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review 2018-01-16 17:54
Review of The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman
The Yellow Wallpaper - Charlotte Perkins Gilman,Elaine Hedges

This was a short story told from the point of view of a woman who was suffering what we would today call postpartum depression.  Her husband and family force her to stay on bed rest in a strange room where she slowly loses her mind based on her surroundings - especially the wallpaper in the room.  While short, the story does a nice job making the reader feel for the main character, and gives us a glimpse of what it might be like to suffer from that type of depression.

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review 2018-01-01 21:50
The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman
The Yellow Wallpaper - Charlotte Perkins Gilman,Elaine Hedges

"The Yellow Wallpaper" is one of the few things I read during my vacation that wasn't a graphic novel or manga. I downloaded it via Project Gutenberg. I think I saw a review of it on Booklikes, but I couldn't remember a thing about it. I wasn't even sure what genre it was and, since I didn't bother to look it up before getting started, I thought it might be a mystery. It's actually more psychological fiction (psychological horror?).

An unnamed woman stays at a fancy house with her physician husband and their baby. She's supposedly there for her health. Her husband says there's nothing physically wrong with her - she's suffering from hysteria/a nervous condition and must receive as little mental stimulation as possible. The woman feels she'd be better off elsewhere, but her husband insists that she stay in the horrid former nursery with torn yellow wallpaper and barred windows. The story takes the form of secret journal entries written by this woman,

as, from lack of anything else to do, she obsesses over the wallpaper and gradually goes mad. She begins to see creeping women everywhere, including behind the paper, and finally comes to believe that she is one of the creeping women as well.

(spoiler show)


I wasn't expecting this to be so unsettling. When I first started reading, I wondered whether the woman's husband had malicious intentions. The room was objectively awful, and the woman's request to spend a bit of time elsewhere didn't seem like a big deal. I think the husband probably did have good intentions, though. He just had terrible ideas about what might help his wife. I wonder if it finally dawned on him, too late, that he'd gone about everything all wrong?

I wondered whether the room was really an old nursery, or if it had once held someone else very much like the narrator. It was such a sinister place.

All in all, this was an excellent and quick read, and this is coming from someone who generally prefers novels over short stories.

 

(Original review posted on A Library Girl's Familiar Diversions.)

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text 2017-07-03 10:37
3rd July 2017
The Yellow Wallpaper - Charlotte Perkins Gilman,Elaine Hedges

It is the same woman, I know, for she is always creeping, and most women do not creep by daylight. 

 

Charlotte Perkins Gilman

 

Charlotte Perkins Gilman (born July 3, 1860) is best known for her short story, The Yellow Wallpaper, in which the narrator's journal entries document her psychotic break.

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review 2016-12-10 00:00
The Yellow Wallpaper
The Yellow Wallpaper - Charlotte Perkins Gilman 1892? Really? Damn, this was good. This is how short stories are suppose to be done. Creepy. Building dread. Subtle terror and growing madness. Excellent!
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review 2016-10-10 17:06
The Yellow Wall-Paper
The Yellow Wallpaper - Charlotte Perkins Gilman,Elaine Hedges

From the first page (and I think this gives a good idea of the story's direction):
"If a physician of high standing, and one's own husband, assures friends and relatives that there is really nothing the matter with one but temporary nervous depression,—a slight hysterical tendency,—what is one to do?"
Written in first person, this chronicled a wife's forced seclusion by her (physician) husband. John didn't want her to write, go outside, or do *anything.* This chronicles her mental deterioration.
Throughout history, and sadly even today, women have lacked autonomy- over their lives, bodies, etc. This story is an excellent example of that. I don't see how I could give this any less than a 5.
We continue to see this today with the fight women's healthcare.

This is for the locked room mystery square.

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