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review 2018-12-10 01:06
The wonderful characters more than make up for the implausible elements of the plot.
Unloved, a love story - Katy Regnery

๏ ๏ ๏  Book Blurb ๏ ๏ ๏ 

 

 

My name is Cassidy Porter...

 

My father, Paul Isaac Porter, was executed twenty years ago for the brutal murder of twelve innocent girls.

 

Though I was only eight-years-old at the time, I am aware - every day of my life - that I am his child, his only son.

 

To protect the world from the poison in my veins, I live a quiet life, off the grid, away from humanity.

 

I promised myself, and my mother, not to infect innocent lives with the darkness that swirls within me, waiting to make itself known.

 

It's a promise I would have kept...if Brynn Cadogan hadn't stumbled into my life.

 

Now I exist between heaven and hell: falling for a woman who wants to love me, while all along reminding myself that I must remain...

 

Unloved.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

๏ ๏ ๏  My Review ๏ ๏ ๏ 

 

At first, the narration took some getting used to, especially for Cassidy's voice, with his Maine accent.  Eventually, I did get used to it, which is probably due to the insane amount of love that I had for this guy.  The feels, OMG!  (Maybe, I was partial to Cassidy because I really love that name, after all, I named my daughter Cassidy.)

 

Seriously, I loved these characters, both Cassidy and Brynn pull at the heartstrings, and I was totally rooting for them...and then the twist at the end comes about and I kind of felt like it was a little too much to believe.  But all in all, I couldn't let it take my love for this story away.  

 

 

๏ ๏ ๏  MY RATING ๏ ๏ ๏ 

 

4.3STARS - GRADE=A-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

๏ Breakdown of Ratings ๏ 

 

Plot⇝ 4.2/5 
Main Characters⇝ 5/5
Secondary Characters⇝ 4/5
The Feels⇝ 4.3/5
Pacing⇝ 4/5
Addictiveness⇝ 5/5
Theme or Tone⇝ 4.3/5
Flow (Writing Style)⇝ 4/5
Backdrop (World Building)⇝ 4.7/5
Originality⇝ 4/5
Ending⇝ 4/5 Cliffhanger⇝ Nope.
๏ ๏ ๏
Book Cover⇝ It's a bleeding heart...for crying out loud.
Narration⇝ ☆4☆ for Maxine Mitchell & Joe Arden, I definitely liked the female voice more than the male voice.
Setting⇝ Mount Katahdin, Maine
Source⇝ Audiobook (Scribd)
๏ ๏ ๏
Goodreads
Amazon
Booklikes

 

 

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text 2018-12-02 16:38
November 2018-That's A Wrap!
Exorcist Falls: Includes the Novella Exorcist Road - Matt Godfrey,Jonathan Janz,Jonathan Janz
Teeth - Kelli Owen
Agent to the Stars - John Scalzi
Bird Box - Josh Malerman
Exit Strategy - Martha Wells
Welcome to the Show: 17 Horror Stories – One Legendary Venue - Somer Canon,Rachel Autumn Deering,Brian Keene,Jeff Strand,Matt Hayward,Glenn Rolfe,Patrick Lacey,Matt Serafini,Adam Cesare,Jonathan Janz,Kelli Owen,Doug Murano,Mary SanGiovanni,Robert Ford,Bryan Smith,Booth Tarkington,John Skipp,Alan M. Clark
The Freak Show Murders - Fredric Brown
Greatest Love Story Ever Told, The - Megan Mullally,Nick Offerman
The Mirror of the Nameless - Leesa Wallace,Graeme Parker,Luke Walker
The Book of Etta (The Road to Nowhere 2) - Meg Elison

I read 10 books this month!

 

Audiobooks

 

 

Exorcist Falls by Jonathan Janz, narrated by Matt Godfrey 4.5*

Agent to the Stars by John Scalzi, narrated by Wil Wheaton 4.5*

The Greatest Love Story Ever Told by Megan Mullally and Nick Offerman 3*

The Book of Etta by Meg Elison, narrated by  Adenrele Ojo 4*

 

Total: 4

 

ARCS/Reads for Review

 

Teeth by Kelli Owen 4*

The Mirror of the Nameless by Luke Walker 5*

 

Total: 2

 

RANDOM READS

 

Bird Box by Josh Malerman 4*

The Freak Show Murders and Other Stories by Fredric Brown 4*

Welcome to the Show edited by Doug Murano 4.5*

Exit Strategy Martha Wells 5*

 

 

 

 

 

Horror Aficionados Mount TBR Challenge:

Challenge: Read 40 Books Already on my TBR

 

(I'm failing miserably)

 

1. City of the Dead by Brian Keene

2. The Warblers by Amber Fallon

3. October by Michael Rowe

4. It's A Bad, Bad, Bad, Bad World by Curtis Lawson

5. Bad Pennies by John Leonard

6. Cold in July by Joe Lansdale

7. Sea of Rust by C. Robert Cargill

8. Dandelion Wine by Ray Bradbury

9. Hex by Thomas Heuvelt

10. Bird Box by Josh Malerman

 

Running Total: 144

Total Goal: 150

 

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review 2018-11-21 18:45
THE GREATEST LOVE STORY EVER TOLD by Megan Mullally & Nick Offerman
Greatest Love Story Ever Told, The - Megan Mullally,Nick Offerman

 

Confession time: I don't watch, and have never watched, Will & Grace or Parks and Rec. I'm not sure why, exactly, because I thought I liked Megan Mullally and I DO enjoy Amy Poehler. Anyway, I thought I'd give this audio book a go and it ended up being just okay.

 

Someone who watches these shows or has a real fangirl thing going on for Nick Offerman and/or Megan M. might get more out of this book than I did. Megan and Nick talk about their pasts, how they met, their careers, how they manage to keep things fresh, and how they like to do jigsaw puzzles and listen to audiobooks while they do so.

 

To be honest, this book reminded me why I don't read romances and why I love horror. These two are cute, but after only a little while, they became too cute for me and I would have loved to see them, (or in this case, hear them), die horrible and painful deaths. Well, not really, but they were just too....sappy. I don't like sappy.

 

So there you have it. I thought this book was okay, but if you're a big Megan Mullally or Nick Offerman fan you're likely to get a lot more out of this too cute, sickeningly sweet book.

 

*Thank you to my awesome public library for the free loan of this audiobook. Libraries RULE!*

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text 2018-11-09 00:59
Reading progress update: I've read 10 out of 320 pages.
Greatest Love Story Ever Told, The - Megan Mullally,Nick Offerman

 

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review 2018-10-04 14:48
A love letter in the guise of a horror book dealing with a painful topic. Highly recommended.
Creature (Fiction Without Frontiers) - Hunter Shea

Thanks to NetGalley and to Flame Tree Press for providing me an ARC copy of this novel that I freely chose to review.

I have read great reviews of this author’s books, all in the horror genre, and a recent one (by Char Horror, whose reviews I follow on BookLikes) convinced me to read one of his novels. I was lucky enough to find it on offer at NetGalley, and yes, the reviewers were right. It is a book worthy of reading.

It is difficult to review this book without giving too much of the plot and possible spoilers away. If I had to define this book, I’d say it is a love letter. I know it might sound strange when we are talking about a horror book, but there you have it. Of course, there are many elements of horror as well, but from reading some of the comments I guess this is a far cry from the author’s usual romp-and-munch monster books (or “cryptozoological”, as he defines them). There is a monster, well, a creature, although it comes in quite late in the book (we do feel some dark presence well before that, though), but this is a story that starts as a domestic drama and shares many of its elements. The protagonists, Kate and Andrew, are a young couple. Their life is completely taken by the wife’s chronic autoimmune and genetic illnesses (Ehlers-Danlos and lupus) and what it takes to keep her alive. She is a virtual prisoner at home and most of the time she struggles to even get out of bed. Her husband has a job but spends most of his spare time looking after his wife, and the rest of the time thinking about her. They have a dog, Buttons, who keeps watch over Kate, and she survives thanks to cocktails of pain relief medications, experimental treatments that bring on their own kind of hell, watching black and white movies and the support of her husband. When he manages to secure a few weeks off and a cottage by a lake in Maine, they both hope they will have a reprieve and a break from real life. Unfortunately…

The book, written in the third person, alternates the points of views of wife and husband, and the author is very skilled at describing the feelings of the couple, the effects of the illness, both physical and psychological (although Kate is the perfect example of the unreliable narrator, due to her illness and the pain-killers and other medications she takes, she is very articulate and finds ways to explain her symptoms that make us share in her suffering more vividly than many scare books) on both, and the toll it takes on a relationship to have to battle with such terrible monsters day-after-day. Yes, there are “real” monsters and also the illness, which is more monstrous, in many ways, than any monster, because it lives inside and it feeds off the person, literally. It is evident on reading it that the author has close and deep knowledge of the subject, and this is confirmed later in the afterword, which I found very moving.

The characters, which include the couple, Kate’s brother, Riker, and British sister-in-law, Nikki, are sympathetic, likeable, but also realistically portrayed, especially the central couple. If at times Andrew seems almost saintly in his patience and never-ending acceptance of his caring role, there are times when he gives way to anger, frustration, and a touch of egotism and selfishness. He also acknowledges that after so long battling with his wife’s illness, he might no longer know how to be anything else but her husband and carer. Kate is in and out of medication-induced slumber, at times hides things from Andrew, is not always wise and takes unnecessary risks, at least from her husband’s perspective. Theirs is not a perfect relationship, but considering the strain they labour under, it is pretty amazing in its strength and solidity.

The novel is claustrophobic despite its location and the brief excursions into nature. We are mostly reduced to the inside of the house/cottage, and to a single room most of the time, and that adds to the feeling of anxiety and tension that increases slowly but ramps up towards the end of the story. I kept thinking about Stephen King’s Gerald’s Game because of the location, and the way the story plays with the power of the mind to conjure up ghosts and monster from the dark recesses of our consciousness, but the background and the central theme are very different.

What about the creature? I am sure readers of horror will wonder from early on what the nature of that presence is. At first we have unexplained attacks on the couple and they do try to find rational explanations to allay their fears (and at some points, it looks as if the story is going to bear off into home invasion ground), but eventually, a not-easy-to-explain-away-rationally creature appears. What this creature is and where it comes from is something you can decide for yourselves, although there are clear indications and even explanations offered during the novel that make sense within the context. I did suspect what might be behind it from quite early on, but it is very well done and it fits into the logic of the story (however we might feel about horror and its hidden meaning).

Now, some notes of caution. There is a scene where the characters exchange jokes in poor taste, which might offend readers (yes, even horror readers), and although people in extreme situations might find refuge in pretty dark humour, there are topics that many people find disturbing. There is also quite extreme gore and explicit violence, although I don’t think that would put off fans of the genre.

As mentioned, this is not a standard horror book and it might be enjoyed by readers interested in domestic drama, chronic illnesses, and great writing, if they have a strong enough stomach to deal with the gore. There are also questions and answers at the end that would make the book suitable for book clubs interested in the genre and the central topic. Although I know this is not perhaps a typical example of Shea’s writing, I am impressed and intend to catch up on some of his other books, and his podcast. Hats off to him for his bravery in tackling this difficult subject, and I hope it was as therapeutic for him as he states.

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