logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: Engineering
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-06-22 10:21
WE: ROBOT by David Hambling
WE: ROBOT: The robots that already rule our world - David Hambling

TITLE: WE: ROBOT: The Robots That Already Rule Our World

 

AUTHOR:  David Hambling

 

PUBLICATION DATE: 2018

 

FORMAT: ebook/ PDF

 

ISBN-13: 978 1 78131 805 8

___________________________________

 

NOTE: I received a copy of this book from NetGalley. This review is my honest opinion of the book.

___________________________________

 

From the blurb:

Robots exist all around us. They populate our factories, assist our surgeons and have become an integral part of our armed forces. But they are not just working behind the scenes – impressive inventions such as free-roaming hoovers takecare of your household chores and the iPal is set to become your closest friend.

David Hambling reveals the groundbreaking machines – once the realm of science fiction – that are by our sides today, and those that are set to change the future forever. From the Reem robocop that polices the streets of Dubai to the drones that deliver our parcels and even the uncanny Gemonoid Hi-4 built to look just like you, here are fifty unique robots that reach into every aspect of our daily lives.

We:Robot examines why robots have become embedded in our culture, how they work and what they tell us about our society and its future.

_____________________________________

 

In We:Robot, David Hambling discusses the myriad of ways that robots and humans already work together and what the future may hold for robot-human interactions.  He provides a variety of specific robotic examples under four categories:  robots at work, robots at war, robots in your life and robots beyond.  Each robot example includes a page sized diagram (and sometimes a photograph), its dimensions, construction material, power source, processor, year of first use and then a summary of the robot's history and uses.  

Examples of specific robots include:
(1) industrial robots such as those that help put cars together, those that are designed to pick strawberries, skyscraper window washers (aptly named the Gekko Facade Robot), pilotbots, the alpha burger-bot, and the robot that herds and milks cows!!;
(2) household, lifestyle and medical robots such as the Roomba "vacuum cleaner", the Automower 450X, the Da Vinci Surgical System, the kiddies entertainment unit (IPAL - not sure letting a robot raise your child is a good idea, but it's there!), bionic hands;
(3) war robots such as drones, the packhorse replacement packbot, exoskeletons; and
(4) robots in the future such as the robonaut, underwater dolphin robot, a remote controlled lifeguard robot, Curiosity Mars rover, the soft, squishy octobot, swarming kilobots, and the Dubai police robots.

I found this book to be particularly fascinating - I had no idea there were that many robots running around!  The writing style is clear and conversational, with no technobabble.  The illustrations are beautifully (and colourfully) rendered and accompanied by colour photographs of a selection of the stranger robots.

This is an interesting book that takes a look at some specific robots, how they work, how they fit into our lives and what the future holds for us and them.  I suspect even technophobes will find this book interesting.

 

Like Reblog Comment
text 2018-06-19 04:42
A Good Education Opens Doors To Great Jobs

Jobs are plenty these days for the one who has the qualification. The economy is good condition and companies across the globe are spreading their operations and recruiting more people. Despite automation in many sectors, the demand for human workforce has not decreased. In many sectors, there is an increase in demand for people. Companies look for people who are not just qualified but have passed out from good institutions. When there is a choice of candidates available, big companies choose the ones who have studied in institutions that are known for good, quality education.

 

A degree or diploma from a reputed university is highly valid in the job market. You all know how the big corporates go to big universities to get the best of the lot. Companies also don’t shy away from paying well for the right candidate. You can see how important education from a good university is. Singapore has some of the finest universities in the world and Tap Enrol can get you admission to any of these universities. We can also suggest you as to which university is good which courses.

 

Universities in Singapore follow the syllabus that is being followed by the world’s leading universities. These universities also give an opportunity for the students to have practical training while in college and also a chance to interact with students and faculty from other universities. This gives them an opportunity to know the trends elsewhere in the world. Tap Enrol can get you admission in courses for part-time degree in Singapore has to offer.

 

These courses are helpful for people who don’t have the time to do full- time courses. These courses are good for working people who wish to get a degree to earn a promotion to the next level in their careers. Engineering colleges in Singapore offer courses in all streams of engineering.

 

These courses are of international standards and offer the students a good exposure to the practical use of their knowledge. There are also big companies in Singapore. Where you can seek an opportunity to do an internship. Tap Enrol can help you get into any of the engineering colleges.

Like Reblog Comment
url 2018-06-06 11:11
Best Govt Polytechnic College in Delhi

Students pursuing engineering programs get more benefits. It is better to know the list of govt polytechnic college in delhi ncr. It is important to get a good job after polytechnic education. The institutes of technology and polytechnics have successfully made their mark. It is very easy to give the list of government polytechnic colleges in Haryana. It is because each institute is best. They follow the concept of applied science education.

Source: gpmeham.edu.in/blog
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-05-23 02:45
What's that joke about a gorilla and a typewriter?
The Murderer's Ape - Jakob Wegelius

I love a good Swedish to English translation (except for that one time I attempted Wallander) so I thought that The Murderer's Ape by Jakob Wegelius would be no exception. However, I cannot unequivocally state that I loved this book...or that I loathed it. The book is told from the standpoint of a gorilla who has been christened Sally Jones. She's been around humans her entire life and therefore not only understands what they are saying but can read as well. She's a gifted engineer who the reader discovers has the ability to figure out most mechanical devices be they accordions or airplanes. (This is integral to the storyline.) Her best friend is a (human) man she refers to as Chief and who took her on as a partner when he got his own ship. But all of this was before they ran into some trouble. Without giving too much away, the two are separated and Sally is forced to adapt in order to survive. At its heart, this is an adventure story with a lot of drama. What I enjoyed were the illustrations which were done by the author and accompanied the heading of each chapter as well as a gallery of character portraits at the very beginning. Some of the issues I had with this novel were in its dealings with race, religion, and ethnicity. It was hard for me to pinpoint if the problems I had could be explained by viewing it through the lens of the time in which the novel took place but I found them unsettling nonetheless. Overall, I wasn't totally blown away but I wouldn't throw it out of an airplane door either. 4/10

 

Source: American Library Association

 

Examples of the illustrations. [Source: Playing by the book]

 

 

What's Up Next: Golda Meir: A Strong, Determined Leader by David A. Adler

 

What I'm Currently Reading: The House With a Clock in Its Walls by John Bellairs

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-04-17 08:36
CONCRETE PLANET by Robert Courland
Concrete Planet: The Strange and Fascinating Story of the World's Most Common Man-Made Material - Robert Courland

TITLE:  Concrete Planet:  The Strange and Fascinating Story

             of the World's Most Common Man-Made Material

 

AUTHOR:  Robert Courland

 

DATE PUBLISHED:  2011

 

FORMAT:  ebook

 

ISBN-13:  978-1-61614-482-1

_______________________________________

 

From the blurb:

"Concrete: We use it for our buildings, bridges, dams, and roads. We walk on it, drive on it, and many of us live and work within its walls. But very few of us know what it is. We take for granted this ubiquitous substance, which both literally and figuratively comprises much of modern civilization’s constructed environment; yet the story of its creation and development features a cast of fascinating characters and remarkable historical episodes. This book delves into this history, opening readers’ eyes at every turn.

In a lively narrative peppered with intriguing details, author Robert Corland describes how some of the most famous personalities of history became involved in the development and use of concrete—including King Herod the Great of Judea, the Roman emperor Hadrian, Thomas Edison (who once owned the largest concrete cement plant in the world), and architect Frank Lloyd Wright. Courland points to recent archaeological evidence suggesting that the discovery of concrete directly led to the Neolithic Revolution and the rise of the earliest civilizations. Much later, the Romans reached extraordinarily high standards for concrete production, showcasing their achievement in iconic buildings like the Coliseum and the Pantheon. Amazingly, with the fall of the Roman Empire, the secrets of concrete manufacturing were lost for over a millennium.

The author explains that when concrete was rediscovered in the late eighteenth century it was initially viewed as an interesting novelty or, at best, a specialized building material suitable only for a narrow range of applications. It was only toward the end of the nineteenth century that the use of concrete exploded. During this rapid expansion, industry lobbyists tried to disguise the fact that modern concrete had certain defects and critical shortcomings. It is now recognized that modern concrete, unlike its Roman predecessor, gradually disintegrates with age. Compounding this problem is another distressing fact: the manufacture of concrete cement is a major contributor to global warming.

Concrete Planet is filled with incredible stories, fascinating characters, surprising facts, and an array of intriguing insights into the building material that forms the basis of the infrastructure on which we depend."

 

There isn't much to say about this book that hasn't already been mentioned in the blurb.  The book is a well-written, accessible and enjoyable history of concrete and some of the structures built with it.  I did feel the history of concrete in the 20th century dealt more with the people involved than what the concrete was actually used for.   It would also have been nice if the author had inserted chemical equations etc - at least as an appendix - but otherwise it's an informative book about the subject matter.

 

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?