logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: United-States
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-07-18 18:44
Good, if somewhat dated, overview of America's war in the Pacific and Asia
Eagle Against The Sun: The American War With Japan - Ronald H. Spector

In the 1960s Macmillan began publishing a series entitled "The Macmillan Wars of the United States." Written by some of the nation's leading military historians, its volumes offered surveys of the various conflicts America had fought over the centuries, the strategies employed, and the services which fought them. Ultimately fourteen volumes were published over two decades, with many of them still serving as excellent accounts of their respective subjects.

 

As the last book published in the series, Ronald Spector's contribution to it serves as a sort of capstone to its incomplete efforts. In it he provides an account of the battles and campaigns waged by the United States against Japan in the Second World War, from the prewar planning and the assumptions held in the approach to war to the deployment of the atomic bombs that ended it. In between the covers all of the major naval battles and island-hopping campaigns in the Pacific, as well as America's military efforts in the China-Burma-India theater. He rounds out his coverage with chapters discussing both the social composition of the forces America deployed and the complex intelligence operations against the Japanese, ones that extended beyond the now-famous codebreaking efforts that proved so valuable.

 

Though dated in a few respects, overall Spector's book serves as a solid single-volume survey of the war waged by the United States against Japan. By covering the efforts against the Japanese in mainland Asia, he incorporates an important aspect of the war too often overlooked or glossed over in histories of America's military effort against the Japanese, one that often influenced developments elsewhere in the theater. Anyone seeking an introduction to America's war with Japan would be hard pressed to find a better book, which stands as a great example of what Macmillan set out to accomplish when they first embarked upon the series.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-07-06 21:50
Friday Reads - July 6, 2018
Lafayette in the Somewhat United States - Sarah Vowell
Lethal Warriors: When the New Band of Brothers Came Home - David Philipps
Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption - Bryan Stevenson
Eye on the Struggle: Ethel Payne, the First Lady of the Black Press - James McGrath Morris
The True American: Murder and Mercy in Texas - Anand Giridharadas

This week I read Lafayette and the Somewhat United States by Sarah Vowell and Lethal Warriors by David Philipps. I am still working my way through Just Mercy by Bryan Stevenson, which I hope to finish by the end of next week. I am adding Eye on the Struggle by James McGrath Morris (biography of Ethel Payne) and The True American by Anand Giridharadas (true crime).

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-07-01 10:00
July 2018 TBR
No One Would Listen: A True Financial Thriller - Harry Markopolos
Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption - Bryan Stevenson
Lafayette in the Somewhat United States - Sarah Vowell
Negroland: A Memoir - Margo Jefferson
The True American: Murder and Mercy in Texas - Anand Giridharadas
Lethal Warriors: When the New Band of Brothers Came Home - David Philipps
Zodiac Unmasked: The Identity of America's Most Elusive Serial Killers Revealed - Robert Graysmith
Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI - David Grann
Believe Me: A Memoir of Love, Death, and Jazz Chickens - Eddie Izzard
Eye on the Struggle: Ethel Payne, the First Lady of the Black Press - James McGrath Morris

I am just binging on non-fiction, as it grabbing me so much more than fiction. I went a little OTT at the library and pulled a bunch of books. I have two read-a-thons I am doing towards the latter half of the month.

 

 

1. No One Would Listen: A True Financial Thriller by Harry Markopolos

         My current read is how Markopolos discovered the Bernie Madoff Ponzi scheme and was the whistleblower that brought Madoff down. He is not kind AT ALL to the SEC. 

 

2. Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson

           I want to learn more about criminal justice reform, so I am starting here.

 

3. Lafayette in the Somewhat United States by Sarah Vowell

              For the July 4th holiday, I am trying Vowell for the first time.

 

4. Negroland: A Memoir by Margo Jefferson

               Heard nothing but good things about this book.

 

5. The True American: Murder and Mercy in Texas by Anand Giridharadas

              True Crime that doesn't involve Wall Street.

 

6. Lethal Warriors: When the New Band of Brothers Came Home, Uncovering the Tragic Reality of PTSD by David Philipps

                This is a really long title.

 

7. Zodiac Unmasked: The Identity of America's Most Elusive Serial Killer Revealed by Robert Graysmith

                 True Crime.

 

8. Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI by David Grann

                      True Crime plus history.

 

9. Believe Me: A Memoir of Love, Death, and Jazz Chickens by Eddie Izzard

                      Not a true crime book, lol. Manicure on the cover is beautifully done.

 

10. Eye on the Struggle: Ethel Payne, the First Lady of the Black Press by James McGrath Morris

                    Also not a true crime book. I wish she was more of a household name today as she was when she was working. 

 

 

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-06-29 19:32
Friday Reads - June 29, 2018
No One Would Listen: A True Financial Thriller - Harry Markopolos
Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption - Bryan Stevenson
Lafayette in the Somewhat United States - Sarah Vowell
Conspiracy of Fools: A True Story - Kurt Eichenwald

I finished Conspiracy of Fools (the story of the rise and collapse of Enron) this morning, went bowling and lunch with the kids, then came home and started No One Would Listen (written by the whistleblower of the Bernie Madoff Ponzi scheme). So No One is my focus to knock out this weekend. After that, I want to get to Just Mercy and for the holiday, Lafayette in the Somewhat United States

 

I am getting backed up on reviewing, which is bad for me because it is COYER time and part of COYER is reviewing. So this weekend I will be here writing reviews  - sorry in advance for the review wave coming. Also writing my personal essay and resume for grad school this weekend, as that is all that is left on my end for the application process. I will probably write while watching season two of 30 Rock, my show of the summer to binge this year. 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-06-13 22:20
Laughing Without an Accent by Firoozeh Dumas
Laughing Without an Accent: Adventures of an Iranian American, at Home and Abroad - Firoozeh Dumas

I enjoyed this book – it’s an entertaining memoir-in-essays by an Iranian-American author about her life, family, and navigating two cultures. Her book titles may be doing her a disservice by treating humor as her primary selling point; I would call this book amusing, humorous, and enjoyable but not laugh-out-loud funny. Of course humor is individual, and the stories are good enough to enjoy even if you don't find them hilarious.

There are a lot of good stories here. I enjoyed reading about the author’s childhood in Iran and the U.S., appreciated that she shared her disappointing and isolated first year in college (there is a lot of pressure on kids for this to be the best time of their life, but isn’t for everyone), chuckled at the misunderstandings when she began dating her husband, experienced schadenfreude reading about her worst day as a stay-at-home mom but admired her getting the TV out of the house, and was entertained by the ups and downs of life with her quirky relatives. Toward the end there were a couple of chapters that didn’t do much for me: one about her experience of giving a graduation speech essentially regurgitates the speech (complete with long paragraphs on why we should care for our teeth and read books), while another – a potentially great chapter about her meeting Kathryn Koon, who was held hostage in Iran in 1979 – fell flat, because neither the author nor Koon seems to have many feelings about this and so it becomes a chronicle of their road trip around Iowa and what visiting an Amish store is like. Also, the "gross foods in France" chapter is indeed gross.

Overall though, this is fun reading, easy to pick up for a chapter at a time when you’re busy. Nothing huge happens in it, but it’s an enjoyable window into the author’s life as an immigrant, mixing serious topics with humor.

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?