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Search tags: Recommended-by-Ron
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review 2017-11-14 16:31
Debut Author On About Love, Lost, Healing and Redemption At A Good Start
I Liked My Life - Abby Fabiaschi

There is a unique voice in I Liked My Life and it comes from Abby Fabiaschi. As I read it, I never thought it would be poignant for me and it does, in a sentimental way. This is a book that talks about loss, connection, healing, redemption and forgiveness in ways it was never predictable. Most books would have their characters stayed on to the very end in a formula that ends with a practical approached in writing. I find this emotionally well-written, and although I did not shed a tear (for my own personal reasons), I do find this book important and should be read.

 

I Liked My Life talks about one family in three perspectives - Madeline, whom recently died from committing suicide still lingers on in spiritual form, Eve, a distraught seventeen year-old daughter in disbelieved that her mother died suddenly and was ashamed of her death and BradyEve's father and husband to Madeline who blamed himself for Madeline's death. As I read on, what draws me in are the depth in the characters that are written. Then, I loved most of the characters that interacts so well together as real as what families are. And what makes it work is how it was handled in it. Every single chapter reveals parts of the characters that really makes you closer to them. Every single dialogue was written in how real people deal with their loss. Its a love story about family, what keeps them together, the secrets family members keep and the importance of compassion. I was trying to gauge the story but in every single chapter, I thought I could predicted it. Turns out, as realism gets, its different in some levels that life isn't what we expected but through help, what we needed is the least expectation.

 

For me, I would have given a higher rating of 5 out of 5 star, but then towards the end of the book it was anti-climatic for me. Not to mention, it was used before. In a way, it was clever to hide the true reason but after reading that chapter, I was just feeling at a bit of loss at the reasoning. I Liked My Life is a book I would recommend to a certain group of people to read because of its writing, its sheer wit and for those who wants to hug their family members more.

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review 2017-10-24 17:02
Wise Children / Angela Carter
Wise Children - Angela Carter

Dora and Nora Chance are a famous song-and-dance team of the British music halls. Billed as The Lucky Chances, the sisters are the illegitimate and unacknowledged daughters of Sir Melchoir Hazard, the greatest Shakespearean actor of his day. At once ribald and sentimental, glittery and tender, this rambunctious family saga is Angela Carter at her bewitching best.

 

Read to fill the “Magical Realism” square of my 2017 Halloween Bingo card.

The large cast of off-beat characters in this book reminded me strongly of Canadian author, Robertson Davies. And all of the links back to Melchior Hazard, Shakespearean actor, made me think of Station Eleven! But Carter definitely makes this tale all her own, despite the echoes with other authors.

Like the Shakespeare that permeates the novel, there are lots of twins, sudden changes in fortune, costumes, and a lot of uncertain parentage. As the old saw goes, it’s a wise child that knows its own father. Dora Chance, Melchior’s illegitimate daughter and twin to Nora Chance, tells the tale and it unrolls like an article in a gossip rag. Whether you can trust all she says or not is a Chance that you’ll have to take! The Lucky Chances, as the sisters are known, can only be considered lucky in comparison to others in the tale. For instance, they were raised by a woman who seemed to actually care about them, rather than by their biological parents and in this, they seem to come out ahead.

Dora and Nora sound like they would be a lot of fun to have a gin and tonic with, but I wouldn’t want to stay in their house!

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review 2017-10-10 18:58
Northanger Abbey / Jane Austen
Northanger Abbey - Jane Austen,Elizabeth Hardwick

'To look almost pretty, is an acquisition of higher delight to a girl who has been looking plain the first fifteen years of her life, than a beauty from her cradle can ever receive'

During an eventful season at Bath, young, naïve Catherine Morland experiences the joys of fashionable society for the first time. She is delighted with her new acquaintances: flirtatious Isabella, who shares Catherine's love of Gothic romance and horror, and sophisticated Henry and Eleanor Tilney, who invite her to their father's mysterious house, Northanger Abbey. There, her imagination influenced by novels of sensation and intrigue, Catherine imagines terrible crimes committed by General Tilney. With its broad comedy and irrepressible heroine, this is the most youthful and and optimistic of Jane Austen's works.

 

I chose this novel to fill the “Gothic” square of my 2017 Halloween Book Bingo.

In Northanger Abbey, Jane Austen turns the gothic novel inside out, having some fun with all of its parts. Catherine Morland, our main character, is not a stereotypical gothic heroine—she isn’t tremendously beautiful, she isn’t sophisticated or educated, and she’s not even too bright! But she does read gothic romances, like The Mysteries of Udolpho to use as a guide for her behaviour. Unfortunately for her, her frenemy Isabella turns out to be a gold-digger, her visit to Northanger Abbey produces no murders nor secret passages, and there turn out to be no impediments between her and the man of her choice. The most ungothic of gothic romances!

I do have to wonder a bit about Henry, who is obviously intelligent and amusing, if only Catherine had the wits to understand him! I’m afraid he will be singularly bored, unless she can be enlivened a bit.

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review 2017-10-08 16:01
Letters Found in Books - A Young Adult Love Story
Words in Deep Blue - Cath Crowley

When I read Words in Deep Blue, why I pick it up because of its setting, the concept and of course, the blurb. Then, there is the title. In no time, I took my time to finish reading it and I love every thing about it. Although towards the end I felt it was short for me, I almost felt the right emotions might play it out right if only it was strong at the end but it wasn't. In every thing, I thoroughly enjoy the excerpts of in-between letters within the pages as it was written through the view of two protagonist best friends. Its quite a typical character-driven about two best friends who love each other but never admit and some where along the way, some thing happens and lost and found their way back. And every thing about it is how the people they meet finally put them together and love found their way. But what really set this book that won me over are the written letters, they are the true main strong points of this book.

 

For me, this is some thing I would recommend to any true book lovers out there. Its beautiful, its poetic and its one that connects lost souls in a world that people believe in materialism rather than passion. I wish I could say more about it but pick this up if you love a book about books, lost loves that later found and what we lose will eventually be found from someone close to us with certainty and commitment.

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review 2017-10-02 15:18
A Modern Day Fable of the Bizarre and of the Weird That's Truly A Wonder
Tales of Falling and Flying - Ben Loory

Modern day fables isn't some thing that is easy to write. The thing about writing such short stories it takes a lot of imagination to turn some thing that is like a fairy tale to some thing that suits the current modern day genre. But Tales of Falling and Flying some how, found its unique voice. And with that, I am glad that I pick up this book and read it in 2 days.

 

From the first short story 'The Dodo', I was in a good way speechless that this story got me thinking. There's a reflection in this story that touches on human nature, even though the story is about a dodo bird who thinks is a dodo bird but actually is a chicken since dodo birds are dead but deep down inside, its a dodo bird. Did I get you confuse? Maybe, but if you read it (in which I won't reveal much here), the metaphor is much deeper here. This is how Ben Loory found his mark as a writer. He writes what he wants to write. He writes about sad tales, love stories, science fiction with a touch of humor and even fantasy. He writes about animals that talks and do weird things. He writes about people that do weird things. In short - these are weird stories and its not a bad thing. It is his way that I love so much about it, that brings fresh new voices in the writing genre and I doubt there is anyone out there that really knows how to write a good modern day fable stories none other than him.

 

If not for a few stories which I do find it not to my liking, I would have given this a 5 rating but with 40 short stories in this book, 4 rating is what I would give plus I would recommend anyone who likes modern day fable tales or some thing that is weird.

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