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review SPOILER ALERT! 2017-05-22 20:35
The Unwritten Rule (Review)
The Unwritten Rule - Elizabeth Scott

(I would like to add that um, ANY book that has two people playing barefoot footsie on it repulses me immediately, and honestly, I couldn't expect anything more than two stars with that image in my head every time I picked it up.)

 

This is yet another book I read almost two years ago, and I don’t remember it incredibly well. However, I do remember that this was cliché and used a dreadful stream-of-consciousness style narration that made Sarah, the main character, seem immature and incompetent.  (Yet another reason I despise present tense writing.)

 

The vast majority of this book is actually painful. Sarah is obsessed with Ryan, and her inner mind theatre is just a compilation of everything she loves most about him. She’s constantly thinking about him, obsessing over him, and wondering what it would be like to be with him. She is absolutely convinced he feels the same way for her (and because it’s a good ole stereotypical YA novel, he does), but they tiptoe around for stupid reasons. Ryan is actually the one I dislike the most in all this because his confession to Sarah is that he’s always had feelings for her, but decided to date Brianna anyway. I absolutely don’t understand that logic, and I have no sympathy for his “dilemma.”

 

The above encompasses about 95% of the plot; however, I decided to give this a two-star rating because The Unwritten Rule focused quite a bit on the actual friendship between Brianna and Sarah, and how destructive it really was. I have been in hurtful friendships before, and while I never had friends quite as cruel as Brianna, I sympathized with Sarah’s situation (outside of her whole trying to steal Brianna’s boyfriend thing). At the end of the novel, I felt like the story’s ending, while happily-ever-after in that Sarah and Ryan end up together, still has the friendship at the forefront. Sarah gets Ryan, yes, but the bigger thing she gets is freedom from a toxic friendship, and the realization that just because you’ve been best friends with someone for a long time doesn’t mean you need to stay friends with them forever. This was a lesson I had to learn in high school, and I felt like Scott could have been really successful if this story was about Brianna and Sarah, with Ryan floating somewhere in the background.

 

Overall: This wasn’t really a good book, although it ended up with a pretty good lesson in the end. I definitely wouldn’t recommend it because Sarah’s narration will make you want to stab something, but it definitely wasn’t as bad as it could have been. I have all of Elizabeth Scott’s books on my to-read list, and this one doesn’t make me excited to get to another one anytime soon. However, I think there’s potential, and maybe I just need one with a less cliché plot in order for it to really click for me.

 

http://thaliasbooks.tumblr.com/post/160956797922/the-unwritten-rule-review

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review 2017-04-27 02:31
A Fun Read
How Dachshunds Came to Be: A Tall Tale About a Short Long Dog (Volume 1) - Kizzie Elizabeth Jones,Scott Ward

How Dachshunds Came to Be:  A Tall Tale about a Short Long Dog by Kizzie Elizabeth Jones is a mythical story about how Dachshunds were created.  The reader is introduced to a little girl who loves to play with her sea creature friends.  One day, the girl becomes sad because her friends are preparing to migrate to warmer waters for the winter. 

 

The girl’s sea creature friends decide that since they cannot stay with her, they will create an animal that can.  Each friend contributes a personal characteristic to the creature.  What magical beast do they create?  Dachshunds!

 

Will the little girl like the Dachshunds?  More importantly, will the Dachshunds like her?

I thought this book was a fun read.  I do wish that the story would have been a bit longer.  I feel that it ended quite abruptly after the girl is gifted the Dachshunds.  I would have liked to see more interaction between the girl and her newfound friends.

 

Additionally, I would have liked to have a little more background information about the little girl.  Is she living alone on the beach?  What happened to her family?  If she has a family, what do they think of the Dachshunds?

 

Scott Ward’s illustrations are simply delightful!  I love his use of vibrant colors.  Ward’s depiction of Dachshunds is spot on and I love the characters that he has created.  My favorite illustration is the blueprint of the sea creatures.  The detail of the illustration blew me away.

 

Overall, this book will delight animal lovers of all ages.

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review 2016-09-25 22:45
Living Dead Girl
Living Dead Girl - Elizabeth Scott

I felt that this novel was okay. After reading the novel’s synopsis, I expected more emotions and more energy to occur within its pages but after reading it, I felt that the novel had more of an even tone and I have mixed feeling about this. I understand how the main character felt after being held all those years being locked in her current condition but things were changing, I thought that would change her too.  

The novel is told through the eyes of Alice who had been abducted when she was ten. Now five years later, Alice realizes that things are changing. Ray wants something else in his life and he expects Alice to help him achieve it.   I felt that Alice was numb as she told her story. She was living with Ray and people in their neighborhood kept to themselves so no one questioned her existence. When Ray tells Alice what he needs, I was shocked and then I wondered how she would respond. As the novel progressed, the lack of energy within it created a hardship for me. I wanted to know the ending but I also wanted to abandon the book. I liked how the novel finished out; I just wished it would have ended with some gusto.

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text 2016-09-13 16:07
Mary Sue & Her Magical Menagerie: Baehrly Breathing | Review
Baehrly Breathing: Goldie Locke and the Were Bears, Book 1 - Elizabeth A Reeves,Elizabeth A Reeves,L.E. Scott

A fluffy Cozy Contemporary Fantasy Mystery with some dark undertones.

 

It's difficult to be taken seriously when you are a member of the Magical community and saddled with the unfortunate name 'Goldie Locke'. It certainly doesn't help if you are also about five feet tall, blond, and most commonly described as 'cute.'. What was a girl to do?

 

Become one of the most dreaded Magical environmental lawyers of all time?

 

Goldie isn't there yet, but she's well on her way when a case drags her into uncharted territory-- working with Ordinary officials to figure out why 'unusual' remains are being discovered all around New England.

 

Buy Now | +Goodreads

Whispersync Deal Alert*: Kindle + Audible = $4.98 (must purchase Kindle first, prices may change)

Disclosure: GMB uses affiliate links, clicking and making a purchase may result in a small commission for me.


Source: I purchased this book myself from Audible.

 

BOOK DETAILS:

Baehrly Breathing by Elizabeth A Reeves, read by LE Scott, published 2013 / Length: 5 hrs 8 min / Available exclusively from Audible (& Amazon)

 

SERIES INFO:

This is Book #1 of 5.5 so far in the "Goldie Locke and the Were Bears" series. The first 3.5 books are available on audio.

 

SUMMARY:

Simple & fluffy, with a heroine who is more than a bit of a Mary Sue, this is nevertheless a fun book that I enjoyed and occasionally listen to again.

 

I won't be reading any further in this series, however, since I am not a fan of love triangles; plus I have read that the books get darker after this. But I don't regret reading this one.

 

Note: Shifter are a minor part of this first book (just in case that is what you are looking for.)

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review 2016-05-26 04:00
Review: Love You Hate You Miss You by Elizabeth Scott
Love You Hate You Miss You - Elizabeth Scott

Quick review for a quick read. I think every Elizabeth Scott book I've read thus far has such a potent attention to the respective character emotions she showcases. This book does the grief and healing process after the loss of a friend very well. Amy has survivor's guilt over the death of Julia - her former best friend. The two girls were in an vehicular accident - with Amy drunk and Julia shaken by grief in the events of that respective night. "Love You Hate You Miss You" shows Amy grappling with people's perception of the event, her changed relationships, a potential romance (which I honestly felt was weak and underdeveloped compared to the overarching story), and trying to make sense of her own emotions and guilt in the aftermath. I really felt like I was in her head and grieving along with her, though I'll admit there were times when I found it hard to follow the poor choices she made. I felt the book did a great job of making the experiences intimate to Amy's character on an overarching note.

I only wish that the coming to terms didn't abruptly end as much as it did, and that the romance in this didn't really fall as flat as it did. Granted, I could definitely see Amy's emotions and connections, but it worked so much better with her grief and showing her relationship with her parents. I didn't like that the romance Amy was in mainly came in her grief process rather than as a naturally built chemistry. Overall though, this was an emotional and very strong read.

Overall score: 4/5 stars.

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