gutierez

 

Witches: The Witching Hour by Anne Rice

 

Demons: Demon Lord by T.C. Southwell

 

Classic horror: I've read rather a lot of these since last year! But I found one I haven't yet read, The Monk by Matthew Lewis

 

Chilling children: The Doll by J.C. Martin

 

Monsters: Dead Sea by Tim Curran

 

80's horror: Faerie Tale by Raymond Feist

 

In the dark, dark woods: Into the Woods by Thomas Washburn Jr

 

Terror in a small town: Goblins by David Bernstein

 

Magical realism: Foxglove Summer by Ben Aaronovitch

 

Terrifying women: Circus of Horrors by Carol Gill

 

Diverse voices: One Blood by Qwantu Amaru

 

Free square: The Abyss Above Us by Ryan Notch

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review 2017-08-17 18:03
Plague / C.C. Humphreys
Plague - C.C. Humphreys

London, 1665. A serial killer stalks his prey, scalpel in his hand and God's vengeance in his heart. Five years after his restoration to the throne, Charles II leads his citizens by example, enjoying every excess. Londoners have slipped the shackles of puritanism and now flock to the cockpits, brothels and, especially, the theatres, where for the first time women are allowed to perform alongside the men. But not everyone is swept up in the excitement. Some see this liberated age as the new Babylon, and murder victims pile up in the streets, making no distinction in class between a royalist member of parliament and a Cheapside whore. But they have a few things in common: the victims are found with gemstones in their mouths. And they have not just been murdered; they've been . . . sacrificed.  Now the plague is returning to the city with full force, attacking indiscriminately . . . and murder has found a new friend.

 

Chris Humphreys is an inspired historical fiction author. I met him last weekend at a literary conference and he is smart, funny, and charming as the devil. He definitely benefits from his acting background, particularly his ease with performing Shakespeare (we got an excerpt from one of the Henry plays during his key-note address). During one of his panel discussions, he mentioned that as an author, one must choose how the dialog will be written—choose your form of “bygone-ese” as he called it. Humphrey’s ease with the English of Shakespeare and his playwright’s ear for what will sound good gives his fiction a feeling of reality, using just enough older vocabulary and never becoming too 21st century.

There is, of course, theatre involved in the novel—a subject that the author is knowledgeable and comfortable with. But the variety of characters, from highwayman to serial killer to royalty, gives the story a breadth that I appreciated. As a reader, you are not limited to merely the theatre of 1665, you experience many parts of London. In fact London itself could be counted as a character.

I will be working my way, gradually, through all of Chris Humphreys works and will definitely look forward to more. Highly recommended.

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review 2017-08-16 02:06
Release Day ARC Review: Out Of The Shadows by KC Wells
Out of the Shadows (Dreamspun Desires Book 40) - K.C. Wells

I adored this so much! What a sweet romance between one hunky gardener/handyman and one damaged, hiding young man who thinks an accident 8 years ago that left him severely scarred turned him into a monster not fit for society. 

Josh is a gardener/handyman for an apartment complex and has been tasked with modernizing some of the apartments by upgrading the kitchens and bathrooms. The first apartment is the home of a mysterious resident, whom nobody has apparently ever seen. Josh is a really nice guy, easy-going and kind, and he has no preconceived notions about the man who lives in the apartment. Josh feels he's there to do a job, and he plans on doing a good one. He also has a nice group of friends, including two (Nate and Dylan) who may be given the "oblivious men of the year" award. I sure hope the author has a book planned for them as well. 

Christian made a horrific mistake 8 years ago while helping a stranded motorist to jump-start his car and hooked up the wrong side first, resulting in severe acid burns to his face, arms and chest. He moved to Boston to start a new life - if you can call it a life - and cut himself off from friends, family, and everyone. He orders what he needs online, groceries are delivered to his front door, and he only rarely goes outside, and when he does, it's at night, cloaked in darkness. He's afraid of people's reactions to his scars and would rather be alone than see them pity him or recoil from him.

Unbeknownst to Josh, Christian has been watching him work in the flower beds and such, admiring and lusting after him. Of course, Christian has no illusions of getting any closer to Josh than through the window, but ogling is enough. Or so he tells himself.

On the first day of the renovation job, Josh believes that Christian isn't home, but the truth comes out, and Christian has a difficult time believing that Josh's reaction to the scars (and the monster he sees in the mirror) is so calm and accepting.

A mutual love for Harry Potter brings them closer, they share lunch every day while Josh is working on the apartment, and even after he's done and has moved on to the next place, and it was so lovely to watch Christian begin to trust Josh, who starts to draw the slightly older man out of his shell. Shared lunches turn into watching a movie at the theater (late at night, of course), and meeting Josh's friends.

Christian blossoms under Josh's unfailing support, and their mutual attraction fairly quickly turns into real emotions and a desire to be together. Josh helps Christian realize that what he sees in the mirror is not a monster after all, and that while some people may react in a way Christian expects them to (recoiling in horror), the majority of folks do not. 

I would have liked Christian to consider therapy to deal with his self-hatred, because Josh is not a therapist, and while he provided steady support, love, and understanding, I wasn't sure that Christian's rather rapid progression to being comfortable in public spaces (after hiding for so long) was completely realistic. However, considering that this is a Dreamspun Desires title, this did not influence my rating or enjoyment of this book.

The author did a great job with the characters, and their romance was believable within the parameters of this series. Their story is, while definitely on the fluffy side, super romantic and hopeful, and their HEA was well deserved. A quiet, low-key romance, very little angst, and so very sweet - I had a fabulous time reading it.

And I'm serious about Nate and Dylan needing their own book. Please get right on that, Ms. Wells.


** I received a free copy of this book from its publisher. A positive review was not promised in return. **

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text 2017-08-15 20:24
Reading progress update: I've read 111 out of 355 pages.
Goddess of Light - P.C. Cast

Pamela is 30. But she says she isn't young anymore. 

 

...

 

Bite me, woman.

 

 

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photo 2017-08-14 23:12
Those Summer Nights - Nan O'Berry,Gerald... Those Summer Nights - Nan O'Berry,Gerald Costlow,Denise Stout,Teresa K. Cypher,Barbara Miller
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