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review 2017-04-28 18:41
Hannah's Moon
Hannah's Moon (American Journey Book 5) - John A. Heldt

Claire and Ron Rasmussen have struggled with fertility and loss for the past eight years. Wanting nothing more than to be parents, Claire and Ron turn to adoption after their last heartbreaking loss. However, adopting a healthy, caucasian infant in present day California is another long and sometimes painful road. When a distant aunt and uncle, the Bells, learn of Claire and Ron's struggle, they know that they have the perfect solution hidden away in the basement of their house, The Painted Lady. Using their time travel tunnel, the Bells prepare to send Claire, Ron and Claire's brother David back to 1945 near the end of WWII. Adoption policies are much less strict and infants are abundant in Chattanooga, Tennessee in 1945. Claire, Ron and David arrive safely, move into a nice house and find a perfect bundle of joy, Hannah. They plan to stay several months until the adoption is finalized. They make friends with a wonderful neighbor and begin to enjoy life in a different time. Nevertheless, meddling in a different time can have issues, the Rasmussen's are being watched by the FBI and Ron is forced to enlist leaving Claire and David to wonder if they will all make it back to their own home and time.


This is the fifth installment of the American Journey series and was a little different than the previous time travel romances I've read in the series. The love in Hannah's moon was very much focused on family life making Hannah's Moon a balance between heartwarming and dramatic. I was very happy to see that the plot pivoted on adoption; although, as a mother, the first chapter broke me a bit and I had to put the book down for a while. After that though, I was transported back to 1945. John A. Heldt always done a wonderful job of conveying the time period through the eyes of his time travelers. This time, with the help of their neighbor, Margaret, the Rasmussen's are given a full southern welcome. I absolutely loved the adoption of Hannah and Margaret's childhood story helped to solidify their decision. Being set at the end of WWII, I was not expecting to learn much about the actual war, although, with Ron's enlistment I was very intrigued to learn about the USS Indianapolis and the what happened to the Navy members aboard the ship. The ending of Hannah's Moon is bittersweet, I got to revisit all of time travellers from past novels as the Bell's revealed a secret.

This book was provided for free in return for an honest review.

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review 2017-04-27 03:46
American Hookup: The New Culture of Sex ... American Hookup: The New Culture of Sex on Campus - Lisa Wade
Overall, a good book. I didn't necessarily learn anything new having graduated from college a few years ago and seen hookup culture firsthand. However, I think that this is an important book that brings the idea of hookup culture into the eye of academia.

The book is composed a of a lot of quotes from students, which felt a little dry and repetitive to me at times, but Wade does also provide previous research and insight into the things that the students discuss.

Wade did well incorporating intersectionality and how various people experience hookup culture differently and how it favors white, heterosexual men.

I also think that Wade did a good job of differentiating that hookups are not the problem, it's the culture that is often racist, homophobia, sexist, ableist, etc.

I would have liked for Wade to go a little more in depth as to how she set up her research. Little things like "other details have been changed and sometimes dramatized" is a bit concerning to me. Also, the fact that she used students in her class seems to push the ethical boundaries. As she writes about the students she talked to and interviewed, it is clear that she developed a close relationship to some them. While the students' stories wouldn't change, I think it just makes the whole project seem a little iffy on her part.
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review 2017-04-25 19:06
American Vampire Volume 4 by Scott Snyder, Rafael Albuquerque and Jordi Bernet
American Vampire, Vol. 4 - Scott Snyder,Rafael Albuquerque,Jordi Bernet

There were three stories in this volume and I enjoyed them all!

 

Pre-vampire Skinner Sweet and his childhood friend Jim Book, , 50's greaser vampire-hunter Travis Kidd and his badass hot rod, and lastly Calvin Poole living life as a black vampire in the 60's.

 

We were all over the place, time-wise, in this one, but that was cool because the times were interesting. Also, Skinner Sweet wasn't in this one all that much, which I thought was a good thing.

 

I do wish we got to see more of Pearl and Henry, but what we did see has me stoked for the next volume, which luckily is sitting there waiting for me on my reading table at home. Onward!

 

These may not be the best graphic novels ever, but I sure am enjoying the hell out of them just the same.

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review 2017-04-23 15:24
Killers of the Flower Moon by David Grann
Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI - David Grann

Killers of the Flower Moon is the true story of the slaughter of dozens of Osage Indians and how MANY people got away with it. It's SO over the top that if this were a fiction story I would say the author had overwritten it and that it wasn't realistic. David Grann has come at this story from two angles.

 

The Osage tribe reigned over much of the mid-west back in the day. By the time of this book, roughly the early 1920's, they were mostly moved onto what was thought to be worthless land in Oklahoma. Then oil was discovered there and their lives changed forever. The first angle was how the Osage were changed by the sudden influx of millions of dollars and how the white man viewed that; how they were jealous over that, and what they did about that.

 

The second angle comes from the law enforcement side of the story, and specifically the building up of the FBI. At the time the first murders occurred the FBI wasn't the FBI yet. By the time the investigation was in full swing, (keeping in mind that the Osage tribe had to basically beg and pay through the nose to get anyone to investigate or do anything at all about these murders), the FBI was officially called that and Mr. Hoover was in charge.

 

There is a third portion of the book, not exactly another angle, but a portion so unbelievable yet proven,(to my mind at least), to be true that it actually brought tears to my eyes. I can't get into more detail but trust me on this: it was horrifying. It was shameful. It was a wrong that's never been righted and I don't believe it ever can be.

 

Bravo to Mr. Grann for his extensive research on this case. A case that, until now, I had never heard of. That is an injustice. I believe Mr. Grann has done his damnedest to bring to light the wrongs that were committed here, and that alone is the only justice that the Osage can hope for at this late date.

 

I think we owe it to the Osage to read this book, and as such, I highly recommend it.

 

*Thanks to NetGalley and Random House/Doubleday for the e-ARC of this book in exchange for my honest review. This is it.*

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text 2017-04-22 20:11
Reading progress update: I've read 33%.
American Gods - Neil Gaiman

If this wasn't a group read, or Neil Gaiman, I would so DNF.

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