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text 2018-08-18 03:39
Reading progress update: I've read 78 out of 314 pages.
Engineering Animals: How Life Works - Alan Mcfadzean,Mark Denny

This book is surprisingly fun. It's just technical enough to be able to dabble in it while still glossing over parts so that they're not overwhelming. Plus there's a drawing of a snail modelled like a tank! And some dry humour like the following:

"From a sedate 0.8 mm · s-1 [garden snails] can rev up to a blistering 2.0 mm · s-1 when circumstances dictate. Quick they're not, but they're faster than a strawberry (and their other food items) and that is good enough."

And what's even better, and that I just noticed, is that they actually write units properly! Look at that middle dot! Don't mind me. I'll just be reading one of the next chapters.

 

 

Sorry if the photo's a little blurry.

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review 2018-07-20 08:13
The Portable Cosmos by Alexander Jones
A Portable Cosmos: Revealing the Antikythera Mechanism, Scientific Wonder of the Ancient World - Alexander Jones

TITLE:  The Portable Cosmos:  Revealing the Antikythera Mechanism, Scientific Wonder of the Ancient World

 

AUTHOR:  Alexander Jones

 

DATE PUBLISHED:  2017

 

FORMAT:  Hardcover

 

ISBN-13:  9780199739349

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Book Description:

 

"From the Dead Sea Scrolls to the Terracotta Army, ancient artifacts have long fascinated the modern world. However, the importance of some discoveries is not always immediately understood. This was the case in 1901 when sponge divers retrieved a lump of corroded bronze from a shipwreck at the bottom of the Mediterranean Sea near the Greek island of Antikythera. Little did the divers know they had found the oldest known analog computer in the world, an astonishing device that once simulated the motions of the stars and planets as they were understood by ancient Greek astronomers. Its remains now consist of 82 fragments, many of them containing gears and plates engraved with Greek words, that scientists and scholars have pieced back together through painstaking inspection and deduction, aided by radiographic tools and surface imaging. More than a century after its discovery, many of the secrets locked in this mysterious device can now be revealed.

In addition to chronicling the unlikely discovery of the Antikythera Mechanism, author Alexander Jones takes readers through a discussion of how the device worked, how and for what purpose it was created, and why it was on a ship that wrecked off the Greek coast around 60 BC. What the Mechanism has uncovered about Greco-Roman astronomy and scientific technology, and their place in Greek society, is truly amazing. The mechanical know-how that it embodied was more advanced than anything the Greeks were previously thought capable of, but the most recent research has revealed that its displays were designed so that an educated layman could understand the behavior of astronomical phenomena, and how intertwined they were with one's natural and social environment. It was at once a masterpiece of machinery as well as one of the first portable teaching devices. Written by a world-renowned expert on the Mechanism, A Portable Cosmos will fascinate all readers interested in ancient history, archaeology, and the history of science.
"

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The conglomerate of corroded and broken bronze pieces, eventually known as the  Antikythera Mechanism, were salvaged from a shipwreck in the early 1900s.  Initially, the fragments were studied without any certainty of what they were. By the end of that century it was confirmed that the metal device with its gears and advanced clockwork mecahnism was some kind of analog computer.  It was eventually determined that the mechanism predicted phases of the moon, planetary positions and even eclipses with great precision.

A Portable Cosmos provides a description of the discovery of the Antikythera mechanism, an extensive  desciption of the device itself and how it worked, as well as the ancient astronomy behind it.   Jones explores the mystery of the Antikythera mechanism in a no nonsense fashion and includes relevant diagrams and photographs where necessary.  The author does a thorough job of presenting numerous related topics such as the history of astronomy and astrology, calendrics and the mechanics of eclipses, as well as any ancient records of such a mechanism.  Cicero wrote about a planetarium that Archimedes used as a teaching tool, which may have been similar to the Antikythera mechanism.  The book is devided into thematic chapters, so if the technical aspects are too detailed, the reader can skip these chapters without missing out too much.  This book is scholarly and rather technical, but is none the less absorbing and very interesting.

 

 

 

 

 

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review 2018-06-22 10:21
WE: ROBOT by David Hambling
WE: ROBOT: The robots that already rule our world - David Hambling

TITLE: WE: ROBOT: The Robots That Already Rule Our World

 

AUTHOR:  David Hambling

 

PUBLICATION DATE: 2018

 

FORMAT: ebook/ PDF

 

ISBN-13: 978 1 78131 805 8

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NOTE: I received a copy of this book from NetGalley. This review is my honest opinion of the book.

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From the blurb:

Robots exist all around us. They populate our factories, assist our surgeons and have become an integral part of our armed forces. But they are not just working behind the scenes – impressive inventions such as free-roaming hoovers takecare of your household chores and the iPal is set to become your closest friend.

David Hambling reveals the groundbreaking machines – once the realm of science fiction – that are by our sides today, and those that are set to change the future forever. From the Reem robocop that polices the streets of Dubai to the drones that deliver our parcels and even the uncanny Gemonoid Hi-4 built to look just like you, here are fifty unique robots that reach into every aspect of our daily lives.

We:Robot examines why robots have become embedded in our culture, how they work and what they tell us about our society and its future.

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In We:Robot, David Hambling discusses the myriad of ways that robots and humans already work together and what the future may hold for robot-human interactions.  He provides a variety of specific robotic examples under four categories:  robots at work, robots at war, robots in your life and robots beyond.  Each robot example includes a page sized diagram (and sometimes a photograph), its dimensions, construction material, power source, processor, year of first use and then a summary of the robot's history and uses.  

Examples of specific robots include:
(1) industrial robots such as those that help put cars together, those that are designed to pick strawberries, skyscraper window washers (aptly named the Gekko Facade Robot), pilotbots, the alpha burger-bot, and the robot that herds and milks cows!!;
(2) household, lifestyle and medical robots such as the Roomba "vacuum cleaner", the Automower 450X, the Da Vinci Surgical System, the kiddies entertainment unit (IPAL - not sure letting a robot raise your child is a good idea, but it's there!), bionic hands;
(3) war robots such as drones, the packhorse replacement packbot, exoskeletons; and
(4) robots in the future such as the robonaut, underwater dolphin robot, a remote controlled lifeguard robot, Curiosity Mars rover, the soft, squishy octobot, swarming kilobots, and the Dubai police robots.

I found this book to be particularly fascinating - I had no idea there were that many robots running around!  The writing style is clear and conversational, with no technobabble.  The illustrations are beautifully (and colourfully) rendered and accompanied by colour photographs of a selection of the stranger robots.

This is an interesting book that takes a look at some specific robots, how they work, how they fit into our lives and what the future holds for us and them.  I suspect even technophobes will find this book interesting.

 

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text 2018-06-19 04:42
A Good Education Opens Doors To Great Jobs

Jobs are plenty these days for the one who has the qualification. The economy is good condition and companies across the globe are spreading their operations and recruiting more people. Despite automation in many sectors, the demand for human workforce has not decreased. In many sectors, there is an increase in demand for people. Companies look for people who are not just qualified but have passed out from good institutions. When there is a choice of candidates available, big companies choose the ones who have studied in institutions that are known for good, quality education.

 

A degree or diploma from a reputed university is highly valid in the job market. You all know how the big corporates go to big universities to get the best of the lot. Companies also don’t shy away from paying well for the right candidate. You can see how important education from a good university is. Singapore has some of the finest universities in the world and Tap Enrol can get you admission to any of these universities. We can also suggest you as to which university is good which courses.

 

Universities in Singapore follow the syllabus that is being followed by the world’s leading universities. These universities also give an opportunity for the students to have practical training while in college and also a chance to interact with students and faculty from other universities. This gives them an opportunity to know the trends elsewhere in the world. Tap Enrol can get you admission in courses for part-time degree in Singapore has to offer.

 

These courses are helpful for people who don’t have the time to do full- time courses. These courses are good for working people who wish to get a degree to earn a promotion to the next level in their careers. Engineering colleges in Singapore offer courses in all streams of engineering.

 

These courses are of international standards and offer the students a good exposure to the practical use of their knowledge. There are also big companies in Singapore. Where you can seek an opportunity to do an internship. Tap Enrol can help you get into any of the engineering colleges.

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url 2018-06-06 11:11
Best Govt Polytechnic College in Delhi

Students pursuing engineering programs get more benefits. It is better to know the list of govt polytechnic college in delhi ncr. It is important to get a good job after polytechnic education. The institutes of technology and polytechnics have successfully made their mark. It is very easy to give the list of government polytechnic colleges in Haryana. It is because each institute is best. They follow the concept of applied science education.

Source: gpmeham.edu.in/blog
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