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review 2018-01-21 00:39
Too Much Salt and Pepper (Living Forest #2)
Too Much Salt and Pepper: Two Porcupines with Prickly Spines Who Make You Laugh and Think - Sam Campbell

If one porcupine made for a good book then Sam Campbell thought that two would be even better.  In the second book of his Living Forest series, Too Much Salt and Pepper, Campbell describes the adventures and lessons surrounding the titular “porkies” Salt and Pepper along with wise ol’ Inky during a year at the Sanctuary of Wegimind.

 

The events of this book take place a few years after How’s Inky? as Sam and his wife Giny arrive at their animal sanctuary to discover the young porcupines Salt and Pepper eagerly awaiting them.  The two “porkies” are friendly, funny, and very mischievous especially when they want to play.  But as the year progresses, Pepper answers the call of the wild while Salt continued to want human companionship.  Most the book centers around the week-long visit of Carol, a young friend of the Campbells, who wants to experience the nature they describe in their lectures.  The experiences, stories, and lessons that Sam and Giny show Carol—along with a dose of porcupine mischievousness—as best they can in a week the lessons nature has taught them over the years.

 

With this book being twice as long as the previous Living Forest book, Sam Campbell fills it numerous stories of past adventures and misadventures while also detailing Carol’s weeklong stay during which occurs most of his famous philosophy.  Campbell uses an older Inky to be the mouthpiece of his lessons and teachings to the intended younger audience of the book, yet Inky’s “woodsy philosophy” can be very instructive to adults as well while not being preachy.

 

Though a longer read, Too Much Salt and Pepper is wonderful nature read and I highly recommend it readers of all ages.

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url 2018-01-18 09:41
Art of 4 Elements Poetry Free this weekend
Art of 4 Elements - Nataša Pantović Nuit

Art of 4 Elements Poem Spiritual Evolution by Nataša Pantović Nuit

Free to download this weekend!

Discover Alchemy through Poetry and do let us know what you think! We would love to read your thoughts and inspirations in a review...

 

https://www.amazon.com/Art-Elements-Discover-Mindfulness-Training-ebook/dp/B00TSR97N2

Source: www.amazon.com/Art-Elements-Discover-Mindfulness-Training-ebook/dp/B00TSR97N2
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url 2018-01-18 09:20
Conscious Parenting Free this weekend
Conscious Parenting: Mindful Living Course for Parents - Nataša Pantović Nuit
Conscious Parenting - Nataša Pantović Nuit

Conscious Parenting Book Quote about Kids and Truth

A child has a deep longing to discover that the World is based on Truth. Respect that longing.  In our attempt to help children grow into Inspired Adults, we wish them to carry the Youthfulness of their Souls, and the Wonders of Childhood into their old age.'

Conscious Parenting FREE to download this weekend! Explore the Mindfulness Exercises designed for the family and do let us know what you think! We would love to read your review!

 

https://www.amazon.com/Conscious-Parenting-Mindful-Mindfulness-Training-ebook/dp/B00U8V75SQ

Source: www.amazon.com/Conscious-Parenting-Mindful-Mindfulness-Training-ebook/dp/B00U8V75SQ
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review 2018-01-14 03:21
The Last Castle by Denise Kiernan
The Last Castle: The Epic Story of Love, Loss, and American Royalty in the Nation’s Largest Home - Denise Kiernan

Biltmore is an enormous Gilded Age estate in North Carolina. It was built on the orders of George Washington Vanderbilt II in the 1880s-90s as a summer retreat and became the largest private home in America. Biltmore is situated on a plot of land to match, over 10 square miles, the bulk of which is forest and now a National Park.  The house itself, astonishingly, remains in private hands. How this came to pass makes for an entertaining bit of history.

I hadn't known much about the origins of Biltmore or its role in the early environmental movement and was impressed. Kiernan veers away from the story of the house to dwell on Vanderbilt family drama, but its to be expected. Not many people just want to hear about stone korbels and inspiration for plasterwork. The Biltmore Vanderbilts lived interesting lives, Edith (George's wife) in particular with her involvement in an Arts & Crafts cottage industry around the estate. The other family members, especially where it seemed Kiernan had to fill gaps of information with speculation such as with Cornelia Vanderbilt (the original heiress), was less interesting. Thanks to this book, Biltmore and its gardens and the park surrounding it have risen above the 'cottages' of Rhode Island as a must-visit for me.

The fact that Biltmore, such a white elephant from the beginning, survived intact through a century as destructive as the last one is remarkable.

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review 2018-01-07 00:53
How's Inky? (Living Forest #1)
How's Inky? - Sam Campbell

When a little porcupine becomes the topic of conversation people want to talk to you about, you either accept it or become annoyed.  Nature writer Sam Campbell though thought the question, How’s Inky? the perfect title to title the first book of what would eventually become the Living Forest series.

 

Campbell wrote about the adventures of Inky the porcupine around his home in the animal sanctuary of Wegimind that he along with two other men supervised through spring, summer, and fall every year.  Inky was one of five orphaned baby animals that the sanctuary cared for and helped to survive before releasing them into the wild.  Although Campbell does talk about the other four animals, it’s Inky that is the one Campbell focuses on because of Inky’s view of life and what it can teach people.

 

How’s Inky? was not the first book Campbell wrote nor his first public exposure, which was a nature radio program first aired in Chicago in the 1930s.  Known as the ‘philosopher of the forest’, this book shows why Campbell was given that moniker as his lessons from nature are written in a down-to-earth style that readers of all ages will enjoy.  Campbell does speak of God as part of his lessons, but the book is does not ooze religion.

 

At a quick 127 pages, How’s Inky? is a fun read for all ages and highly recommended if you enjoy nature books and for a nice read for a rainy day.

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