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review 2017-07-13 21:43
A Different Journey: Mary Tudor by Lassie Gaffney
A Different Journey - Mary Tudor - Lassie Gaffney

The premise of this book drew me in. Anyone who knows me knows that I would love to have seen a happier ending for Mary Tudor (Henry VIII's daughter, not his sister). In this novel, the author attempts to rewrite history with Mary becoming a young wife and mother but never queen. And that is when the problems started.

 

The idea that Catherine of Aragon and her daughter would each decide to forgo Mary's birthright in order to keep Henry content starts this story off on the wrong foot for me. After all, in reality, the were both willing to sacrifice almost anything to ensure that Mary's (and Catherine's) position was recognized. This is just the first of many implausible changes in historical events and people that occurs. I understand that this is an alternate history. That's why I picked it up, but to be enjoyable it still needs to make sense based on what we know of the real people and events.

 

I could have accepted the historical changes if the novel was at least entertaining, but it is written almost entirely in stilted dialogue. It is tricky to write dialogue that comes across as realistic but without the ordinary level of repetition. The dialogue in this book not only doesn't sound like what people would actually say ('That's a shame' when a close family member dies, for example), but the reader is forced to endure things being repeated for the benefit of different characters.

 

The whole thing just reads like a first draft. There's potential here. I LOVE the idea of Mary being married to Reginald Pole, whether she became queen or not, but this needs more editing and polishing to make it a great story.

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text 2017-07-13 05:44
Absolutely Fabulous!
The Prince and the Dressmaker - Jen Wang

The Prince and the Dressmaker is a modern fairy tale in which the magic stems not from a royal marriage but from acceptance. Prince Sebastian is a teenaged prince who is constantly being set up by his parents who are searching for his bride. Prince Sebastian, however, is more enamored by the fashions of the day, and so, with the help of his butler, Emile, he hires Frances, whose theatrical dresses (yup, dresses) send him out on the town in glorious disguise. Sebastian’s alter ego makes quite a splash, and so he has to learn how to juggle his newfound celebrity, his friendships, and his parents’ demands.

 

The story set forth in The Prince and the Dressmaker is unlike anything available in any other graphic novel I know. It will be vitally important to many teens, and I hope both middle school and high school libraries will stock it.

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text 2017-06-13 14:29
AMAZON REVIEW TOUR - Different Sides (Phantom Security #1) by Marissa Dobson
Different Sides - Marissa Dobson
Murder? One call is all it takes to shatter Elise Dalton’s heart. Her father’s been murdered and the accused is none other than the man she had given her heart to. Though he’d cut himself out of her life years earlier, being the daughter to the chief of police, she has heard enough gossip to let her know that the choices he’s made have lead him down a path of self-destruction. He isn’t the same man she’d fallen in love with but a part of her doesn’t want to believe he could kill her father in cold blood.
 
Gun carrying, motorcycle riding, bad boy Flash Arquette has done some terrible shit in his life. He’s even taken the fall for someone, and every time he’s done the time for his crimes. This time, though, he’s innocent and no one’s listening to him. He doesn’t care what anyone thinks of him except Elise. She had to know the truth. He’s hurt her enough in the past, but he would never have done this to her. The only problem is the convincing evidence against him and his inability to give them proof of his innocence without breaking the contract he signed.
 
Their lives have taken opposing paths, but as the steel bars close around Flash, Elise realizes she’s lost him for good. The small ray of hope that he could change dies and the grief doubles. When those around Flash come forth with information that he’s been set up, she’s not sure she believes them, but she has to find out the truth. Nothing will bring her father back but she might be able to save Flash from death row.

 

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Source: archaeolibrarianologist.blogspot.de/2017/06/amazon-review-tour-different-sides.html
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review 2017-05-30 19:03
Lovely illustrations and scientifically sound.
Different? Same! - Heather Tekavec,Pippa Curnick

This was a beautifully illustrated children's book, highlighting the similarities between many, apparently different, animals. A blubbery walrus, a wrinkly elephant, a bristly warthog and a smooth narwhal are all very different at first glance, "but look closely now", they all have tusks. The catchy repetition of the phrase "but look closely now" worked really well to keep the rhythm and interest of the book's young audience.

 

My 15 month grandson was too young for the comparisons between the animals but he loved the images of the animals and making the noises of the ones he recognised.

Unfortunately the copy I received via NetGalley could not be viewed on my Kindle so this is not going to join 'The Forest Sleeps' as one of our favourite books.

 

At the end of the book all the animals are repeated, with an opportunity to note more similarities between them - spots, numbers of legs, or webbed feet, for example. There is also an explanation for features such as tusks, shells, whiskers, etc. I would imagine that this book would be popular in a pre-school library and for sharing with children between 2 and 5 years, it has plenty to offer for quite a varied age group.

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text 2017-05-15 00:47
Lovely illustrations and scientifically sound.
Different? Same! - Heather Tekavec,Pippa Curnick

This was a beautifully illustrated children's book, highlighting the similarities between many, apparently different, animals.
A blubbery walrus, a wrinkly elephant, a bristly warthog and a smooth narwhal are all very different at first glance, "but look closely now", they all have tusks. The catchy repetition of the phrase "but look closely now" worked really well to keep the rhythm and interest of the book's young audience.

My 15 month grandson was too young for the comparisons between the animals but he loved the images of the animals and making the noises of the ones he recognised.
Unfortunately the copy I received via NetGalley could not be viewed on my Kindle so this is not going to join The Forest Sleeps as one of our favourite books.

At the end of the book all the animals are repeated, with an opportunity to note more similarities between them - spots, numbers of legs, or webbed feet, for example. There is also an explanation for features such as tusks, shells, whiskers, etc.
I would imagine that this book would be popular in a pre-school library and for sharing with children between 2 and 5 years, it has plenty to offer for quite a varied age group.

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