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text 2018-06-01 19:50
May 2018 Round-Up

 

Here we are with my May round-up I did actually get more books done, I'm just way behind on posting them, I'm behind pretty much on everything, but I did finally post my giant book haul, if you missed it here is the link  to it.

May was a pretty busy but also a good month.I was all caught up with my review copies and then got some book mail from Bloomsbury. Thank you :) . So I have a few more plus I requested the first book in a new series by Ilona Andrews on Netgalley. Finger crossed. Speaking of Ilona Andrews, I finally read the first book in the Innkeeper Series and really enjoyed, was gonna hop to the next but decided to work on some review copies instead ;)

So that will be pretty much my goal for June, to work on the review copies and hopefully put some of the reviews up that I have sitting here. 

In any case, here are the my May books , I think most of the buy links are in the reviews that will be linked down below. 

As always happy reading and have a lovely June .


True Born by L.E. Sterling

 

 

After the great Plague descended, the world population was decimated…and their genetics damaged beyond repair. The Lasters wait hopelessly for their genes to self-destruct. The Splicers pay for expensive treatments that might prolong their life. The plague-resistant True Borns are as mysterious as they are feared… And then there’s Lucy Fox and her identical twin sister, Margot. After endless tests, no one wants to reveal what they are. When Margot disappears, a desperate Lucy has no choice but to put her faith in the True Borns, led by the charismatic Nolan Storm and the beautiful but deadly Jared Price. As Lucy and the True Borns set out to rescue her sister, they stumble upon a vast conspiracy stretching from Dominion’s street preachers to shady Russian tycoons. But why target the Fox sisters? As they say in Dominion, it’s in the blood.

 

2 ½ ★


True North by L.E. Sterling

 

It’s not you…it’s your DNA. Abandoned by her family in Plague-ridden Dominion City, eighteen-year-old Lucy Fox has no choice but to rely upon the kindness of the True Borns, a renegade group of genetically enhanced humans, to save her twin sister, Margot. But Nolan Storm, their mysterious leader, has his own agenda. When Storm backtracks on his promise to rescue Margot, Lucy takes her fate into her own hands and sets off for Russia with her True Born bodyguard and maybe-something-more, the lethal yet beautiful Jared Price. In Russia, there’s been whispered rumors of Plague Cure. While Lucy fights her magnetic attraction to Jared, anxious that his loyalty to Storm will hurt her chances of finding her sister, they quickly discover that not all is as it appears…and discovering the secrets contained in the Fox sisters’ blood before they wind up dead is just the beginning. As they say in Dominion, sometimes it’s not you…it’s your DNA.

 

1 ½ ★


 A Court of Frost and Starlight by Sarah J. Maas

 

 

Feyre, Rhys, and their close-knit circle of friends are still busy rebuilding the Night Court and the vastly-changed world beyond. But Winter Solstice is finally near, and with it, a hard-earned reprieve.

Yet even the festive atmosphere can’t keep the shadows of the past from looming. As Feyre navigates her first Winter Solstice as High Lady, she finds that those dearest to her have more wounds than she anticipated–scars that will have far-reaching impact on the future of their Court

   

3★


Lifelike by Jay Kristoff

 

On a floating junkyard beneath a radiation sky, a deadly secret lies buried in the scrap. Eve isn’t looking for secrets—she’s too busy looking over her shoulder. The robot gladiator she’s just spent six months building has been reduced to a smoking wreck, and the only thing keeping her Grandpa from the grave was the fistful of credits she just lost to the bookies. To top it off, she’s discovered she can destroy electronics with the power of her mind, and the puritanical Brotherhood are building a coffin her size. If she’s ever had a worse day, Eve can’t remember it. But when Eve discovers the ruins of an android boy named Ezekiel in the scrap pile she calls home, her entire world comes crashing down. With her best friend Lemon Fresh and her robotic conscience, Cricket, in tow, she and Ezekiel will trek across deserts of irradiated glass, infiltrate towering megacities and scour the graveyard of humanity’s greatest folly to save the ones Eve loves, and learn the dark secrets of her past. Even if those secrets were better off staying buried.

5★


Children of Blood and Bone by Tomi Adeyemi

 

Zélie Adebola remembers when the soil of Orïsha hummed with magic. Burners ignited flames, Tiders beckoned waves, and Zelie’s Reaper mother summoned forth souls.

But everything changed the night magic disappeared. Under the orders of a ruthless king, maji were targeted and killed, leaving Zélie without a mother and her people without hope.

Now, Zélie has one chance to bring back magic and strike against the monarchy. With the help of a rogue princess, Zélie must outwit and outrun the crown prince, who is hell-bent on eradicating magic for good.

Danger lurks in Orïsha, where snow leoponaires prowl and vengeful spirits wait in the waters. Yet the greatest danger may be Zélie herself as she struggles to control her powers—and her growing feelings for the enemy.

 

5 ★

 


Source: snoopydoosbookreviews.com/index.php/2018/06/01/may-2018-round-up
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review 2018-05-20 00:00
One More Round
One More Round - Lauren Helms Level Me Up may have been Dex and Morgan's journey into relationship bliss, but it was the undercurrents that Gia and Si set off that had me wondering. One More Round delves into the history of Simon and Gia. The friendship, heartache and secrets help to unite them, yet ultimately proved the catalyst that drove them apart. Helms has a talent for keeping readers guessing even as she leaves them craving more. Another example of prime reading.
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text 2018-05-01 13:00
Round-Up for March and April 2018

 

I cannot believe we are actually going into May already, the time is just flying by. 

Sadly I was super busy, sick  or had some dental work done and really didn't get a lot books read in the last couple months,hence the double round-up this month. But some book I actually just combined or a all in one addition came out for review. So the actually books read or reviewed I shoulds say is not as much. I have  few more but I still have to write up some reviews so it will have to wait.

 

I'm actually thinking about putting up a new blog since while it is also refreshing to to have one, I also miss it. But if I do I will not put so much stress on myself and just post whatever and whenever , just for fun. 

But we shall see lol.

 

I should however post a book haul it has been forever and it its getting out of control but I think I wait toll after may since there are a few books coming out yet that I really want to get and add .

 

I hope everyone is having a great time and enjoying the nice weather and everyone is reading some great books. 

 

Here are my books for March/April 2018

To get to the reviews of the books, just click the covers ;)  

 

*********

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Norse Chronicles by Karissa Laurel

 

The Norse Chronicles - Karissa Laurel

 

 

4 ½-5 ★


Vision in Silver by Anne Bishop

 

Vision in Silver - Anne Bishop

 

4 ★


Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell

 

Fangirl by Rowell, Rainbow (2014) Paperback - Rainbow Rowell

 

4 ★


Shocking the Medic by Elizabeth Otto 

 

Shocking the Medic - Elizabeth Otto

 

1/2★


Gemina by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff

 

Gemina (The Illuminae Files) - Jay Kristoff, Amie Kaufman

 

5★


Unraveled by Kate Jarvik Birch

 

Unraveled (Perfected) - Kate Jarvik Birch

 

4 ½ ★


Forget You by Nina Crespo

 

Forget You (The Kingman Brothers #1) - Nina Crespo

 

1 ½ ★


Pestilence by Laura Thalassa

 

Pestilence - Laura Thalassa

 

2 ½ -3★


Thunderhead by Neal Shusterman

 

Thunderhead (Arc of a Scythe) - Neal Shusterman

 

5★


The Sea of Monsters by Rick Riordan

 

The Sea of Monsters - Rick Riordan

 

5 ★


 

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text 2018-04-10 08:02
Responsibilities of Professional Building Contractors near Me

A professional building contractor is a man who is generally in charge of the correct development of a building whether it is a habitation building or a building worked for business purposes. In this manner, they accept bunches of obligations and in addition duties. Their principle obligation is to have a review of the considerable number of procedures and endeavours made for the development of appropriate structure of the building. There are loads of different obligations too.

 

An Professional building contractor by and large is a man who takes part in everything identified with the advancement of a building like arranging, planning, keeping up quality work, taking well being measures and keeping due date. A Professional contractor might be the person who has the ability to administer the building and ensure that all the vital plans are made for the finishing of the development of the building.

 

There are a few obligations and duties which Professional building contractors near me should finish frequently to ensure that the general development of the undertaking is completed inside the due date keeping up every one of the necessities of the clients. The most importantly obligation of any building contractor is more often than not to execute a thought with the goal that the general development task can be done to flawlessness. This reaches out between procuring skilful specialists to having a rule for a particular venture that will be entirely taken after from the earliest starting point to the end.

 

In spite of the way that not all Professional the building contractors near me are the same and not every one of them utilise or take after similar procedures, there are a few likenesses between them. They have everything required for the correct development of a building alongside administration characteristics and in addition the mindset to finish an undertaking inside a due date to keep up high calibre of works.

 

There are some unmistakable contrasts between building contractors and general contractors. General contractors round rock tx are individuals who as a rule work for a particular organisation to the detriment of a compensation on a particular contract or month to month premise. General contractors are in charge of the plan and legitimate execution of work that is finished. They are likewise in charge of the supply of materials alongside work and vital supplies for the development of the building. To be brief, general contractors are the ones vigorously engaged with the making of a building yet not as far as system or assignment with their customers. They simply need to keep up what they are advised to do by the concerned specialist of a building development organisation.

 

To finish up, proficient building contractors assume an incredible part in the development of a building. Any potential customers need to discover a building contractor with the required aptitude they require and a notoriety of looking after due date. The obligation of the building contractor is to care for whatever remains of the task.

 

Dominion Group LLC is the leading commercial general contractor in Austin. We provide General Contracting and Commercial construction services in Austin, Round Rock, Dallas, San Antonio, Houston, and surrounding communities.  

 

For more info call now 512-363-6753 

 

or 

 

Visit our site http://dominiongroupllc.com

 

Source: http://bit.ly/2IEzrv8

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review 2018-04-02 21:17
My KYD Reads ... or: Harry Potter, and What Else I read in March 2018
Harry Potter Box Set: The Complete Collection - J.K. Rowling
Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone. Gryffindor Edition - ROWLING J.K.
Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows - J.K. Rowling,Stephen Fry
The Hog's Back Mystery - Freeman Wills Crofts,Gordon Griffin
The Red Queen - Margaret Drabble
A Red Death: An Easy Rawlins Mystery - Walter Mosley,Michael Boatman
Imperium - Robert Harris
The Distant Echo - Val McDermid,Tom Cotcher
Unterleuten: Roman - Juli Zeh
"A Brief Discourse of Rebellion and Rebels" by George North: A Newly Uncovered Manuscript Source for Shakespeare's Plays - Dennis McCarthy,June Schlueter

A big thank you to Moonlight Reader for yet another fun, inventive BookLikes game!  I had a wonderful time, while also advancing -- though with decidedly fewer new reads than I'd origianlly been planning -- my two main reading goals for this year (classic crime fiction and books written by women).

 

Harry Potter - The Complete Series

This was a long-overdue revisit and obviously, there isn't anything I could possibly say about the books that hasn't been said a million times before by others.  But I've gladly let the magic of Hogwarts and Harry's world capture me all over again ... to the point of giving in to book fandom far enough to treat myself to the gorgeous hardcover book set released in 2014 and, in addition, the even more gorgeous Gryffindor and Ravenclaw anniversary editions of Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone.

 

 

That said, particular kudos must also go to Stephen Fry for his magnificent audio narration of the books, which played a huge role in pulling me right back into to books, to the point that I'd carry my phone wherever I went while I was listening to them.

 

Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone - J.K. Rowling, Stephen Fry Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets - J.K. Rowling, Stephen Fry Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban - J.K. Rowling, Stephen Fry Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire - J.K. Rowling, Stephen FryHarry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix - J.K. Rowling, Stephen Fry Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince - J.K. Rowling, Stephen Fry Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows - J.K. Rowling, Stephen Fry

 

 

As for the rest of my KYD books ... roughly in the order in which I read them:

 

Ngaio Marsh: Death at the Dolphin (aka Killer Dolphin)

Killer Dolphin - Ngaio Marsh Death at the Dolphin - Ngaio Marsh

Also a revisit: One of my favorite installments in Marsh's Roderick Alleyn series, not only because it is set in the world of the theatre -- always one of Marsh's particular fortes, as she herself was a veteran Shakespearean director and considered that her primary occupation, while writing mysteries to her was merely a sideline -- but because this one, in fact, does deal with a(n alleged) Shakespearean relic and a play based on Shakespeare's life, inspired by that relic.

 

 

The Hog's Back Mystery - Freeman Wills Crofts, Gordon Griffin

Freeman Wills Crofts:
The Hog's Back Mystery

 Part of Crofts's Inspector French series and my first book by Crofts, who was known for his painstaking attempts to "play fair" with the reader; which here, I'm afraid, hampered the development of the story a bit, in producing a fair bit of dialogue at the beginning that might have been better summed up from the third person narrator's point of view in the interest of easing along the flow of the story, and in holding French back even at points where a reasonably alert reader would have developed suspicions calling for a particular turn of the investigation.  But I like French as a character, and as for all I'm hearing this is very likely not the series's strongest installment, I'll happily give another book a try later.

 

 

Unnatural Death: A Lord Peter Wimsey Mystery - Dorothy L. Sayers, Ian Carmichael

Dorothy L. Sayers: Unnatural Death

Not my favorite Lord Peter Wimsey book by Sayers, but virtually the only one I haven't revisited on audio recently -- and as always, I greatly enjoyed the narration by Ian Carmichael.  That said, here again Sayers proves herself head and shoulders above her contemporaries, in devising a particularly fiendish, virtually untraceable method of murder (well, untraceable by the medical state of the art of her day at least), and perhaps even more so by hinting fairly obviously at two women's living together in what would seem to be a lesbian relationship.

 

 

The Red Queen - Margaret Drabble

Margaret Drabble: The Red Queen

Ummm ... decidedly NOT my favorite read of the month.  'Nuff said: next!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Red Death: An Easy Rawlins Mystery - Walter Mosley, Michael Boatman

Walter Mosley: A Red Death

I'd long been wanting to return to the world of Easy Rawlins' mid-20th century Los Angeles, so what with Mosley's fiction making for various entries in the KYD cards, including at least one book by him in my reading plans for the game seemed only fitting (... even if I ended up using this one for a "Dr. Watson" victim guess!). -- This, the second installment of the series, deals with the political hysteria brought about by the McCarthy probes and also makes a number of pertinent points on racial discrimination and xenophobia, which make it decidedly uncomfortable reading in today's political climate.

 

 

One, Two, Buckle My Shoe - Hugh Fraser, Agatha Christie

Agatha Christie: One, Two, Buckle My Shoe

Another revisit, and in no small part courtesy of Hugh Fraser's narration, I liked the book a good deal better than I had done originally.  This is one of several entries in the Poirot canon where we learn about Poirot's phobia of dentist's visits, which obviously makes for the high point of the book's humour ... and of course it doesn't exactly help that it's Poirot's dentist, of all people, who turns out the murder victim. -- The plot features several clever slights of hand, and you have to play a really long shot to get the solution right in its entirety (even if strictly speaking Christie does play fair).  Well, that's what we have Monsieur Poirot's little grey cells for, I suppose!

 

 

Imperium - Robert Harris

Robert Harris: Imperium

The first part of Harris's Cicero trilogy, and both a truly fast-paced and a well-researched piece of historical writing; covering Cicero's ascent from young Senator to Praetorian and, eventually (and against all the odds), Consul. 

 

The first part of the book deals at length with one of Cicero's most famous legal cases, the prosecution of the corrupt Sicilian governor Verres, and Harris shows how Cicero employed that case in order to advance his own political career.  Notably, Cicero quite ingeniously also ignored established Roman trial practice in favor of what would very much resemble modern common law practice, by making a (by the standards of the day) comparatively short opening statement -- albeit a supremely argumentative one -- and immediately thereafter examining his witnesses, instead of, as procedural custom would have dictated, engaging in a lengthy battle of speeches with defending counsel first.  As a result of this manoeuver, Verres was as good as convicted and fled from Rome in the space of the 9 days allotted to Cicero as prosecuting counsel to make his case. 

 

The second part of the book examines Cicero's unlikely but eventually victorious campaign for consulship, and his exposure of a conspiracy involving Catiline, generally believed to be the most likely victor of that year's consular elections, who later came to be involved of conspiracies on an even greater scale, and whose condemnation in Cicero's most famous speeches -- collectively known as In Catilinam (On, or Against Catiline) -- would go a great way towards securing both Cicero's political success in his own lifetime and his lasting fame as a skilled orator.

 

 

Murder is Easy - Agatha Christie

Agatha Christie: Murder Is Easy

Another Christie revisit, and I regret to say for the most part I'm down to my less favorite books now.  This isn't a bad book, and the ending in particular is quite dark ... but the middle part, much as I'm sorry to have to say this, simply drags.

 

 

 

 

The Distant Echo - Val McDermid, Tom Cotcher

Val McDermid: The Distant Echo

Holy moly, how did I ever miss this book until now?!  Even more so since the Karen Pirie series is actually my favorite series by Val McDermid ... OK, Pirie herself has little more than a walk-on role here; we're talking absolute beginning of her career, and the focus is decidedly not on her but on her boss and  on a quartet of suspects involved in a 25-year-old murder case -- in fact, the whole first half of the book is set 25 years in the past, too, describing the immediate aftermath of the murder and its consequences for the four main suspects, chiefly from their perspective.  But still!  Well, I sure am glad I finally caught up with it at last ... definitely one of the best things McDermid ever wrote.

 

 

Unterleuten: Roman - Juli Zeh

Juli Zeh: Unterleuten

A scathing satire on village life, on post-Berlin Wall German society, on greed, on the commercialization of ideals ... and most of all, on people's inability to communicate: Everyone in this book essentially lives inside their own head, and in a world created only from the bits they themselves want to see -- with predictably disastrous consequences.  The whole thing is brilliantly observed and deftly written; yet, the lack of characters that I found I could like or empathize with began to grate after a while ... in a shorter book I might not have minded quite so much, but in a 600+ page brick I'd have needed a few more characters who actually spoke to me to get all the way through and still be raving with enthusiasm.  If you don't mind watching a bunch of thoroughly dislikeable people self-destruct in slow motion, though, you're bound to have a lot of fun with this book.

 

 

Von Köln zum Meer: Schifffahrt auf dem Niederrhein - Werner Böcking

Werner Böcking: Von Köln zum Meer

Local history, a read inspired by conversations with a visiting friend on the history of shipping and travel by boat on the Rhine. -- A richly illustrated book focusing chiefly on the 19th and 20th centuries, and the mid-19th-centuriy changes brought about by diesel engines and the resulting disappearance of sailing vessels (which, before the advent of engines, were pulled by horses when going up the river, against the current): undoubtedly the biggest change not only in land but also in river travel and transportation, with a profound effect on large sectors of the economy of the adjoining regions and communities.

 

 

And last but not least ...

 

 

Dennis McCarthy & June Schlueter: "A Brief Discourse of Rebellion and Rebels" by George North -- A Newly Uncovered Manuscript Source for Shakespeare's Plays

The lastest in Shakespearean research, also a read inspired by conversations with the above-mentioned visiting friend, and a February 7, 2018 New York Times article on a possible new source text for passages contained in no less than 11 of Shakespeare's plays.  The story of the discovery itself is fascinating; the research methods applied are in synch with modern Shakesperean scholarship ... and yet, for all the astonishing textual concordance, unless and until someone proves that Shakespeare not only had the opportunity to see this document but actually did (at least: overwhelmingly likely) see it, I'm not going to cry "hooray" just yet.  According to the authors' own timeline, Shakespeare would have been about 11 years old when this text was written, it was kept in a private collection even then, and there is no record that the Bard ever visited the manor housing that very collection -- which collection in turn, if the authors are to be believed, the text very likely at least did not ever leave during Shakespeare's lifetime (though it was undoubtedly moved at a later point in time).  And Shakespearean research, as we all know, has been prone to a boatload of dead-end streets and conspiracy theories pretty much ever since its inception ...

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