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text 2018-04-28 12:46
#readathon. Launched! Planned TBR
Terminal Alliance (Janitors of the Post-Apocalypse) - Jim C. Hines
Heroes In Training - Martin H. Greenberg,Jim C. Hines
Nevertheless, She Persisted: A Book View Cafe Anthology - Maya Kaathryn Bohnhoff,Mindy Klasky,Vonda N. McIntyre,Nancy Jane Moore,P. G. Nagle,Gillian Polack,Irene Radford,Deborah J. Ross,Dave Smeds,Sara Stamey,Jennifer Stevenson,Judith Tarr,Marie Brennan,Amy Sterling Casil,Brenda Clough,Leah Cutter,Marissa Doyle,
Lake Silence - Anne Bishop
Dark Heir - Faith Hunter
Burn Bright - Patricia Briggs
Cress - Marissa Meyer

It's starting to be a tradition with me to open with a Jim C. Hines book.  Unplanned until this time.  Terminal Alliance (Janitors of the Post-Apocalypse) - Jim C. Hines  kept getting bumped by library waitlist books, not fitting a reading challenge and other borrows.

 

I've got two anthologies handy for quicker stories, Heroes In Training - Martin H. Greenberg,Jim C. Hines  and Nevertheless, She Persisted.  Mostly next in series books.  Lots of not pictured variety in downloaded freebies and kindle unlimited borrows in case mood changes.

 

Nope, no way am I getting through all shown.  I do good to complete 1-3 books if I socialize and do all the activities.  Planning the TBR is half the fun!

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text 2018-04-01 10:27
March marches out...
The Case of the Baker Street Irregulars - Anthony Boucher
To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee
I Contain Multitudes: The Microbes Within Us and a Grander View of Life - Ed Yong
Burn Bright - Patricia Briggs
One Corpse Too Many - Ellis Peters
The Uncommon Reader - Alan Bennett
Miss Silver Comes to Stay - Patricia Wentworth
Miss Kopp's Midnight Confessions - Amy Stewart
The Moving Toyshop - Edmund Crispin
The House of the Cats: And Other Traditional Tales from Europe - Maggie Pearson

Either I was feeling generous, or I had a great reading month.  Since my RL wasn't as nice as my reading month, we'll go with great reading!

 

My total for March was 26 books.  Moonlight Reader's inspired reading version of the game Clue! (Cluedo to those in the Commonwealth), Kill Your Darlings, certainly helped keep my reading pace up, and as always, worked particularly well at getting the veterans off my TBR stacks.  

 

Of the 25 books, 2 were 5-star reads:

The Case of the Baker Street Irregulars by Anthony Boucher 

I Contain Multitudes: The Microbes Within Us and a Grander View of Life by Ed Yong 

 

I had 8 4.5 star reads too:

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee 

Burn Bright by Patricia Briggs 

One Corpse Too Many by Ellis Peters 

The Uncommon Reader by Alan Bennett 

Miss Silver Comes to Stay by Patricia Wentworth 

Miss Kopp's Midnight Confessions by Amy Stewart 

The Moving Toyshop by Edmund Crispin 

The House of the Cats: And Other Traditional Tales from Europe by Maggie Pearson 

 

 

 

Some stats, gussied up:

 

My TBR project:

I've set a book buying budget for each month that = 50% of the total books I read the previous month.  Any books not bought carry over to the next month.  

 

Last month I bought 11 out of the 15 budgeted, leaving me with 4 to carry over to April.  My total books read in March being 25 leaves me with a budget of 12 (I always round down; I figure this way, if I go over one month, there's a small error of margin). 

 

total books I can buy in April:  16

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text 2018-03-30 15:04
Books I Read This Month: March 2018
Children of Blood and Bone: The OrÏsha Legacy (Children of OrÏsha) - Tomi Adeyemi
The High Tide Club - Mary Kay Andrews
Burn Bright - Patricia Briggs,-Penguin Audio-,Holter Graham

So I managed to get through a lot of books this month. I read 38 books. I had a few duds, okay a lot of duds, but did have some really good 5 and 4 star reads. 

 

My favorite I think is going to go towards "Children of Blood and Bone." My least favorite is going to go to that Mary Alice Monroe book, "The High Tide Club."It is tied though with "Burn Bright" by Patricia Briggs. So there you go, I had two least favorite reads this month. 

 

5 stars

 

Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha ChristiePeril at End House by Agatha ChristieChildren of Blood and Bone by Tomi AdeyemiMen Explain Things to Me by Rebecca Solnit

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone by J.K. RowlingChecking Out by Nick SpaldingThe Nature of the Beast by Louise PennySparkling Cyanide by Agatha Christie

Half a Heart by Karen McQuestion

 

4 stars

 

The Belles by Dhonielle ClaytonSherlock Holmes Remastered by Arthur Conan DoyleBeastly by Alex FlinnThe Adventures of Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan Doyle

The Time of the Hunter's Moon by Victoria HoltTwo Kinds of Truth by Michael ConnellyBinti by Nnedi Okorafor

 

3 stars

 

Evil Under the Sun by Agatha ChristieThe Secret Adversary by Agatha ChristieThe Silmarillion by J.R.R. TolkienThe Summerhouse by Jude Deveraux

The Dark Half by Stephen KingThe Sign of the Four by Arthur Conan DoyleA Great Reckoning by Louise PennyTwo Fridays in April by Roisin Meaney

Home by Nnedi Okorafor

 

2 stars

 

Happiness by Heather HarphamBonfire by Krysten RitterPerfect by Judith McNaughtThe Long Way Home by Louise Penny

The Art of French Kissing by Brianna R. ShrumMy Husband's Wife by Jane CorryParis Ever After by K.S.R. Burns

 

1 star

 

Burn Bright by Patricia BriggsThe Darkest Minds by Alexandra BrackenFirst Grave on the Right by Darynda JonesThe High Tide Club by Mary Kay Andrews

 

DNF

 

Ancillary Justice by Ann LeckieThe People We Hate at the Wedding by Grant Ginder

 

I managed to finish my 52 Weeks challenge for The (Mostly) Dead Writer's Society. And I managed to get some books towards the Horror Aficionados Public Domain Challenge. 

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review 2018-03-25 21:09
Fang Fur and More
Burn Bright - Patricia Briggs

Charles and Anna are left as heads of the pack while Bran is off on a vacation to Africa, without this mate. Yeh it something is weird, but I'll not tell you what. So Charles if left with his mate and Leah. with all their issues and snipping at each other. Talk about a rock and a hard place, ouch. I know you're thinking poor Charles, hah ! those were the easy times. There are some wolves who live on the edge, the windings, bare sane if at all, there are under the pack protection, aka his. One very old and very powerful wolf is captured, her mate who holds enormous power asks for help. This is were you should start feeling sorry for Charles and Anna because things go really bad and have many strings attached. Somebody has betrayed them, perhaps somebody close. But they are not alone, they have the pack, and my favorite big bad wolf is prominent, Asil, the Moor.
Oh my, what a twisted knot. Charles and Anna , aww what a cute mated couple , blah blah blah. Asil, dark quiet mysterious and powerful is finally explored more in this book. His history, the glimpse allowed left me thirsty for more. He is such a tease. I want an Asil book, no I need one. The rest of the pack was interesting, and played well together.
I enjoyed it all, except Bran and... Bran went AWOL and acted out of character from what we've seen of him in the past. Something revealed about his possible motives for something way off base was sort of weird, I hope it doesn't lead anywhere. The mystery of who was pretty easy to figure out, the why wasn't. I was scratching my head going "Hey Wolf ?!?!? Didn't you get that ??? Hello ?" But they didn't hear me or Captain Obvious when he spoke to them.

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review 2018-03-23 01:40
I really enjoyed it, but it left me wanting more
Burn Bright - Patricia Briggs

I had this pretty much ready to go yesterday and the day before that, but I didn't like what I'd written -- it's not like I disagreed with myself (I'm funny that way), but I just had gone off on a tangent and ended up writing about things I didn't care that much about, and ignored the things I'd been thinking about since I read the book. This isn't exactly what I meant to talk about, nor is it as clear as I wanted things to be -- but it's close enough. Hope someone gets something out of it.
---

Anna was her father’s daughter, and her father believed in science and rational thinking. She’d been a werewolf for years now, and she still tended to think about it from a scientific viewpoint, as though lycanthropy were a virus.

 

Faced with a wall of briar-thorned vines straight out of a Grimms’ fairy tale, she’d never had it brought home so clearly that what she was and what she did was magic. Not Arthur C. Clarke magic, where sufficient understanding could turn it into a new science that could be labeled and understood. But a “there’s another form of power in the universe” magic. Something alien, almost sentient, that ran by its own rules-or none. Real magic, something that could be studied, maybe, but would never rest in neatly explainable categories.


I appreciated this look into Anna's thinking. It matches up with what we've seen of Mercy's take on magic, but not completely, underscoring the differences in t heir personalities and way of looking at the world.

 

Burn Bright takes place on the heels of Silence Fallen -- Bran's not back yet and Charles is handling things. At least as much as Leah will let him. We've known for quite some time that Bran's pack is full of misfits, wolves that need extra care and attention that they probably couldn't get elsewhere -- particularly older werewolves, the type who are nearing the point where they can't keep control. Asil is a prime example of this -- but now we learn that Asil actually is an example of an older wolf who's doing just fine and that there are a half-dozen or so living near the Marrock, but that don't come into town or have much at all to do with anyone not Bran, Charles or a small number of specific individuals.

 

Now, while the Marrock is gone, someone is targeting these wolves -- and all signs point to someone within the pack. Can Charles, Anna and others protect these pack members from this new threat? Can they identify the traitor in their midst, and will Charles have to kill someone he trusted to preserve the safety of all the wolves?

 

One thing I noticed last year doing my re-read of the Mercy and Alpha & Omega books was just how comfortable I felt in these books -- that holds true here, too. It doesn't matter about the peril being faced by Charles and Anna (or any of the rest of the pack), reading this book was a nice, relaxing time with old friends. Agatha Christie or Dorothy Sayers, she's not, but Briggs sure writes a cozy novel. I cannot put my finger on why -- if it's something in Briggs' style, her voice, the stories, a combination of the three -- but it doesn't matter. As long as she does that, she'll have loyal readers.

 

This was a very talk-y story (and maybe all the Charles and Anna stories skew this way, but this seemed a bit more pronounced). More than once I asked "Do we need to tell this story now? Can't we come back and chat about this later, you know, after everyone is safe?" Of course, the answer is now, and we need all the talk-y bits to get the understanding and information necessary to defeat the bad guys. Still, the author and readers know this, but Charles, Anna and the rest don't know that and I wish they displayed a greater sense of urgency.

 

Most of the talk-y portions were discussing the wildlings being targeted by the mysterious (and well-armed) forces at work here. Which at least pays off in the readers getting to know them -- which I greatly appreciate. The other person we get to know better is Leah, Bran's wife and his wolf's mate. Between these books and the Mercy novels we've gotten to know here a bit, but this novel fills that knowledge out. Between Leah and Chrissy (Adam's ex- in the Mercy books) Briggs displays a real talent in writing women that you cannot stand or trust, but have enough sympathy for that you can't just hate. They're manipulative, conniving, and self-promoting in ways that are clearly meant to set your teeth on edge -- but there's something very vulnerable about them, too.

 

There's a reveal or two later in the book that seem inevitable -- only because that's how stories work, even when (especially when?) everything is pointing in one direction, but there's no way an author of any experience would go with something so obvious. It's hard to get more specific while not giving away the details -- but those reveals ended up leaving me dissatisfied only because I called them so early. It feels like when you're watching a police procedural and identify the killer when the guest star makes their appearance in the first 10 minutes -- sure Castle might be charming, Bones' intern might be delightfully quirky, or Rizzoli might have some sort of compelling side-story, but the mystery part of the story is a disappointment because how is Morgan Fairchild not going to be the killer?

 

But the focus of the book is on the relationship between Charles and Anna, their mutual trust, the way they help each other in ways no one else can. That part of the novel is rock solid, and as long as Briggs delivers that, who's going to complain?

 

I thoroughly enjoyed this one, don't misunderstand me. And the more I learn about Bran's pack in Montana, the more I like it and the more I want to know. Asil, as always, was a joy. But . . . the more I think about Burn Bright the less satisfying it seems, the slighter it feels. I'm glad I read it, I'll likely gladly read it again -- and I look forward to the next adventure with these two. But I think Briggs could've -- and should've -- done better.

Source: irresponsiblereader.com/2018/03/22/burn-bright-by-patricia-briggs
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