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Search tags: Irresistible
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review 2018-09-28 07:15
Success
Simply Irresistible (Flatiron Five) - Deborah Cooke

Tyler finds himself trapped in a mess of his own making.  He solves it by asking out the smart and beautiful Amy.  He has wanted to talk to her for a while.

 

Amy always feels like she is not enough.  She has trouble from her past that she hopes to never see again.  Will getting involved with Tyler's plan ruin everything?

 

Loved this story.  So excited to read the rest of the series.  These characters were so meant to be.  I loved the humor, the heat, and the sexy was out of this world hot!  I thought is was great and cannot wait for the next book in the Flatiron Five series.  I give this a 5/5 Kitty's Paws UP!

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review 2018-08-25 18:24
Tall, Dark, and Irresistible (Tall, Dark and Sexy #2) by Erika Wilde
Tall, Dark and Irresistible - Erika Wilde

 

In the heat of the moment a little white lie becomes a great big catastrophe. Erika Wilde takes an arrangement of convenience and turns it into a sensual delight. Peyton and Leo are romantic comedy gold. She lands herself in a situation that requires a helping hand from her secret crush. He's crazy enough to except the terms and accidentally in love ensues. Tall, Dark and Irresistible is boldly brash, cluelessly funny, irresistible entertainment.

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review 2018-07-26 15:19
Hockey Romance
Irresistible You (The Chicago Rebels Series Book 1) - Kate Meader

I don't read much romance, but I go into these periods where I want romance.  I admire romance writers because they seem to work the hardest.  I picked up the prequel to this series when a friend said it was free.  I read it and enjoyed it, so brought the first book.  Nine months or so later is when I get around to reading it.

 

The premise of the books is that three half sisters (including one long lost, just discovered sister) have inherited a hockey team from their dearly departed dad, who was really a smuck to at least two of them.  This, the first volume, is about the eldest sister, Harper, who while not a  hockey player dreams and desires to be a hockey manager of some type.  Part of the conditions on the will is that the three sisters who inherit the team must get the team to the playoffs in the first year or it will be sold.

 

Honesty, I picked this up because I liked Harper in the prequel.  She is somewhat more insecure here, which is okay because we tend to be more insecure in our hands than we let show.  Her true love is Remy, an older hockey player who really wants to win the Cup before he retires and plows seeds into a woman because he really wants that family.  Sadly, he finds himself traded to the last place Chicago Rebels, and that is not in his plans.  He doesn't care that the owner and acting GM is a woman, he just wants to be on a winning team.

 

The sex scenes are hot, even if the initial romance feels more like lust than anything else.  There is not real example of instant chemistry (though we are told that both feel it), but when they actually talk, the relationship works better.

 

For me the problem is the ending.  I know this is the first in a series, so the whole bit about the championship would be unresolved.  It's just the ending feels very, very rushed.  I get that's romance, but some of the decisions seem a bit slightly out of character - i.e. Harper giving up the amount of control that she does, there is no discussion of children, while his mother likes Harper she doesn't respond to Harper as a would be wife to her son and this is totally dropped.

 

It's not a bad book, but the ending was off.

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review 2018-06-07 19:21
Irresistible by Adam Alter
Irresistible: The Rise of Addictive Technology and the Business of Keeping Us Hooked - Adam Alter

This is a pop psych book that has its problems but still has interesting information to offer in an accessible package. I would change the subtitle to “The Rise of Behavioral Addiction in the Digital Age,” which more accurately describes the book’s contents. It is not all about screens – the author discusses exercise addiction frequently – and it is in no way an exposé of the tech industry, as the actual subtitle might lead you to believe. Rather than focusing on how companies suck people into their products, the author is focused on the nature of behavioral addiction itself, how it affects people, and the aspects of technology that most readily create addiction.

The book starts off by discussing behavioral addiction generally, whether it’s an addiction to email, social media, gaming, gambling, or exercise. Like chemical addiction, this is often something that fills a hole in a person’s life, and that the person comes to depend on to feel good (if the addiction is the only thing that causes the person’s brain to produce dopamine anymore) but that ultimately is detrimental to his or her life. The author then moves on to discuss elements that can make technology addictive:

1) Goals: Technology creates goals for us that we might not have formulated on our own, like walking a certain number of steps per day. This is especially true of exercise addictions. One dangerous idea is the Running Streak Association, which celebrates people who have run every day for a period of time (as in years or decades): people who didn’t want to lose their streak have gone so far as to run while the eye of a hurricane was passing over, or while injured or even in the hospital for a C-section.
2) Feedback: Games tell you how you’re doing and how close you are to your goals; when you post on social media or message boards, you can track how many people liked your post.
3) Progress: The author talks about the illusion of near wins and the fear of losing, but it seems to me that the illusion of actually accomplishing something is an especially addictive aspect to games and some social media, particularly for people who feel like they’re just spinning their wheels at work or otherwise.
4) Escalation: This is especially true of games; the game gets harder and you get better at it.
5) Cliffhangers: Discussed in the context of Netflix binges; people don’t like unfinished stories and loose ends. In fact, a story sticks out far more in our memories if we don’t hear the end.
6) Social interaction: Keeps people on social media, and playing social games like World of Warcraft.

All good to be aware of, but the book’s message tends to get a little muddled. The author talks about “the addict in all of us” and how the average office email sits unread in the recipient’s inbox only 6 seconds, but then writes at length about a World of Warcraft addict who played 20 hours a day for 5 weeks straight before committing himself to a detox clinic. Detailing such extreme examples tends to make everyday overuse seem like not such a big deal, and repeatedly returning to the clinic and its methodology throughout the book isn’t especially useful for people whose technology dependence doesn't rise to the level of requiring a residential treatment program. 

Wearable fitness devices are criticized throughout the book for promoting addiction (an exercise addiction psychologist, who unsurprisingly sees the people who are damaged by them, is quoted as saying no one should use wearables ever). Then in the final pages the author acknowledges that a device meant to increase motivation to exercise is likely to be helpful for those who need motivation, though potentially dangerous to those who are already motivated. Given that according to his numbers that 61-67% of Americans, Brits, Germans, Australians and others are overweight, perhaps he shouldn’t have slammed the fitbits quite so hard.

But suddenly in the last chapter gamification is presented as a solution to everything, when the entire preceding book was about why game addiction is bad. Sure, FreeRice promotes learning and donates ad revenue to feed the hungry, but it’s still a virtual game that creates artificial goals and uses progress and escalation to keep people hooked. Suddenly that’s okay if it’s for a good cause? I thought the point was that we were supposed to try to disconnect and focus on more meaningful things? What is the point, exactly? There isn’t a cohesive thesis here so much as a variety of interviews, studies and observations around a general theme.

Still, that doesn’t necessarily make a bad book; it’s informative though lightweight and sometimes confused in its presentation. If nothing else, it will probably make you reflect on the role of technology in your life, which is a good thing to check in on every now and then.

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review 2018-04-09 00:00
Irresistible You (The Chicago Rebels Series Book 1)
Irresistible You (The Chicago Rebels Series Book 1) - Kate Meader Hmmm, let me be crisp on this review. There was really nothing to do about this book. It was well-written, the characters were all just enough, the book was just enough, I didn't get Remy for about 30% but once I did he was sweet, and the book could've easily wrapped at 63%. Seriously, at 63% we know that Remy wants to retire after the season, settle down and be a stay at home dad. Harper has ambitions and wants to continue to build the Chicago rebel hockey team. Maybe to prove she can, maybe cause she's in love with it. She needs a man to support that or no man at all. I feel like I needed to smack both their foreheads at this point and say "time to discuss the future you idiots." It's a case of a slightly over mediocre book, which I read at a slightly bad time. (See: whole post on book grouchy)

I have to be honest, I had some stuff going on today, was quite busy and when I sat down to read I had no earthly clue what CR I was reading initially. I actually thought I might be between books. It was about a second before the book opened I remembered. I just think that's probably not the best sign...

Oh, but maybe I'll review it. It was a boss-employee relationship but the woman is the boss, and the man is the pursuer, generally. Nothing about this tickled my fancy including the sweaty locker room scene with, in all likelihood, pads still on. Light references to puck bunnies.

I have a crush on the actual interesting character, Bren, in this book. I also find her sisters interesting.
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