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Search tags: Elie-Wiesel
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review 2018-04-15 20:34
A Lucky Child (A Memoir of Surviving Auschwitz as a Young Boy)
A Lucky Child: A Memoir of Surviving Auschwitz as a Young Boy - Thomas Buergenthal,Elie Wiesel

For being about the horrors of Nazi occupation of Europe and the Holocaust, this wasn't a difficult  read. The author, Thomas Buergenthal, writes about his childhood in an approachable manner. It probably helps that he's writing it several decades after the fact - the pain and anger he would have felt during and immediately after the events have had time to heal. It's light on details of the day-to-day activities of those years, as he and his family were first on the run from Germans, then living in the Jewish ghetto in Poland, then the various concentration camps he was imprisoned in. As a result, it glosses over a lot of the horrors, focusing instead on events that stick out to him most - but those events are rather harrowing in themselves. He doesn't linger on them though. Some might find this lack of detail frustrating, others may be relieved. I've read other accounts of the Holocaust, most memorably Elie Wiesel's Night, so I was able to fill in what wasn't there. 

 

This felt like a very honest and intimate account of his days surviving WWII and the Holocaust. His writing here is flowing and stark, and he doesn't get bogged down with unnecessary repetition like last few autobiographies I've read. He was indeed a "lucky" child to survive Dr. Mengele and Auschwitz. Speaking of Night, they were both clearly in Auschwitz at the same time, as they both describe the Death March with the same sort of dreadful resignation. He was lucky many other times in order to survive, and that continues even after his liberation as he details how he was eventually reunited with his mother.

 

One cannot stress enough how important this time period was to the shaping of the world as it is today and why it's necessary that it continue to be taught in our schools. Buergenthal's work in international humanitarian law is inspirational and reminds us that, no matter how bleak things can still appear, there is hope for improvement and that things already have improved in many places. We can make the world a better place, but we can only do that by remembering the atrocities that came before and striving not to repeat them.

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review 2017-11-15 19:06
Night / Elie Wiesel
Night - Marion Wiesel,Elie Wiesel

An autobiographical narrative in which the author describes his experiences in Nazi concentration camps, watching family and friends die, and how they led him to believe that God is dead.  Night is Elie Wiesel’s masterpiece, a candid, horrific, and deeply poignant autobiographical account of his survival as a teenager in the Nazi death camps.

 

I chose this book as one of several Remembrance Day reads. I read Viktor Frankl’s Man's Search for Meaning just before it and, although there are many similarities, there are also interesting differences.

Reading about life in a concentration camp is a brutal experience. Frankl had the advantages of being a grown man and a psychiatrist when he entered the system—he understood human behaviour, both good and bad, and could make assessments that the teenage Wiesel wasn’t able to. The fact is that anyone who survived the death camps ended up doing things that were selfish in order to survive and people who are starving don’t have the emotional energy to spare to care about others. They are numb to both their own suffering and that of even their own family members. Knowing that other prisoners were in worse shape and could have used more help and/or sympathy left these survivors with terrible guilt, feeling that they were faulty human beings who should have done better. They saw horrible things, they did things that they judge themselves for, and it is absolutely no wonder that they had psychological issues for the rest of their lives.

Where Frankl emerged from Auschwitz with a renewed sense of purpose, Wiesel seems to have changed profoundly—from an innocent, religious, and scholarly young man, he became a crusader to preserve the memory of the Holocaust. This book is a testament to his experience, his survival, and his mission.

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text 2017-11-04 14:04
16 Tasks of the Festive Season - Task Three - Verteran’s Day/Armistice Day
Night - Marion Wiesel,Elie Wiesel

"Night" broke me for several days. The ravages of the Holocaust are still felt to this day. It sickens me we still have Holocaust deniers. Also with the rise of white supremacists in the United States again, this book has been on my mind. We have people going to colleges and wanting to speak on ethnic cleansing to save the white race and I'm dumbfounded on a daily basis this is deemed acceptable by some people. That some people keep saying we as a nation have gone too PC and we've stifled free speech that these ideas should not be refused in our loudest voices by all. 

 

This passage from this book haunts me.

“Never shall I forget that night, the first night in camp, which has turned my life into one long night, seven times cursed and seven times sealed....Never shall I forget those moments which murdered my God and my soul and turned my dreams to dust. Never shall I forget these things, even if I am condemned to live as long as God Himself. Never.” 

 

Tasks for Verteran’s Day/Armistice Day: Make, or draw a red poppy and show us a pic of your red poppy or other symbol of remembrance –OR– post a quote or a piece of poetry about the ravages of war. 

 

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review 2017-04-01 05:21
Heart rending story
Night (Audio) - Elie Wiesel

 

 

This book is beautiful and heartbreaking. I read this book a few years ago, and it was unforgettable. My son was reading this for school, so I decided to listen to the audiobook. The narrator was amazing and the story is touching. This book needs to be read by every generation.

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review SPOILER ALERT! 2017-03-01 11:04
February 2017-- A Wrap Up
The Hobbit (Graphic Novel) - Chuck Dixon
X-Men: Magneto Testament - Carmine Di Giandomenico,Greg Pak
Monstress Volume 1: Awakening - Marjorie M. Liu
Outtakes from the Grave (Night Huntress Book 8) - Jeaniene Frost
Hellboy, Vol. 1: Seed of Destruction - John Byrne,Mike Mignola
Asimov's Science Fiction: Hugo & Nebula Award Winning Stories - Sheila Williams
Night - Marion Wiesel,Elie Wiesel

 

 

Old Faves in New Flavors

 

The Hobbit Graphic Novel

The novel stayed true to the book. However, I wasn't too impressed with the artwork. It could have been more attractive. Given that I've just finished reading Monstress, it is no surprise that everything else looks almost dull in comparison!

 

 

 

Words that have always made me sad and touched my heart:

 

 

Outtakes from the Grave

 

This book is solely for the readers who have loved the Night Huntress series. It contains deleted scenes and different versions that were scrapped for various reasons. It was a good way to revisit the duo that we'd all miss now that the series has ended. Since I have added books from the two spinoff series to my TBR recently, I'm guessing I'll come across Cat & Bones there too.

 

 

 

Holocaust Horrors

 

X-Men: Magneto Testament

 

Since I read this first, I didn't realize how heavily inspired it was by the book, Night by Elie Wiesel. Even so, I loved it, both for the content and the art. A scene that stayed with me was about the girl Magneto is trying to save. She is found among dead bodies and is found to have survived because she remembered what he had said to her & had hidden herself in the pile.

 

 

Night

 

What I liked about this book was that the author wasn't interested in getting people to feel sorry for them. Instead, their objective was to prevent such a catastrophe from happening again. That is one of the reasons why the book felt much more authentic to me than The Book Thief ever did. Of course, the fact that the author lived through the events has a lot to do with that, as well.

 

I think this quote from the book says it all:

 

 

Eye-Candiliciousness

 

Hellboy, Vol. 1: Seed of Destruction

 

Find my mini-review here.

 

 

Monstress, Vol 1: Awakening

 

 

 

Everybody has been talking about this, so I'll just say that you might wanna check it out for yourself.

 

Asimov's Science Fiction

 

Detailed review here.

 

February was a good month. I read more graphic novels than I usually read and it is always good to try new things.

 

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