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review 2017-12-27 15:36
The Hunger Pains: A Parody (Harvard Lampoon) - The Harvard Lampoon

 

For more reviews, check out my blog Craft-Cycle

I read The Harvard Lampoon's, Nightlight, a few years ago and thought it was worth a few laughs so when I found this in the clearance section, I thought it was worth a try.

Unlike Twilight, I actually like The Hunger Games so I wasn't sure how this would go. However, I freaking loved this book. It was hilarious. Great mix of stupid and clever humor. The names were perfect (Cinnabon, Buttitch Totalapathy). It was like reading Captain Underpants for adults. Hilarious.

Yes, there were jokes made in poor taste (Pita's fatness, the Capital's "tranny" creations), but the book did not rely heavily on such ill-made punchlines. Overall, the book was filled with clever changes and funny critiques of popular YA literature (especially love triangles- what's with all the love triangles?). 

I also surprisingly enjoyed the new ending, probably more than the actual ending. Good read.
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review 2017-12-06 23:24
Hunger
Hunger: A Memoir of (My) Body - Roxane Gay

This book is heartbreaking, soul-baring, and gut-wrenching, but even through all of that, there is the tiniest spec of cautious hope, which I found amazing. Roxane Gay's story is not easy to read, but you need to read it. I was devastated, and shamed, and called out for my ignorance, thoughtless comments and occasionally averted eyes. I am not proud of any of this, but I was also given a path to understanding, and I will take it.

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review 2017-12-05 16:46
Hunger
Hunger - Michael Grant

Warning: There will be spoilers for book 1 in the series

 

 

This book takes place 3 months after the previous book ended. Food is running out and the kids are getting desperate. They are eating anything they can find. Boiling grass and weeds, random mushrooms, the occasional pigeon if one can be caught. Kids will do anything for food, including switching sides. Friends are turning on each other, allies are squabbling among themselves on all sides. Even though the children have figured out how not to blink out on their 15th birthdays, they are now considering giving up and letting it happen just to escape their misery.

 

Some kids are still developing new and unusual abilities, while normal kids are beginning to take a stand against those with powers. The challenges that Sam has to face, the pressures put on him by all the other children to make decisions and keep order really starts to wear him down. I couldn't help but feel bad for him. With constant threats from Caine and his crew, mutant coyotes and killer worms, there is also a creature living underground, controlling and manipulating some of the children. Getting into their heads and forcing them to do its bidding.

 

I read the Maze Runner a while back and I was unable to continue on with that series. The way the teens were portrayed, and how they spoke, was a big turn off for me. I was afraid this series might have a similar style, but despite the children making terrible and very dangerous decisions, I have really been enjoying the books and many of the characters.

 

There is no shortage of action in this book! There is so much going on in so many different places with different characters that my biggest complaint is that every time I get immersed in a scene and I need to know what happens next, Grant jumps over to a different group of kids and the second I get invested in the action with them, we are on to something else happening on the other side of Perdido Beach. It does exasperate me at times, but I love that there is so much action. I am never bored.

 

I'm definitely going to continue with this series. I need to know what will happen next. I recommend this series to anyone in the mood for action packed adventure.

 

 

-Shey

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review 2017-11-26 19:05
Singing Away the Hunger by Mpho 'M'atsepo Nthunya
Singing Away The Hunger: Life In Lesotho - Mpho 'M'atsepo Nthunya

“I dream that this book will go far, and tell people about the Basotho, how it is with us, how poor we are and how we go on with life anyway.”

This is an unusual memoir, consisting of the stories of a poor woman from Lesotho, matriarch of a large family, who works as a cleaning lady to feed her many children and grandchildren. Though she speaks seven or eight languages and attended some school as a teenager, she spent all of her adult life busy with manual labor and raising children and is essentially illiterate. She “wrote” this book in collaboration with an American professor, by telling her stories orally, having them read back to her and dictating changes.

It’s a fascinating book in that it offers a window on a sort of life rarely encountered even in books: not only the lives of a ordinary African woman and her family, but the lives of people so poor they often go hungry or inadequately clothed, and may not even have a home large enough for the entire household to sleep on the floor. When you do encounter characters living so hand-to-mouth, they populate a book that ends in triumph, usually through education. But the lives of Nthunya and her family always feel precarious, even when they’re doing well, working in South Africa or farming in the Maluti Mountains. This isn’t a relentlessly depressing book – life always goes on – but it isn’t a feel-good story either.

Nthunya’s isn’t simply a story of poverty, though. Born in 1930, she remembers a Lesotho that has largely disappeared, with customs that might surprise many readers. She describes what we would call an open relationship with her husband; both were comfortable with the other having outside sexual relationships, and this appears to have been normal. She also talks about what seems to be a romantic friendship with another woman, which is celebrated by the community through multiple feasts. Meanwhile Christianity mixes easily with traditional beliefs, including several episodes of visiting sangomas (traditional healers) for “sickness which is not from God,” usually involving a curse from a jealous relative or neighbor.

Overall, I found this short memoir very engaging. Nthunya’s way of speaking is distinctive, and I’m not entirely convinced that having her tell her stories in English was the best choice. She makes several references to being much more comfortable in her native tongue, and her English grammar is idiosyncratic. The book contains a somewhat defensive afterward by the professor who turned these stories into a book (I got the impression that zealously ideological social-justice-oriented acquaintances gave her a hard time for being involved at all), in which she explains that they tried having a bilingual friend take down Nthunya’s stories in Sesotho and translate them, but that this translation was “much less powerful” than Nthunya’s English. Maybe they just needed a better translator? But regardless, the stories flow well and offer a great window into a world rarely seen in print. This is the sort of experience I’m always looking for in my world books challenge, and I’m glad to have read it.

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review 2017-11-23 04:53
Hunger Makes the Wolf by Alex Wells - My Thoughts
Hunger Makes the Wolf - Alex Wells

Thank you SO much, KJ Charles for bringing this book to my attention.  I loved it!  :)  I have to say, I don't read everything that KJ recs, but I have found that the ones she recommends that catch my interest with the genre and blurb are never a disappointment.

The first half and a bit of the book was admittedly a bit slow.  Interesting but slow, I found.  We were getting to know the characters of importance, Hob, Mag, Nick, the Bone Collector etc... and learning some of the way Tanegawa's World works.  It's a mining world with some farm communities and one big city - I think.  In charge of the planet is Transrifts Inc., a mining company that holds most of the planet under its heavy heel.  The company also controls the mysterious people, the Weathermen.  These are also the people who have talents/abilities to facilitate rift space travel.

So, Hob, one of the main characters, is a young woman who is a member of a mercenary biker gang that lives apart from 'normal' society.  Exiles for the most part.  Hob is not native to the planet, she came by spaceship as a child, a stowaway type thing, I think I gathered, and was adopted by the leader of the bikers, Nick.  Nick also has a brother, who is a miner, a team leader if I'm not mistaken.  There's a wife and a daughter, Mag.  Mag is the other main character in the book and is as different as night and day from Hob, her adopted cousin.

Anyway, there are strange things afoot on Tanegawa's World and everything points to some sort of huge change for its inhabitants.  Rebellion?  Natural disaster? Further enslavery by the company?  God knows.  But when you get into the second half of the book, the action picks up and things get really, really good.  The characters come really alive now.  And rebellion/resistance is a trope that gets me every time.  There's some magic involved.  There are spies.  There are raids and assassinations and plots and mysteries afoot.  Hardly anything gets settled by the end of the book, but I didn't find that a problem.  It's a jumping off point, like the first, establishing season of a good TV series.  And this would make a great series, I think. The characters are rich with depth, and diverse, and they feel real, which is very important to me.

I can't wait to read the next one!  Which is out in February.

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