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text 2018-09-14 14:40
BOORING
Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell - Susanna Clarke

alright, my edition has over 1000 pages. It is sooo long! For some reason, these people are amazed at how much money they have, which is pretty ridiculous. I hope the mini series from the BBC is better. The potential fell flat. 

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review 2018-08-15 19:57
The Silent Ships: "Childhood's End" by Arthur C. Clarke
Childhood's End - Arthur C. Clarke


“No one of intelligence resents the inevitable.”

In “Childhood’s End” by Arthur C. Clarke



One of my favourite long novel is `Childhoods End`, but commenting on it without revealing the ending is difficult. That is the whole point after all, but still, think the early 80`s TV mini series/series of `V` - with Jane Badler as a seriously sexy, sociopathic alien - think they really were benevolent and took humanity to generations of peace and prosperity. Well, not exactly many `generations`!

 

 

If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review.

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review 2018-08-15 17:39
The People of the Sea: "Dolphin Island" by Arthur C. Clarke
Dolphin Island - Arthur C. Clarke


“Johnny Clinton was sleeping when the hovership raced down the valley, floating along the old turnpike on its cushion of air. [..] To any boy of the twenty.first century, it was a sound of magic, telling of far-off countries and strange cargoes carried in the first ships that could travel with equal ease across land and sea.”


In “Dolphin Island” by Arthur C. Clarke



“Dolphin Island” was one of the very first proper book I read, or tried to read, in English, when I was 10 or 11, in primary school, and I loved it. My dad had given it to me, because he thought it would make a good first read for a boy who was trying to teach himself English at the time. 

 

 

If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review.

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review 2018-08-15 17:07
Swallowed by the Sea of Thirst: "A Fall of Moondust" by Arthur C. Clarke
A Fall of Moondust - Arthur C. Clarke


“He was a boy again, playing in the hot sand of a forgotten summer. He had found a tiny pit, perfectly smooth and symmetrical, and there was something lurking in its depths—something completely buried except for its waiting jaws. The boy had watched, wondering, already conscious of the fact that this was the stage for some microscopic drama. He had seen an ant, mindlessly intent upon its mission, stumble at the edge of the crater and topple down the slope.

It would have escaped easily enough—but when the first grain of sand had rolled to the bottom of the pit, the waiting ogre had reared out of its lair. With its forelegs it had hurled a fusilade of sand at the struggling insect, until the avalanche had overwhelmed it and brought it sliding into the throat of the crater.

As Selene was sliding now. No ant-lion had dug this pit on the surface of the Moon, but Pat felt as helpless now as that doomed insect he had watched so many years ago. Like it, he was struggling to reach the safety of the rim, while the moving ground swept him back into the depths where death was waiting. A swift death for the ant, a protracted one for him and his companions.”


In “A Fall of Moondust” by Arthur C. Clarke

 

 

If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review.

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review 2018-08-15 14:56
Open the Pod Bay Doors, HAL: “2001: A Space Odyssey” by Arthur C. Clarke
2001: A Space Odyssey - Arthur C. Clarke


“I can never look now at the Milky Way without wondering from which of those banked clouds of stars the emissaries are coming. If you will pardon so commonplace a simile, we have set off the fire alarm and have nothing to do but to wait.”

In "The Sentinel” by “Arthur C. Clarke"



“The time was fast approaching when Earth, like all mothers, must say farewell to her children.”

In “2001: A Space Odyssey” by Arthur C. Clarke 



"Open the pod bay doors, HAL"


In the movie “2001: A Space Odyssey” by Arthur C. Clarke, Stanley Kubrick



As a 15 year old I was about to start watching a Saturday matinee film (it may have been Thunderbird) when a future presentation advert came on. It looked like a fantastic space adventure so a week later I went to see it. I was amazed - incredible looking spaceships - computers which weren't just rows of flashing lights - shots which looked like they could have been taken on the moon and a fantastic space station. I just couldn't work out how they'd made it in the same way I couldn't work out the ending (nor could many others as I recall because there was a collective 'Ay' when Bowman turned into the Starchild). I saw it again about 2 years later - after I'd read the book - with a slight air of smugness knowing that I probably had an edge on many others. It's a great film that raised so many bars but of course at the time I was far too young to be able to 'trip' out on it unless you include sherbet dabs.

 

 

If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review.

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