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review 2018-01-02 22:09
This one was surprisingly good...
Game Point - M.J. O'Shea,Kenneth Grahame

It's been a while since I've read a book by M. J. O'Shea so when the opportunity to review this one came up I was more than happy to give it a go. I'm always enjoyed books by this author and 'Game Point' has turned out to be no different. 

 

Quinn Valenzuala is a trust fund  baby. He leads the jet set life. Never staying in one place for to long until he jets off with his friends Hunter and Dane to the next party. He's foot loose and fancy free and has no interest in changing this. But when Quinn's mother calls him home with the news that his grandfather has died. Quinn begins to wonder if maybe it's not time for a change.

 

Porter Davis is the COO of the sporting goods company that Quinn's family owns a company that his grandfather has poured his heart and soul into and one that Porter had assumed would be passed on to Quinn's mother and not the jetsetting playboy that Porter would prefer go back to his carefree lifestyle and leave the running of Sparta Athletics to those more qualified.

 

When Quinn returns home he realizes that he's missed his mother and his home...that maybe it's time for him to put down some roots and accept that task that his grandfather has charged him with.

 

'Game Point' is truly an enemies to lovers story. Porter's determined not to like or give Quinn a chance. Quinn becomes equally as determined to make it work and become a business person his grandfather would be proud of and to prove to Porter that he's more than just a playboy with no real purpose in life. 

 

Little by little Quinn changes Porter's mind showing Porter that not only can he do the job but Porter can count on him when he needs too and not just in the boardroom...nope, Quinn and Porter discover that they like each other and they becomes friends...very, very good friends with benefits. Which is all well and good until Porter realizes that what he feels for Quinn is a whole lot stronger.

 

This ones a slow burn...very, very slow and that works because these men have to get over the deaths of someone they both care about very much and adjust to the changes that brings to both their lives before they can even begin to get to the process of learning about each other, getting to know each other but get to know each other they do and things progress from friendship to friends with benefits in due course.

 

I like how Quinn and Porter balance each other. While Quinn wants to learn about his grandfather's company and actually contribute to it's operations he also adds a lighter side to Porter's life getting him to do something besides work when Quinn accepts his offer of friendship and the two men begin to spend time together outside of the office. At the same time Porter brings balance to Quinn allowing him to see that there's more to life than being a playboy and that life can be enjoyed and appreciated even if it's not all just one big party. 

 

Quinn and Porter are not just good together...they're good for each other and the only thing that I would have changed about this story if I could would have been to make the ending a bit longer...maybe, an epilogue showing them a few months down the road...sharing their first Christmas...but maybe it's just the time of year making me think this.

 

*************************

An audio book of 'Game Point' was graciously provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

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review 2017-07-31 18:53
The Reluctant Dragon - Inc. Blackstone Audio, Inc.,Bruce Blau,Susan McCarthy,David Thorn,Kenneth Grahame,Full Cast

Why did I read it? I had read The Wind in the Willows when I was a child, and only recently discovered that Kenneth Grahame had authored other books, about which I was unaware. This story sounded interesting.

 

What's it about? Two children are following footprints in the snow, when a neighbour calls them in for warming tea, and begins to tell them the story of the friendship between a boy, and a dragon living in a cave up on the Downs.

 

What did I like about it? It's a very nice, old fashioned story for children. Very English.

The audio was clear, without any errors.

 

What didn't I like? I think I may have chosen an awful audio version to which to listen. It was a full cast production, but with American actors, and, honestly, it spoilt all the fun of the story. I think if it had been a cast with English accents, it might have been better.

 

Would I recommend it? Oh yes, but not this particular edition. A great bedtime story I imagine.

 

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review 2017-06-05 14:53
The Wind in the Willows
The Wind in the Willows - Kenneth Grahame,Gillian Avery

I just ended up reading this since the book hold I had on Watership Down is not moving at all. I will be lucky to read that book by the end of summer at this rate.

 

I haven't read this book since I was a kid and it's cute enough now but of course as an adult I just didn't have the same feeling of enchantment that I did when I was a kid. The illustrations were nice to read though.

 

Bank:
April 15: $20
April 17: $23. I read "The Wangs Vs the World", electronic pages 368.
April 24: $28. I read "Dream Wedding", electronic pages 512.
April 25: $28. Landed on BL and had to post a vacation photo or tell a story about a vacation.
April 29: $31. Read "Whitethorn Woods", 354 pages Kindle edition, $3.00
April 29: $34. Read "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep", 256 pages;$3.00.
May 4: $37. Read "The Ghost Brigades" Paperback, 346 pages; $3.00
May 8: $42. Read "American Gods" Hardcover, 465 pages; $5.00.
May 8: $45. Read "Moon Called" 298 pages Kindle edition; $3.00.
May 13: $50. Read "Solitude Creek" 434 pages electronic; $5.00.
May 14: $53. Read "No Country for Old Men" 320 pages Kindle edition; $3.00
May 19: $56. Read "The Witches: Salem, 1692" 384 ebook; $3.00
May 30: $59. Read "The Good Earth" 372 pages ebook: $3.00

June 4:  $62. Read "The Wind in the Willows" paperback edition, 256 pages: $3.00

 

 

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review 2017-04-06 23:11
The Wind in the Willows
The Wind in the Willows (Illustrated Classic Editions) - Malvina G. Vogel,Kenneth Grahame

The Wind in the Willows by Malvina Vogel is an edited version of Kenneth Grahame's original story. The book is a 5.2 on the Accelerated Reading leveling system. The story follows the lives of animals that exist and survive much like people. They must overcome obstacles that are both serious and funny that many humans face each day. This would be a great story for a reading nook. This book could be used in a fairy tale unit. It could also be used to teach students how to overcome obstacles creatively without giving up.  

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review 2017-02-21 00:00
The Wind in the Willows
The Wind in the Willows - Kenneth Grahame My spouse tried to throw some cold water on my Moomin infatuation and challenged me to read "the good stuff", e.g. The Wind in the Willows or Winnie The Pooh. I have a vague recollection that The Wind in the Willows wasn't read in my family when I was young. The family myth is that it was one of my father's favorite books, but that he tried reading it to my older brother when he was too young for it. So, my father didn't bother reading it to my sister and me when we came along. Interestingly, my older brother turned into an English major. You'd think he would have shown an appreciation of good literature at a very early age.

I do have a vague recollection that I might have read this to my daughter, but I'm guessing that if I had, it was one of those "as told by" versions. Anyway, I'm a bit at a loss as to what to say. In some ways, I'm hard pressed to see this as a children's book because the writing is so beautiful, with vocabulary and imagery somewhat above the head of your average 11-year old. I might be selling 11-year olds short. It's been so long since I was one or since I had one living in my house. In another six years, I might again know what 11-year olds are like, but I'll also likely be descending into senility by the time my grandson turns 11. Also, he'll likely not be spending nearly so much time at our house by then (in part, we hope, because his father will likely no longer be living in our basement).

Anyway, this is an absolutely wonderful book. It begins with mole getting tired of spring cleaning and going off on a ramble across the fields. He reaches the river and meets up with a water rat. They become best friends. What ensues are a number of adventures involving a rather egotistical and foolish toad, a clever badger, an otter and a number of other creatures. The adventures are fun and the descriptions of the settings is lyrical. The subject matter is the stuff of kids' books, but the writing is pure gold for adults.
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