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review 2016-12-09 06:37
And Then She Was Gone, A Detective Jack Stratton Novel by Christopher Greyson
And Then She Was GONE: A riveting new suspense novel - Christopher Greyson

And Then She Was Gone, A Detective Jack Stratton Novel by Christopher Greyson is a riveting and fascinating book. I couldn't turn the pages fast enough.

 

Jack Stratton is approaching his eighteenth birthday, which he calls 'garbage day' and hates because it was just a day set by social workers. He has a strong support system with Aunt Haddie and Chandler, his foster brother. His adoptive parents are loving and give strong guidance.

 

"Jack swallowed. Not even his father could match the stern look that Aunt Haddie could pull off; she was a master at it. Her stare pinned him in place and he didn't even think about moving. He couldn't even look away, though he desperately wanted to."

 

It kept me guessing, which I like, so I gave it five stars. I will add more of the Jack Stratton books to my reading list.

 

0I received a complimentary copy from Greyson Media Associates Books and NetGalley. That did not change my opinion for this review.

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review 2013-12-10 17:49
Upload by Mark McClelland
Upload - Mark McClelland

*Spoiler clearly tagged.

4.5 stars.


You say words like “virtual” and “reality” and I get pretty excited. The truth is that we all seek escapism in some way. Some exercise, some bake, some drink, some meditate and some read. But what if you could escape into an entire virtual world? A world where you could do anything, have anything and be anything? A world of your own making. Would you have any qualms about leaving your old life behind? For those of us who have loved ones, the decision wouldn’t be so cut & dried. For the loner MC of Upload, the decision was a fairly easy one.

 

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review 2013-11-08 16:32
Moth by Daniel Arenson
Moth - Daniel Arenson

**No spoiler. Or spoilers, either.

 

Well, that was surprisingly good. I wasn't sure what to expect of Moth, but with that kickass synopsis (seriously, did you read that frikkin thing?), I had an inkling that I would like it. And I did.

 

Without taking into account the logistics or science, it's a fascinating world these people live in. Half is bathed in eternal sunlight and half is cloaked by eternal night. Yesss. I dunno why I hissed, but I really like that.. There's more to it, though. The people of each half know little of their neighbors. Both sides are shrouded in mystery for one another and myths and speculation abound. Much like in our own world, their respective ignorance breeds fear and hate.

 

We get a few POV's that are, thankfully, not in 1st person. The "main" POV, Torin, is a likable fellow with a fantastic sidekick who would have made an even better MC. Bailey is a kickass chick with a big heart. I instantly liked her. I want her to have her own storyline. I think she's capable of great things.

 

At first, I was concerned about one character in particular - Koyee - who had a very boring and immature voice. In time, her story managed to ensnare me and I came to care for her deeply. The majority of my personal angst, as evidenced by my angsty status updates, can be attributed to this character and her journey.

 

The truth is that I cared for nearly all of the characters. At one point, we're introduced to a new group and again, I didn't think I'd care much about their story, but in time, I did. You have a gift, Mr. Arenson.

 

All the characters are rich, flawed and endearing, except for those few that are rich, flawed, and infuriating. Even they are great characters, though. They certainly make you sit up and feel, be it indignation or rage. Kudos to the author for provoking so many emotions. I also wanna make note that there were no weak, feebleminded female characters. All the ladies were tough as balls and that was super-refreshing.

 

Arenson certainly pulls no punches when it comes to violence and gore, but it all fit well within the story and wasn't overdone in any way. It was perfectly suited to my tastes. I like my stories gritty and dirty and there is much grit to these interwoven stories. The oppression and injustices affected me tremendously.

 

There were only a couple of things that put me off slightly. As I mentioned, I found Koyee's POV in the beginning to be very dull. I wanted to tear my hair out. Though it did become interesting, it made it hard to get into the book at first. I know this is typical for Fantasy, but personally, I like a faster pace. The other POV's were great, but I felt like the story nearly stopped when it would switch to her. Thankfully, it was short-lived.

 

The other thing that threw me off was that same character at the end. She kept yelling out these melodramatic battle cries reminiscent of Lionheart, but cheesy instead. It really took me out of the intensity of the story. Everything had come to a head and there was Koyee, yelling out corny warrior cries. I forgave her, because the girl has heart, but I wanted to shake her.

 

Despite these couple of things, I really enjoyed Moth. For the most part, I was riveted and found myself rushing to get back to it whenever I would put it down. That doesn't happen to me often anymore, so this was definitely a treat.

 

Be forewarned, this is the first in a series and for that I'm glad. Though it didn't end on a cliffhanger, there were a lot of loose ends and I can't wait to see where Arenson takes these characters next.

 

 

 

 

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