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review 2017-10-29 21:38
The Rise of Io by Wesley Chu
The Rise of Io - Wesley Chu

Ella Patel is a con artist, a thief and a young woman who survived and even thrived on the streets of Cratetown, a vast slum that has grown up on the edge of the demilitarised zone in the aftermath of the great Alien War. And one day she found herself witness to a brutal murder, driven to intervene she never imagined she was stepping in the middle of the conflict between the Genjix and the Prophus



Or becoming the new host of the Quasing, Io. A quasing who throughout all of human history has been renowned for… her string of utter failures. This doesn’t make her the best or most useful guide for Ella now pulled into the war between the two big alien factions. A quasing can be a powerful guide - but when that quasing is Io?


In the story of Tao, we saw one of the most powerful and influential Quasing in the history of the Prophus. He has inhabited a series of powerful people who have completely and utterly shaped the world, who have achieved great things, influenced history and been at the forefront of their war against the Genjix. We’ve seen him take some extremely unprepared hosts, like Roan Tan and raise him to greatness, we’ve seen him inhabit Cameron to great effect.


Tao was a superstar, even in the most inept of hosts, Tao was a force to be reckoned with. Tao was terrifying. Tao was powerful. Tao changed the world.


Io is not a superstar. Io is an abject failure. Late to living in a human host, having great difficulty in influencing her hosts and having a long history of leaving them dead in her wake. Io is the excellent depiction of an entirely different kind of Quasing. Not all quasings are skilled world leaders, not all quasings shaped the world, not all quasings made a huge difference to world history - good and bad. And while Tao ended his arc wondering whether Quasings where good or bad for Earth and openly admitting that the Quasings are a dangerous invasive force: Io has pretty much given up on influencing the world at all. Tao is deeply invested in his host, Tao is invested in humans, Tao cares. Io is almost completely done with humanity


Through Io’s eyes we also get some really excellent insights into Quasing society when they were originally on their home planet, how their society worked, how these extremely alien creatures co-existed through the universe and how their hierarchy was structured. And from we see just how different modern Quasing are - they’re so disconnected compared to what they were and their hierarchy has been utterly turned on their head.



What is an equally awesome facet of this book is Ella, Io’s human host. And while we’ve seen Roan and Cameron very much in the thrall of Tao, following in his wake, following his lead and pretty much obeying everything Tao says. Ella is not obedient. She’s not following Io’s lead, she argues constantly, she is determined to live her own life, determined to be paid and refuses to be fobbed off, dismissed or controlled by her Quasing inhabitant. Ella is a homeless young woman living a desperate life in one of the biggest slums in the world - but she is a master of her environment, she is a power in her own right, an expert, fiercely intelligent, brave, resourceful (and all without any dubiousness. No this child of the street isn’t super educated or an amazing fighter, for example) - and if her quasing  is disappointing, she goes above and beyond any possible expectation. It’s a glorious change from Tao and shows how humanity can shine - as well as introducing the excellent conflict between Io and Ella

 

 

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Source: www.fangsforthefantasy.com/2017/10/the-rise-of-io-by-wesley-chu.html
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review 2017-10-24 19:34
Wesley the Owl
Wesley the Owl - Stacey O'Brien

Charming. A quarter into the book, it starts picking up for me.

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review 2017-10-23 20:38
The Authorized: Roy Orbison by Roy Jr., Wesley & Alex Orbison
The Authorized Roy Orbison - Alex Orbiso... The Authorized Roy Orbison - Alex Orbison,Roy Orbison,Wesley Orbison,Jeff Slate

What an incredible story!
Truth be told, I knew of Roy Orbison, the musician. Now I feel like I really know him though. Wow, what an amazing and tumultuous life he had. Rising to the top one minute only to be brought down by the worst of circumstances, over and over again.
His sons, who wrote the book, really take you inside their lives with their dad and show you the real story of his life. You gain so much insight as to why or how things were the way they were.
The photos were nice to see too, some I had seen, but most were new to me. I saw so many celebrities and family, all who Roy loved closely and cherished, but was sad to not see one photo of him and Elvis. A man he admired so much and was friends with as well.
Still, this is an excellent read. And with Tom Petty's passing as I write this out, it almost feels poetic that I finished this book today.

 

 

Source: www.fredasvoice.com/2017/10/the-authorized-roy-orbison-by-roy-jr.html
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review 2017-10-11 15:46
Fairy Retelling Based From A TV Mini Series
The 10th Kingdom - Kristine Kathryn Rusch,Kathryn Wesley
The 10th Kingdom is book that is tied to a tv movie that aired in the USA in 2000, under the same name.  It is retelling of some fairy tales and what happens after ever after.  Probably one of stories that started landslide of retelling of fairy tale movies and books.

 

I had seen the movie that this book is based on.  I love it.  I thought the book was going add on to the story or continuation of it.  It did not, it is basically a rewrite of the movie but done really well.  Since it has been 17 years (Wow!) since the movie aired I pretty much forgot a lot of the movie, so it was like a new story.  Still enjoyed it. I also loved that there were pictures of characters in the movie which made it easier to picture the actor as the characters. Love the characters Virginia and Wolf. At first I did not like them as a couple but they grow on you.  

 

I still feel there should be more after the story and wish it was a series.  I liked the stories behind the 10th Kingdoms but I do not think we will get more. It’s not the best retelling of fairy tale but it is fun and worthwhile to read or watch if you rather.

 

I really wish NBC would do more movies like this that they did in the early 2000’s.  They were bright, colorful and fanciful. Just my kind of fantasy telling.
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review 2017-10-07 18:11
Skewed by a flawed premise
De Gaulle: Lessons in Leadership from the Defiant General - Michael E. Haskew,Wesley K. Clark

Michael Haskew's book is less an analysis of Charles de Gaulle's leadership style than it is a compact overview of the French leader's life with a concentration on his military career. In it, Haskew details de Gaulle's service in the French army, his experience in both world wars, and his relationship with other key contemporaries, most notably Philippe Pétain. Haskew writes well, and peppers his text with insightful anecdotes that are both engaging and illustrative of his subject. Yet perhaps because of its place in a series on "great generals" the book is based on a flawed premise: though de Gaulle spent over three decades in uniform, he was a general in direct command of French army units for only a few weeks before he transitioned to the more political role of leader of the Free French. This Haskew does cover as well, but then he glosses over the postwar era in which de Gaulle created a political movement and served as president of France for a decade. To glance over de Gaulle's more significant role as a politician in a book ostensibly dealing with his leadership is inexcusable, and limits the value of Haskew's book as a study of his fascinating subject. Readers seeking an introduction to de Gaulle's life and career would be far better served by reading Julian Jackson's de Gaulle, which in terms of coverage and analysis is everything Haskew's book is not.

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