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review 2017-04-23 22:07
The Victorian Chaise-longue
The Victorian Chaise-Longue - Marghanita Laski,P.D. James

"Will you give me your word of honour," said Melanie, "that I am not going to die?"

I love it when a book starts with a first sentence that packs a punch. With this one, we immediately know that what follows will be a story of life and death.

 

The Victorian Chaise-longue is a very short (99 pages) novel about a woman in the late 1940s or early 1950s that is recovering from illness and suddenly finds herself in a most precarious situation - it appears she has woken up in 1864.

 

I will not reveal anything else about the plot (and the above is pretty much revealed on all general descriptions of the book), other than that the plot takes on a different shape depending on how you approach it.

 

Sounds mysterious? Well, it isn't. It's just that the plot is one thing if you read it with the expectation that everything in the book happens just as it is described. If, however, you begin to doubt the narrator, you may start to wonder what is really going on. 

 

Do I know the answer to this question. Nope. 

 

However, I really enjoyed the conjectures that this question of whether "here" is "here" or whether "here" is really "there" allows. In fact, by the end of the book I could not help but draw parallels to one of my all-time favourite novels A Tale for the Time Being, only of course that Marghanita Laski published The Victorian Chaise-longue in 1953, 60 years before Ozeki's book. Do I think that Ozeki borrowed from Laski? Absolutely not. 

The comparison merely came up because both authors seem to base their ideas on a similar question about what time really is, and how we live in time.

 

And both books look at people in their time, and really caught up in time and other circumstances. In Laski's novel, this leads to illustrate the state of women in society - Victorian society and that of the 1940s/50s. Is there much change? 

 

The Victorian Chaise-longue seems to be listed as gothic or horror in the same vein as Charlotte Perkins Gilman's The Yellow Wallpaper is but I have issues with this classification. In my mind, tagging works as "gothic" or "horror", seems to pass them off as works of the imagination when, in fact, they are quite real. Scary and horrible they may be, but the connotations of the "horror" genre seem to deny such works the sense of veiled realism that truly punches the gut.

 

While I loved the book for its content and delivery, there were a few quibbles I had with the writing, which seemed to jump about a bit (But then, this may have been a way to show the MC's state of mind.) and with one element that left me puzzled - had the treatment of TB in the late 1940s/early 1950s really not moved on from the 1920s?

 

I mean, Laski makes mention of penicillin, yet, no antibiotics seem to be part of the treatment and the MC herself still believes that fresh air, sunlight, and milk will provide a cure - much like prescribed in Thomas Mann's The Magic Mountain (1924). Again, this is not a real criticism of the book, just an additional question I derived from it.

 

I am very much looking forward to reading more by this author.

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text 2017-04-23 16:45
Reading progress update: I've read 1%.
Chase the Sun - Christina Lee,Nyrae Dawn,Tyler Stevens,Iggy Toma

Iggy Toma and Tyler Stevens? All in one book?  There is no way this will not be good - give it to me!

 

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review 2017-04-22 21:16
A Can't Miss Pleasure
Apprentice in Death - J.D. Robb

It is so much fun to pick up a book, lose myself in the story within a paragraph or two and nor resurface until I’ve read every last word contained between the covers. It is also something I don't get to do nearly often enough but, invariably that's what happens when I pick up a new instalment in JD Robb’s In Death series. That goes a long way towards explaining why this is the only series of books I’ve stuck with over the course of this many new stories. With most other series I’ll eventually reach a point where the ‘been there, done that, need something new’ feeling gets too strong and I find myself drifting away. Not so with the In Death series. Not only do I pick up the latest release as soon as it hits the shelves in my library, I actively keep track of when to expect the next one so I can be sure to bring it home as soon as it’s available. To say I’m addicted to Eve Dallas and Roarke would be a gross understatement.

 

As can be said for its 42 prequels, Apprentice in Death is a fast paced, thrilling, and totally engrossing story. JD Robb has, over the course of this series, created a cast of characters who have become part of my life. I know Eve, Roarke, Peabody, McNabb and all the others and have no doubt I would recognise them should I run into them in the street. The near future version of the world she’s created continues to fascinate me. As for the criminals she introduces us to, and their methods and motives…let me just say that Mrs. Robb occasionally scares me. She invariably manages to give her villains just about enough of a human face and almost reasonable motives, to put me on edge and keep me compulsively turning the pages.

 

While I thoroughly enjoy the mysteries and suspense in these stories they are not the main reason for my addiction to this series. I keep on returning to the In Death books because of the continuing story about Eve, Roarke and those close to them. I laugh out loud at the banter, occasionally wipe away a tear at an especially touching moment, enjoy Eve and Roarke’s sexy times, and will never get bored with getting to know these characters better which each subsequent tale. After having read all 43 novels in this series so far, I still can’t imagine there will ever come a moment when I won’t be looking forward to the next In Death title. I fully agree with Harlan Coben's blurb on the cover of this book. J.D. Robb's novels are indeed 'can't-miss pleaures'. Is it time for the

next book yet?

 

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review 2017-04-21 21:26
In Deep Trouble (Triple-D Ranch #2) by Terry Odell
In Deep Trouble (Triple-D Ranch) (Volume 2) - Terry Odell

Cecily Cooper is a dispatcher for the Sheriffs Department. She knows all to well of the angst in peoples lives. She has decided to open a pilot program on her brother Derrick's ranch called Healing With Horses. She wants to give deserving people a second chance. She feels that some hard work and responsibility will help turn lives around. 

 

Her first client is 17 year old Grady. Grady has been arrested for shoplifting and is a runaway. He's super smart but doesn't want people to know. He loves to read as well. He has had a rough life. Mom has brought home countless men home until it was almost a revolving door of men. Mom finally married one, yep he has money but he is also a child molester. When Grady turned 17 he ran away. After being arrested his social worker signs him up for Cecily's program. Reluctantly he goes.

 

Bryce Barrett is an Ex- Army Ranger who is a hand at the ranch. He prefers the animals to people but he has a thing for Cecily. It's ore of a love hate relationship though. To his grief Bryce is put in charge of Grady. Being as Grady knows nothing about horses or ranch life Bryce has his work cut out for him. 

 

All is going pretty good until they start finding mutilated cows on the ranch. After they catch the cow killer, Grady goes missing. Trying to find out if Grady just ran away or if he was taken. Cecily and the gang decide to take it upon themselves to find Grady which proves to be dangerous when she is also kidnapped.

 

I really enjoyed this book. It has some romance, some mystery, and some danger. All things I enjoy in a book. There is very little strong language and actually only 2 hot sex scenes and 1 of the 2 are interrupted. 

 

Pamela Almand has done a great job narrating. She carries the story through very well. She lets you feel the emotions portrayed in the book with her voice. She does a great job with the voices for each character as well. 

 

 

You can check out this Audiobook on Aubidble

ll

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text 2017-04-21 10:18
21st April 2017
Jane Eyre - Q.D. Leavis,Charlotte Brontë

I am no bird; and no net ensnares me: I am a free human being with an independent will.


Charlotte Brontë

 

The first novel that Charlotte Brontë (born April 21, 1816) wrote, The Professor, was rejected by multiple publishers, but her second, Jane Eyre, was quickly accepted and found fans immediately.

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