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review 2017-07-16 22:18
Review: Crucible of Gold (Temeraire Book 7 of 9)
Crucible of Gold (Temeraire) - Naomi Novik

This is the seventh book in the Temeraire series.  I enjoyed it a lot, on about the same level as the previous books, and definitely more than the sixth one.  Unlike the last book, there weren’t as many unlikeable characters and I think that helped.  I don’t have too much else to write about -- just a couple comments within the spoiler tags.

 

 

I expect that Riley isn’t really dead and will show back up sooner or later.  When a fairly significant character dies, it’s usually made more obvious and definite.  I won’t be terribly disappointed if I'm mistaken; I don’t much care one way or another except for the sake of the characters who do care.  I haven’t cared much for him since his conflicts with Laurence in the earlier books.

 

I thought Granby was better developed in this book.  I enjoyed learning more about him and seeing him play a slightly more prominent role in the story.  I also was very happy to see him finally put his foot down with Iskierka.  I hope he doesn’t back down in the remaining books.

 

(spoiler show)

 

Even though it took me 9 days to read this, it was only a reflection of my work schedule and not of my enjoyment of the book.  I was on a business trip for a little over a week, with many 16-18 hour work days.  I read most of this book within three days; the rest of the days involved reading the same paragraphs over and over with my eyes while my brain thought about work until I gave up the attempt. :)

 

Next Book

Blood of Tyrants by Naomi Novik, the next book in the Temeraire series.

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review 2017-07-15 15:55
Morse goes temporarily missing...
The Way Through The Woods (Inspector Morse, #10) - Colin Dexter

Book 10/13 of the crime novels involving Chief Inspector Morse and I think on balance this is my favourite so far. Clearly, the fact that it won Colin Dexter the CWA Gold Dagger (again) in 1992, for the best crime novel of that year confers a gilt-edged pedigree, but within such an impressive series of high quality works of fiction (one might even call them ‘bodies of work’), this example stands tall.

 

On a rather random whim, Morse decides to take a holiday and notwithstanding his negative past experiences of such ventures, he books into The Bay Hotel, Lyme Regis, Dorset. The absence allows time for Morse to ponder a riddle spotted in 'The Times', apparently concerning the year-long police investigation into a 'Swedish maiden', missing in Oxford and follow the subsequent responses of editors and readers in the correspondence columns. At home, when the media starts asking questions, the absence of his star detective also confirms Superintendent Strange’s determination to place Morse in charge of the stalled investigation upon his return, even tasking DS Lewis with trying to entice Morse back early. And thus, amid such expectations the detective duo are back in harness.

 

In common with the other books in the series, Morse manages to lust over and make lasting impressions upon several interesting female characters. But, we also get to see more of the ‘below-the-waterline’ complexity of Morse in his self-imposed emotional isolation. This is particularly true when Morse hurries to see his colleague Max, in the hospital, but also in the unaccustomed warmth, which DS Lewis alone seems to rekindle. Indeed, once again it is Lewis who is the “catalytic factor in the curious chemistry of Morse’s mind.”

 

This book also introduces pathologist, Dr Laura Robson, for the first time. A feisty Geordie, the fair Laura quickly takes to verbal duelling with Morse, but the instant respect she has commanded also bodes well for how her relationship with the Chief Inspector (arch sceptic of the forensic sciences) will play out in the remaining volumes.

 

One of the interesting traits of Dexter’s work is the genteel veneer through which he filters the attendant brutality of violent crime. Morse rarely casts judgement, simply assembles the facts and dispassionately solves the presenting puzzle. In fact, what I regard as the ‘Oxford effect’, often gentrifies quite sordid circumstances and occasionally leaves Morse and his unrefined proclivities seeming quite tawdry by comparison. Still, in this novel, Morse seems more relaxed (perhaps an expression of holiday fever, or the reminder of his own mortality) and openly closer to Lewis. For example, Morse even entrusts his sergeant to interview the missing girl’s mother, dispatching Lewis to Stockholm. Albeit such delegation pragmatically side-stepped the Chief Inspector’s fear of flying, the decision also highlighted his dependence on the dogged efforts and boundless support of Lewis.

 

Again, Morse confidently posits a hypothesis based on the seemingly impenetrable array of facts, which in turn is dismantled by the developing evidence, only to be adapted anew as Morse sculpts out the truth, until the final explanation is revealed. In this case a very satisfying conclusion and the usual acknowledgement that you have to hand it to Morse - he is clever!

 

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review 2017-07-13 01:48
Love it!
Crucible of Gold (Temeraire) - Naomi Novik,Naomi Novik

There's so much going on here, and I kinda love Iskierka, and Granby's standing up to her finally!

 

The Inca, the ways the balance of power shift, and the way Novik balances action, characters, and humor is pretty amazing.   

 

Love, love, love.   I don't really want to write a long review so I can finish up my mini review flood now that my computer is up and running again - as in I can recharge it again - so I can finish Blood of Tyrants, which is one of my favorite books in the series.

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text 2017-07-09 23:01
Finished it!
Crucible of Gold - Naomi Novik

Wow, well that was certainly a lot better than the last book.

 

The previous installment definitely felt like one of those 'bridging' books where not a lot happens, but everyone needs to be put in the right place so that they are ready for the next set of events. And those events delivered big time.

 

Random thoughts with no spoilers: Iskierka isn't quite as annoying and Granby is awesome. Hammond is still a douche, and I can see major trouble ahead with Emily and Demane. Bring it on!

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