logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: French
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-03-14 15:57
Gives new meaning to "What's in the fridge?"
Lady Pancake & Sir French Toast - Josh Funk,Brendan Kearney

A few weeks ago, I read a book called Dear Dragon which was about a pen pal relationship between a little boy and a dragon but they had no idea they were writing to someone of a different species. The illustrations were on point but it was the storyline that had me looking to see what else the author had written. (His name is Josh Funk by the way.) Turns out he had another book by the snazzy title of Lady Pancake and Sir French Toast (with a sequel called The Case of the Stinky Stench due out on May 2nd). This book has fantastic illustrations by Brendan Kearney which truly bring the fridge food to life. If you're reading aloud to pre-school age children, I highly encourage you to have the kids make predictions and point out their favorite (and least favorite) food items. Otherwise, this book might be a bit of a daunting read-aloud because there are quite a few challenging words (and lots of them) per each page. It follows our two main characters, Lady Pancake and Sir French Toast, on an epic quest to reach the last drop of syrup remaining in the syrup bottle. Lots of ridiculous rhyming, competitive taunting, and delicious food items abound. 9/10 for frolicking foodie fun.

 

Note: If you do decide to use this as a storytime read-aloud and/or you utilize this in a lesson I recommend you check out Josh's website which has a free downloadable activity kit to complement the book.

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-03-12 17:43
#19 - Riquet à la houppe by Amélie Nothomb
Riquet à la houppe - Amélie Nothomb

Again, 5 out of 5 stars for this author. I just can't seem to get tired of her. All her books are really similar, and while the plot is never that important to me.. the way she writes is. It's amazing. She is one of the first author I was introduced to as a teenager and she gives me the love for words. Amélie Nothomb showed me how important words can be. And what you can make of them.

 

I read this book at the book fair in Bruxelles while waiting to meet her. The reading experience was thus so much beter (even if I was standing, hot and thirsty. I waited almost 3 hours, but it was worth it!). Meeting her was such a great experience. She is kind and takes the time to speak to every single person that wants to meet her. She also compliments people a lot and told me I was ravissante and that I seemed way much younger than I was. She also ALWAYS writes back if you send her a letter. She is a great writer but also seems like a great person.

 

(I guess it's also the first time I show my face here, hello)

 

As usual, this book was fanstastic. I cannot review any of her books, first of all because I won't be impartial, but also because I don't know what to say, except that her writing is extraordinary and that I loved every single word of it.

 

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-03-08 02:33
The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (Modern Library Volume 2 of 3)
The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Vol. 2 - D.J. Boorstin,Gian Battista Piranesi,Edward Gibbon,John B. Bury

The second volume of Modern Library’s three-volume reprint of Edward Gibbon’s The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire covers chapters 27 through 48 of the author’s vast magnum opus.  Beginning with the reign of Gratian and ending with the reconquests of Heraclius in 628 A.D., Gibbons relates in detail the political, martial, social, and theological developments that saw the ultimate split of the Roman Empire, the fall of the West, and the continuance of Roman tradition in the East centered in Constantinople before glancing at the lives of the next 60 emperors of Byzantium over the next 600 years.

 

The deterioration of the Rome picks up with the reign of Gratian and his eventual overthrow leading to the unification of the Empire under Theodosius the Great before its finale split with the inheritance of his sons and then their successors over the next 50+ years.  Throughout the era of House of Theodosius, the various barbarian tribes made inroads into the Western Empire which included two sacks of Rome itself by the Visigoths and Vandals, as the long ineffectual reign of Honorius and his successors allowed the Empire to slip out of their fingers.  In the vacuum arose the genesis of future European states such as England, France, and Spain while Italy declined in population and political cohesion as the Pope began to fill not only a religious but political role.

 

The Eastern Emperors in Constantinople, unlike their family and colleagues in the West, were able to keep their domain intact through military force or bribes to turn away.  The bureaucratic framework established by Constantine and reformed by Theodosius was used to keep the Eastern Empire thriving against barbarian incursion and Persian invasions while creating a link to the Roman past even as the eternal city fell from its greatness.  Yet as the Eastern Emperors kept alive the Roman imperial tradition while continually orienting it more towards Greek cultural heritage, the internal conflicts of Christianity became a hindrance to social and imperial stability leading to rebellions of either a local or statewide nature or allowing foreign powers to invade.

 

This middle volume of Gibbon’s monumental work is divided in two, the first focusing on the fall of the Western Empire and the second on how the Eastern Empire survived through various struggles and for a brief time seemed on the verge of reestablishing the whole imperium.  Yet throughout, Gibbon weaves not only the history of Rome but also the events of nomadic peoples as far away at China, the theological controversies within Christianity, and the numerous other treads to create a daunting, yet compete look of how Rome fell but yet continued.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-03-02 16:12
The Likeness
The Likeness - Tana French

The Likeness is the second book in the Dublin Murder Squad series. I liked it, but not quite as much as the first. The plot was very far-fetched, but I went in with that understanding. I suspended my disbelief and allowed myself to think, "OK, so if all the stars aligned in just the right way, something like this could possibly happen." 

 

The book did hold my attention and I wanted to find out who stabbed Lexie and if my guess were correct. The characters were complex and I thought they each had just the right amount of depth.

 

The primary issue I had with this book was the pace. It just felt like it dragged on way longer than necessary. It's possible my mood played a big part in my enjoyment of this. I had to start it late and wanted to get through it so I could get to other books I had on my list for last month. And I was sick. So, maybe I would have enjoyed the slower pace more had I not felt so impatient while reading it.

 

I'm looking forward to the next book in the series.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-02-28 13:58
Beginning French: Lessons from a Stone Farmhouse - Les Americains

This is the story of 2 Americans  (and their adult daughter) buying a holiday home in France  (Dordogne).And of course the expected ups and downs.The leaking pool, a wonderful nightmarket, plumbing problems, wine tasting opportunities,a different language ....bref,la France!

It is a fun read, scattered with recipes  (not great ones, just French ones).

The thing is, it has been done before, and quite well  (for example:A year in Provence by Peter Mayle),so yes, it is a sunny read but not an brilliant sunny one.

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?