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review 2018-03-28 10:51
Great characters, mind-bending twists and turns, and a fantastic ending.
The Fraud or Miracle Trilogy - Christoph Fischer

I have decided to review each story separately. So here goes…

First:

The Healer (Fraud or Miracle? Book 1)

by Christoph Fischer A psychologically astute book that will make you think about your own mortality. And what an ending!

I have read and reviewed a couple of the author’s books in the past and enjoyed them, and I was intrigued by this book when it came out, but due to my personal circumstances (my father suffered from cancer and died around the time of its publication) I didn’t feel I was in the best frame of mind for it. Now that it has been published as part of The Fraud and Miracle Trilogy, I was very pleased to receive a paperback copy and finally get to read it.

The story is deceptively simple. A woman suffering from terminal pancreatic cancer, desperate, follows the advice of her personal assistant and approaches a healer, Arpan. I am not sure if he would call himself a “faith” healer, but he insists that those he treats should be totally invested in the process, including transferring 50% of their assets to his account. Although he states all that money goes to charity, it caused suspicion and scandal years back, and he has been keeping a low profile ever since. After much insistence and a different deal, he agrees to treat Erica, who also has secrets of her own. There are strange conspiracies surrounding Arpan and his healing process but Erica’s life is changed forever. Things are not as they seem, of course.

The story is written in the third person from Erica’s point of view, and we get to share in her doubts, suspicions, paranoia, hope, and also to experience the healing with her. The book transmits a sense of claustrophobia, and although there are treks around the Welsh countryside and later we move to a different country, most of the story takes place within Arpan’s tent, and there are only a few main characters (mostly Erica (Maria), Arpan (Amesh), and Anuj) with some secondary characters that we don’t get to know very well (Hilda, Julia, Gunnar). There are no lengthy descriptions of settings or of the appearance of the characters, because we follow the point of view of a woman totally preoccupied with her health and her mortality, and that makes her not the most reliable of narrators. She describes the physical and mental effects that the illness and the healing process have on her, and we are also privy to her suspicions and doubts. The book offers fascinating psychological insights into how much our “rational” point of view can change when our life is at stake, and it is impossible to read it and not wonder what we would do in Erica’s place.

I kept thinking that the story, which relies heavily on dialogue (both between characters and also internal dialogue), would make a great play, and its intensity would be well suited to the stage. Although most of the characters are not sympathetic, to begin with, their humanity and the big questions they are forced to deal with make them intriguing and worthy subjects of our observations.

The ending brings a great twist to the story. Although I think most readers will have been suspicious and on alert due to the secrets, false information, continuous doubts, and different versions of the truth on offer, the actual ending will make them question everything and re-evaluate the story in a different light. And, considering the nature of the subject it deals with, that is a great achievement.

I recommend it to those who enjoy stories that make them think, to readers who are not searching for cheap thrills and prefer a psychologically astute book and especially to those who want to feel personally invested in the stories they read. I look forward to the rest of the books in the trilogy.

Second:

The Gamblers (Fraud or Miracle? Book 2)

My review:

This is the second book I read in the Fraud and Miracle trilogy, and its inclusion there is sure to put readers on their guard. But that is the beauty of it. You know something is going on, and you might even suspect what (although not, perhaps, in detail) but you can’t help but eagerly keep reading and follow the story, enmeshed in the same web of illusion and deceit that traps the main character, Ben.

The story is written in the third person and follows the point of view of Ben, the protagonist. He is a somewhat socially awkward young accountant who leads a modest life in London, who is not precisely streetwise, and who feels more at ease playing games in online communities than interacting socially in person. He is obsessed with numbers (in real life, I wondered if somebody with similar personality traits might fit into the very mild range of autistic spectrum disorder. He acknowledges that he is bad at reading people’s emotions and expressions, he is anxious in social situations and functions by imitating other people’s behaviour, he displays obsessive personality traits…) and does not believe in luck and chance. He is convinced that random events (like lottery or games of chance results) follow a pattern and he is determined to find it. He gets a bit lottery win (£64 million), and although he does not value money per se (at least at the beginning of the story), he decides to treat himself travelling to New York. Everything seems to change from that moment on, he makes a new friend (the glamorous and charming Mirco) and meets the girl of his dreams, Wendy.

The third person point of view suits the story perfectly. On the one hand, we follow Ben’s point of view and his thought processes. We are aware of his misgivings and doubts. He does not believe in luck, after all, and he cannot accept that all these good things are happening to him, especially as they seem to coincide with his lottery win. At the same time, the third person gives us enough distance to observe and judge Ben’s own behaviour (that does not always fit his self-proclaimed intentions and opinions) and also that of those around him. There are things that seem too good to be true, there are warnings offered by random people, there are strange behaviours (both, Mirco and Wendy, blow hot and cold at times), and there are the suspiciousness and rivalry between his new friends. We warm up to his naiveté and to his child-like wonder and enjoyment at the fabulous new life that falls on his lap, but we cannot help but chide him at times for being so easy to manipulate. 

The author reflects perfectly the process Ben goes through in his reading. Mirco keeps telling him that he should forget about methods and just “feel” the game, and despite his attachment to his theories, there is something in him that desperately wants to believe in miracles, in good luck, and, most of all, wants to believe that he deserves everything he gets: the money, the friendship, and the love. This is a book about con artists and the book implements their technique to perfection. Con-games are a big favourite of mine, and I love how well the book is designed, and how it treats its readers to a peep behind the scenes of the big players, while at the same time making them play the part of the victim. Yes, we might be shouting at Ben and telling him not to be so gullible, but what would we do in his place? Wouldn’t we just want it to be true too?

The story takes place in glamorous locations and it revolves around the world of high-stakes gambling, night-clubs, and big spenders. It might be particularly interesting to those who love casinos and betting, but that is only one aspect of the book. It can be read independently from the first book in the series, and although there are tense and emotionally difficult moments, there are no violence or extreme behaviours. And the ending… You might be more or less surprised by the big reveal, but the actual ending is likely to leave you with a smile on your face.

A book that will make you question yourself and that will keep you guessing until the end. A fun read for lovers of con-games and those who always wondered what they would do if their luck suddenly changed. I’m looking forward to the third book in the trilogy.

And third:

The Sanctuary on Cayman Brac: Key to the Truth (Fraud or Miracle? Book 3)

by Christoph Fischer Plenty of lessons to learn in a twisty mystery with a jaw-dropping ending

My review:

This is book three in the Fraud and Miracle Trilogy, and after reading it, I confess I’ll miss the characters and the twists and turns.

The series deals in subjects that seem more relevant now than ever. In a world dominated by fake news, where elections are doctored, and the future of a nation might be in the hands of people who manipulate data to benefit the highest bidder, the status of the information we take for granted, who deserves our trust and how far we would be prepared to go to learn the truth have become pressing matters we all must seriously think about.

Author Christoph Fischer brings together the cast of the two previous novels, delighting the many readers who felt, like Erica, that things were not settled and they wanted to know what would happen next. Had she really discovered the truth, and was she going to let it go at that? Like we did in The Healer, we follow Erica, who has managed to locate Arpan in Cayman Brac, and has decided to confront him, gun in hand. But, no matter how determined she is, she cannot resist the connection she felt to Arpan, and she accepts his version of the truth. Of course, that might be “his” truth, but is it what really happened? Erica once again cycles from belief to doubt and back again, and although her feelings for Arpan intensify, she needs to know if she was ever “healed” or not. Thanks to her insistence we get to meet Hilda, but like many other characters in the story, appearances can be deceptive.

Readers of the series will recognise some of the characters from The Gamblers and that will make them keep a close eye on what they do. But even with the advantage we have over Erica (we follow her and share in her clues, but have good reason to doubt some of the events, as we know who some of the students at Arpan school really are), the author once more keeps adding twists to the story, and the final reveal scene (worthy of an Agatha Christie novel) is as tense as any of the poker games in The Gamblers. I will not reveal the many bluffs, but if I had to summarise it I’d say… Wow.

I particularly enjoyed meeting Erica again. Although the nature of her healing might not be what she had initially expected, she is much more open and human, able to recognise her own limitations and weaknesses, and prepared to experiment and enjoy life. While some of the other characters might not have changed much (and continue to play for high stakes), others, like Ben, have learned their lessons and now focus on what really matters. Beyond the twists and turns of the plot, there are solid characters that grow and change throughout the series and we root for them and care for their well-being.

The island and the retreat, which we enjoy both as visitors and as participants thanks to Erica, are beautiful and inspiring and although most of us would find it difficult to cope with some of the rules and restrictions of the sanctuary, we’d all love to visit it and spend some time recovering and reenergizing. Personally, I would love to experience the inner workings of such a place and perhaps even to bear witness to some of the mind games.

A great ending to the trilogy, entertaining, satisfying, and surprising, that will leave readers feeling hopeful and confident. Sometimes the teachers are the ones who need to learn the lessons and letting go of control is the way to progress and evolve. My congratulations to the author.

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text 2018-01-23 12:59
An experienced, skillful securities fraud attorney and an investment fraud lawyer for Texans: Obtaining a recovery based on negligent misrepresentations

Stock prices have been moving upward for years.  From the perspective of some observers, including those who possess a minimal level of experience in the financial markets, there is no end in sight.  To them, downturns in the stock market are nothing but a distant memory.  Confidence reigns supreme!  Regrettably, some stockbrokers have unfairly taken advantage of these dynamics.  Stated otherwise, dishonest financial advisers have employed unethical practices so as to capitalise on the robust level of confidence that exists among stock market participants.  Succinctly put, they have gone to great lengths to portray themselves as seasoned investment professionals, but in reality, they have regularly imparted investment advice that can scarcely be viewed in a respectable light.  All too often, they have disregarded the professional obligations they maintain by steering clients into stocks that carry too much risk.  And, significantly, they have not disclosed such risks.

 

If a stockbroker acts in an intentionally deceptive manner, he – no doubt – engages in securities fraud.  Significantly, however, the Texas Securities Act provides for liability even if the underlying misrepresentations or half-truths are completely devoid of fraud.  Granted, hard core fraud can make a case more compelling, but it does not serve as a prerequisite to a financial recovery.  In Texas, liability can stem from negligent misstatements.

 

Over the years, manyTexas investors have fallen prey to dishonest stockbrokers.  In the process, they have become victims of securities fraud in Texas. Nonetheless, consistent with the discussion set forth above, Texas law recognizes that financial losses resulting from advice that is carelessly formulated can have equally devastating consequences.  To that end, it may provide for a financial recovery even if the evidence establishes nothing more than ordinary negligence.

 

If you live in Texas and you are in need of an experienced, successful investment fraud lawyer, contact Chris Bebel. He is a veteransecurities lawyer who has repeatedly targetedfinancial adviser fraud in Texas.  Once he “rolls up his sleeves” and digs into the case, he may determine that the underlying losses are not the product of fraudulent conduct, but as previously noted, that will not bar a recovery.

 

Chris Bebel has been focusing on securities fraud cases for over 30 years.  Along the way, he has served as a federal prosecutor and an SEC attorney.  Plus, he is the author of various securities fraud publications.  Mr. Bebel works closely with Bradley Ellison, a retired U.S. Air Force master sergeant who has earned three graduate degrees.  It is important to understand that the number of cases Mr. Bebel has rejected greatly exceeds the number of cases he has accepted.  Consequently, it is important that you highlight any facts that may warrant special attention.

 

Based on the extensive trial experience he amassed while serving as an Assistant U.S. Attorney, Mr. Bebel is no stranger to the courtroom.  To the contrary, he eagerly embraces the advantages that are offered by a courtroom setting.  Viewed in that light, it is fair to say that the scope of his practice differs substantially from securities lawyers who lack trial experience — and thus confine their work to the securities arbitration arena.  The depth and breadth of his experience makes Chris Bebel a uniquely qualified investment fraud attorney.  If you, or perhaps your parents, are a victim of financial adviser fraud, reach out to Chris Bebel, a distinguished Texas investors attorney who has repeatedly capitalized on his knowledge of the written and unwritten rules governing the securities industry while building a record of success.  And remember, a so-called securities fraud attorneycan utilize Texas law to win a case regardless of whether fraud is actually proven.

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text 2018-01-10 10:44
A Superb Securities Fraud Attorney With A Strong Success Record

Several generations ago, most retail stock market participants came from the wealthiest levels of society.  Suffice to say, the composition of stock market investors which exists today has gone through a radical transformation.  Under the current dynamics, ordinary citizens regularly buy and sell securities. On many occasions, these transactions encompass assets that have been set aside for retirement.  Recognising that many investors lack the requisite knowledge and experience to make astute decisions in the financial markets, fraudsters have displayed a tendency to take advantage of them. 

 

In doing so, they have regularly placed a special emphasis on initiatives that are designed to mislead elderly retirees.  If you are a victim of securities fraud, we are here to help.  Chris Bebel is a highly-regarded investment fraud attorney who can help you recover your losses. He practices in the areas of securities litigation, securities arbitration, financial fraud, breach of contract, and business disputes.

 

In recent years, Mr. Bebel has maintained a special focus on Ponzi scheme cases involving the sale of unregistered securities.  Framed in compact terms, the sale of those securities was permeated with egregious acts of deception and deceit.  Along those lines, scores of Texas investors were cheated in connection with the underlying private placement fraud (a/k/a private offering fraud); if full disclosure had been made, it is inconceivable that any of the sales would have taken place.

 

If you have sustained financial losses in connection with a Ponzi scheme, contact a seasoned Texas investors lawyer who has battled securities fraud for more than three decades.  Call Chris Bebel, a knowledgeable, experienced investment fraud lawyer who has achieved tremendous success in the courtroom, as well as the securities arbitration arena.

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text 2017-12-13 09:39
What You Need To Know About Securities Fraud

You work really hard to earn money to give your family a good life and secure their future. You put some money in fixed deposits, you purchase a house and you also put some money in securities. But when you lose your money because of a securities fraud, it will seem like the world is crumbling down around you. All the hard work you had put in, to raise the money that you had invested, gone in the blink of an eye!

 

What you might think has happened only to you, is actually something that can happen to a lot of people. As a matter of fact, this happens more often than most people realise, and millions of people lose their hard earned money to such frauds, every year, all over the world. If you are someone who has lost money in the recent past, then there are a few things that you need to know. The first thing you will have to do is report the fraud to the relevant authorities and then you will have to hire a securities fraud attorney.

 

 

With an experienced attorney by your side, you might actually have a fighting chance to get your money back. The attorney will be able to help you with all the details and will also be able to locate the loopholes in the documentation. They will tell you what your next steps should be, which could vary from talking to other people who have become victims of the same scam or meeting with the authorities. With your securities attorney, fraud should become a thing of the past soon enough for you.

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text 2017-08-18 13:15
Kevin Ryall from world.edu IS A FRAUD !!!

Hello to anyone who's reading this blog post. I would like to inform you that Kevin Ryall, a  wannabe administrator of the website at world.edu, is a fraud and a scammer who slanders honest people leeching money out of them for services that can be acquired for free! I advise you to stay away from such dishonest, ungrateful and simply loathsome people who have no respect for others.

 

Here is the contact information of this person:

 

Postal Address

 

World University LLC

942 Broadway Street, Suite 314C, Boulder, CO 80302, United States

 

Tel: +1 303 731 3427

 

or

 

PO Box 849, Nerang, Queensland, 4211, Australia

 

Tel: +61 7 5641 4587

 

Telephone Contact

 

USA: +1 303 731 3427

AUS/NZ: +617 56414587

UK: +44 20 8133 0537

 

Skype: worldedu

 

Don't let yourself be bullied by such hypocrites!

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