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text 2018-11-20 03:21
Hardware is like the jewelry for your home

When you walk up to a home, the first thing that you notice is always the front door and its hardware. Actually, you only notice the hardware if the home has nice hardware installed; otherwise, all you notice is the door. Let's face it, most homes are built with cheap hardware, there's really not much there to notice.Hardware is like the jewelry for your home.

Just as a pretty woman can become stunning with the right jewelry accents, a nice home can look rich by installing the right sort of door hardware. Actually, other than complicated wood molding, there's nothing else in the building of a home that conveys a message of luxury like the hardware used on the doors. Even expensive homes will look cheap if the door hardware is cheap.Changing your door hardware is one of the easiest remodeling projects you can do. While most people won't comment on it, everyone will see it. Integrated entry door sets which have the door knob, deadbolt, and handle mounted together on a plate set the tone for your door hardware selection. If you go for a lever design, instead of a more traditional knob, that adds to the ;richness; of your home.It's important to maintain the same style throughout your home. Nothing says ;run down; the same as having mismatched door hardware.

People will look at it and wonder what happened. Take this the next step and make sure your cabinet hardware in the kitchen and bath match your door hardware as well. Adding hardware to your kitchen cabinets can take the mundane and make it look expensive.The right hardware can set the tone for the style of your house. Is your home colonial? Then pick an antique brass or copper hardware for your doors. Is your home ultra-modern? Then you'll want to select polished brass door hardware, possibly in a full sphere shape. Whatever you ultimately choose, it should go not only with the style of your house, but also with the decorating style you are using throughout your home.Replacing door hardware is a snap.

Most doorknobs are held in place by only six screws; two that hold the outer and inner knobs together, two that hold the door striker to the doorframe, and two that hold the deadlatch to the edge of the door. Since door hardware is standardized, you shouldn't have to drill any new holes, or change the size of any of the existing ones. One little detail of installation that you should be aware of; the doorknob which has the screw holes in it always goes on the inside of the door, with the screw holes forming a horizontal line.Most door hardware manufacturers make their products in matching series. So, you can use the same series or style of doorknobs for pass doors, privacy lock doors, and even closet doors. Be sure to save the simple key that comes with your privacy lock doors, so that you can get into your children's rooms when they decide to lock themselves in.There you have it, a simple home makeover, that like putting on that string of pearls, really dresses up the rest of your home.

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text 2018-11-07 01:56
There are a variety of portable air compressors available

An Air compressor pump is indeed indispensable in the highly industrial world where many machines come and change the way production and work is done. Almost all of these machines go through a series of evolution to attend to the changing needs of many industries.
Like most other machines and even robots, this kind of machine has its types that serve a particular kind of industry, or even hobby. The evolutions did not only make the air compressor pump dependable equipment it has become more reliable too.
Make sure that your air compressor pump is the most appropriate one for your tank. This way you can use your equipment to its fullest and to avoid accidents and injuries while working. It is important that you be able to identify which pump is the best for your nature of work, because there are many types of air compressor pumps available.
The most common is the piston compressor. This falls under the positive displacement compressors, which you can find in fractional to very high horsepower ranges. The positive displacement air compressor works by filling an air chamber with air and reducing the chamber volume.
Other types that fall under the positive displacement compressors are the following: reciprocating, rotary screw and rotary sliding vane. The positive displacement compressor such as the piston compressor works similarly with an internal combustion engine in a reverse manner. They could have cylinders, pistons, housing blocks, valves and crankshafts.
Another form is the non-positive displacement compressor. A type that falls under it is the centrifugal compressor.
Most industries prefer the industrial air compressor for their convenience. But even home owners could keep an air compressor pump around, for their needs. There are a variety of portable air compressors available.
This kind is suitable for people on the go or who travel. You never have to go through the tedious task of having to find a vehicle big enough to carry your compressor wherever you wanted to go.
Also, the portable air compressor is useful in hobbies like scuba diving. To make breathing underwater possible, an air compressor for scuba was made. This type of air compressor pump has made possible major breakthrough in the study of marine life. It has helped many adventurers explore the beauty of the sea.
You cab always rely on the air compressor pump to address your needs. High pressure air is a precious resource, especially in industries because it is safe, convenient, clean and flexible. Industries have been relying in it for over a century.
So air compressor manufacturer will find ways to create breakthroughs to be able to meet industries changing needs. But the most important thing you need to look into is safety.

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review 2018-04-05 17:13
Invictus
Invictus - Ryan Graudin

[I received a copy of this book through Netgalley.]

What I liked:

- The beginning. Of course, you can tell immediately where this is going, and that there’s going to be another proposal to offset the bad news, and you can guess what that proposal will be, but it’s OK because it’s why you’re reading the book. Well, why I was reading it, at any rate.

- Some aspects of the world building, with the idea of trained people going back in time to record events, and having to follow specific rules to avoid creating paradoxes. It makes a lot of sense, since the ‘grandfather paradox’ is definitely not the only risk in such a setting: it’s obvious that you wouldn’t want to kill your own grandfather if you hope to be born someday… but it’s much less obvious that even ‘small’ actions like gambling in a casino can have consequences, for instance by preventing the ‘normal’ winner from winning, in turn preventing them from doing things that should normally have happened, and so on. The most noticeable actions aren’t the only ones that can change the world.

- The crew’s dynamics. I have a soft spot for heist stories carried by a crew (ship, spaceship, band of misfits, whatever), and when the latter works well together, it’s even better. In itself¸ this part wasn’t the most exceptional ever, but I could feel the ties uniting them, and that was good.

- Diversity. Priya is obviously of Indian origin, Gram is dark-skinned, and Far also has inherited a darker complexion from his father. It’s not mentioned more than once or twice, but it’s good to see.

- The book was entertaining, I wanted to know how the story would go (good thing I’ve been on sick leave and with time on my hands to rush through it, huh), and in general the action and tension scenes were gripping.

What I didn’t like so much:

- The romance. I’m not particularly keen on romance in general, for starters— in my experience 90% of such subplots, when they happen in stories whose main genre is not romance, are there because it’s what people (or the market, or publishing houses, I’m never really sure) expect. As a result, the romance feels forced, and that’s the feeling I got here. I didn’t particularly care about Imogen having a crush, all the more since it led to some screen time being used up for conversations about boys and should-I-oh-no-I-don’t-dare. As for the romance between Far and Priya, it was announced very suddenly, its beginnings happened off-scene, and I never felt any real chemistry between these two. In a story revolving around an all-for-one type of crew, friendship all the way would’ve worked better for me.

- The lull mid-book, the part where they go to Las Vegas. Partly because of the romance-related conversations, partly because I wanted to shout ‘Seriously, characters, is partying and getting drunk the best you can do right now?’

- Some other aspects of the world building. Yes, I know I partially liked it. However, some elements were there for… no reason? Example: How can Priya be 17-18 and already a full-fledged medic, with mechanic skills to boot? When did she got time to learn all that? Or why do they eat synthetic food, why is ice cream so expensive? I felt the latter points were here to give a ‘science-fictiony’ sheen, but without explanations about why the world came to be like that, I can never fully buy it. (I’m not asking for a treaty about 24th century economics, but at least a couple of lines about the whys would be nice.)

- Part of the plot when it comes to Eliot’s involvement. First, it’d have been good to see a couple of successful heists before she appeared, so that the disruption she created would be even stronger. Second, the true reason for her presence is somewhat complicated, and may have worked better with a little more development. An example of what I felt rushed with that is how easily an antagonist character convinces other antagonist characters to work with him, towards the end, in order to stop her; it happened very quickly, wasn’t very convincing, and anyway, why didn’t he enlist his own after that, to add a strike force he could fully control?
(Side note: I found the names they used very confusing. I could deal with the endings, like FLT6, but the whole strings of numbers in the middle… I kept trying to imagine the conversation with Eliot speaking these numbers, and I’m surprised she didn’t make a mistake every two sentences when using those.)

- The characters, outside of their role as a group. As a crew, I thought they functioned together well; but as individuals, they felt flatter. They have their quirks, sure (Imogen dying her hair, Gram and his games), but quirks don’t make a full-fledged character. I didn’t really like Far, he had too much of the ‘strong ego/insufferable’ vibe without enough of the ‘dashing captain/charisma’ vibe, so to speak. Also, I would’ve liked to see more of Gram, for some reason I liked him best.

Conclusion: Cool concepts, with good action scenes. The book was an entertaining read, although it failed in other parts.

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review 2018-02-03 21:41
Pullman Sprinkles Some More Magic Dust!
La Belle Sauvage - Philip Pullman

When it’s been more than 20 years since the publication of an awesomely successful trilogy, there must be a temptation to just leave it alone. Notwithstanding the frenzied publicity, there’s an attendant apprehension for the (now older) fans that a savoured memory might be about to be irreparably tarnished. Of course, my bluff was called by the Christmas gift of a copy of Phillip Pullman’s prequel to the original “His Dark Materials” (my family know me so well). Though, to be fair, I did delay my gratification until January and the last remnants of festive chocolate, before gorging myself in sumptuous sessions of novel gluttony. 546 pages swept past with all the force of the flood that has beset Pullman’s parallel Oxford. And, amid the carnage, an unlikely pair of guardians for Lord Asriel’s baby daughter – Lyra Belacqua.


Still, it was reassuring to discover the author’s story-telling has not dimmed at all in the intervening years and this latest adventure unfolds at a gloriously break-neck pace. All the familiar components are present, the fascinating animal dæmons accompanying each human, like an external emotional core; the alethiometer – an instrument of almost mystical qualities, powered by ‘dust’; and the ongoing struggle between the malevolent Magisterium (church) and scientific schools of thought. Throw in a giant, a witch and a fairy and what’s not to like?!


What I do like is the seamless way Pullman has laid the foundations of the later books here and even offered some deeper explanation for why, in due course, Lyra will find herself the subject of ‘scholastic sanctuary’ at Jordan College. We haven’t learnt much more yet about the relationship between her parents, Asriel and the enigmatic Mrs Coulter, but their absence from the life of their daughter is curious, especially since the baby’s safety is instead reliant on eleven year-old Malcolm Polstead and fifteen year-old pub washer-upper, Alice. But, what great heroes they turn out to be!

 

For younger readers there’s surely a certain satisfaction in seeing these main characters outwit their elders, however, that’s not to suggest the book cannot be appreciated by an adult readership. Indeed the brutality of some scenes and the protagonist’s struggle with their part in the violence suggests that this is more than simply a tale of derring do. In any event, Pullman’s compelling storyline that pits good versus evil fizzes along and readers (young and old), can expect to be rooting for the good guys and hoping the cruel wrong’un with the three-legged hyena for a dæmon, gets his comeuppance!

 

Using Malcolm’s canoe (the ‘Belle Sauvage’), the youngsters need to navigate the flooded Thames valley and get Lyra to safety in London, traversing the natural barriers and avoiding the chasing Magisterium agents, who have other designs on the child of prophecy. For me 'His Dark Materials' set the bar very high, but I'm delighted to report that  ‘The Book of Dust’ is a magnificent romp that skilfully adds to the existing classic trilogy and has left this reader wanting more. What more could I ask for....the next two books in the new series perhaps (family take note)?

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