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Search tags: M.C.A.-Hogarth
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text 2019-01-13 03:31
Reading progress update: I've read 22 out of 128 pages.
Celebrating Britain: Canaletto, Hogarth ... Celebrating Britain: Canaletto, Hogarth and Patriotism - Steven Parissien

Bernado Canal had a son whom he named...Bernado...and hence was nicknamed Canaletto, "Little Canal" - a monicker that has stuck for circa 300 years, because the little Bernado became probably Italy's greatest ever painter of views. He spent more time working in Britain than Van Gogh spent painting in his lifetime (nine years).

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text 2018-11-23 09:06
24 Festive Tasks: Veterans' Day/Armistice Day, Task #3
The Complete Sherlock Holmes - Arthur Conan Doyle
The Complete Sherlock Holmes - Arthur Conan Doyle
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Arthur Conan Doyle,Paul Hogarth
The Annotated Sherlock Holmes Volume 1 and 2 - William S. Baring-Gould, Arthur Conan Doyle
Sherlock Holmes: The Definitive Collection - Arthur Conan Doyle,Stephen Fry
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Arthur Conan Doyle
The Speckled Band - Arthur Conan Doyle
A Study in Scarlet / The Hound of the Baskervilles - Arthur Conan Doyle
The Hound of the Baskervilles - Illustrated - Arthur Conan Doyle
A Study in Scarlet - Joseph Bell, Arthur Conan Doyle

Task 3:  Tell us: What author’s books would you consider yourself a veteran of (i.e., by which author have you read particularly many books – or maybe even all of them)?

 

I'm a completist and a re-reader-ist so there are a few authors I could use for this task, but really there can be only one.  And he's Scottish, so the possibly obscure movie/TV reference works.

 

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.  Sherlock Holmes.  The former one of only two authors I'd go out of my way for the chance to have dinner with (assuming death is not an obstacle) and the latter my numero uno literary hero.

 

I have read the entire Sherlock Holmes canon multiple times and as you can see above, I own several editions of both the complete works and individual titles.  I'm pretty sure they're just the beginning too, because if I thought it was hard to pass by additional editions of Jane Austen's works (I have at least 2 of all her works, 3 of some, and I think I'm up to 4 P&P editions) it's downright impossible for me to pass by a good Sherlock Holmes - especially an older edition.

 

Even though I've read all the stories at least 4 times, there is a lot I learn every time - things I've forgotten or overlooked, or simply 'get' because of new life experiences.  This makes me hesitant to go toe-to-toe with anyone over most of the stories themselves, but I definitely consider myself enough of a 'veteran' to wade into any conversation about Holmes and Watson as characters with confidence.

 

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text 2018-11-21 08:40
24 Festive Tasks: Diwali, Task #4
Vinegar Girl: A Novel (Hogarth Shakespeare) - Anne Tyler
Four Funerals and Maybe a Wedding - Rhys Bowen
Ham Bones - Carolyn Haines
Dark Road to Darjeeling - Deanna Raybourn
Sleeping With Anemone - Kate Collins

Task #4:  During Diwali, people pray to the goddess Lakhshmi, who is typically depicted as a beautiful young woman holding a lotus flower.  Find 5 books on your shelves (either physical or virtual) whose covers show a young woman holding a flower and share their cover images.

 

93 pages of book covers later, it turns out I actually had 5 books with women holding flowers on their covers.  After seeing the struggles others have had, I was delightfully surprised.  Though I would have been even more delighted had I not had to look through 93 pages to find them.

 

 

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review 2018-08-21 03:38
New Boy
New Boy (Hogarth Shakespeare) - Tracy Chevalier

I've read several of Chevalier's books, so when I saw this one offered on NetGalley, I jumped at the chance to get a copy. After reading two other books in the Hogarth Shakespeare series, Vinegar Girl and Hag-Seed, I was curious to read Chevalier's take on Othello. I think this is a departure for Chevalier, whose historical fiction I love, but I am not sure what she intended here. Her protagonists are reimagined as 11-year-olds, and the drama occurs over the course of one school day, with most of the action taking place on the playground. For me, this format diminished the impact of the story. I am not sure why Chevalier set this in the '70s, especially when the words and actions of her characters seemed more in line with today's kids, as opposed to the much less eloquent and exceedingly more immature kids I remember, having been an 11-year-old in the '70s.  

 

To be fair, Chevalier on her worst day is significantly better than so many other published writers, that of course I finished reading it, and I have no regrets. Now, on to her other books on my TBR pile...

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review 2018-06-08 15:41
Macbeth / Jo Nesbø
Macbeth (Hogarth Shakespeare) - Jo Nesbø

He’s the best cop they’ve got.

When a drug bust turns into a bloodbath it’s up to Inspector Macbeth and his team to clean up the mess.

He’s also an ex-drug addict with a troubled past.

He’s rewarded for his success. Power. Money. Respect. They’re all within reach.

But a man like him won’t get to the top.

Plagued by hallucinations and paranoia, Macbeth starts to unravel. He’s convinced he won’t get what is rightfully his.

Unless he kills for it.

 

 

My enjoyment of this book suffered greatly from a case of bad timing—it came in at the library when I was in the mood for lighter, happier reading. And yet, I’d waited many weeks for it and there were 60 people behind me in line, so I felt duty bound to read it and pass it on. Perhaps I should have returned it and rejoined the line of holds.

Macbeth is a dark, bloody story. Jo Nesbø is expert at dark and bloody plot lines. This is a match made in hell. But I came to realize that when I watch Shakespeare’s version, I am insulated. There are kings and thanes and witches and iambic pentameter, none of which occur in my regular life and I’m able to distance myself from the violence, the blood and the back stabbing. This version, set in a modern town and police department, removed that cotton wool and exposed my nerve endings! During the first third of the book, I had a difficult time picking it back up after a break, because I knew the basic story line and knew that death and destruction were coming. Seeing it in modern terms, with modern weapons, in a current setting somehow made it so much worse and made it so much more relevant to a 21st century reader.

In Nesbø’s version, Macbeth is the successful head of a SWAT team in a town seething with corruption, double dealing and drugs. Everyone is on the take, it seems, if the price is high enough. Macbeth, orphan child, former circus performer, recovering addict, has come up in the world and is poised to go even higher. His love, Lady, has similarly come up from violence and poverty to now own a large and successful casino.

I thought Nesbø’s choice to make Hecate the head of the most successful drug cartel in the town was brilliant, and especially to have three women brewing the drugs. One of these three, Strega (Italian for witch, dontcha know) is Hecate’s main way of communicating with Macbeth and Lady, among others.

Someday, when I’m more in the mood for dark and dangerous, I may take this book on again and see what I make of it the second time around. In the meanwhile, I may check out the National Theatre’s production of the play (starring Rory Kinnear and Anne-Marie Duff) later this month at my local movie theatre.

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