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review SPOILER ALERT! 2017-04-25 10:25
Star Trek: S. C. E.: #20 Enigma Ship by J. Steven York, Christina F. York
Enigma Ship (Star Trek S.C.E., #20) - J. Steven York,Christina F. York

This time, the da Vinci encounters an alien ship marauding in space, swallowing up any ship that crosses its path - at the latest a Starfleet ship. Is the ship even intact and its crew alive still? And if so, how are they going to be rescued?

 

What follows is an interesting tale about reality, dreams and how to differentiate between those two. Definitely one of the better entries so far, at least story-wise. At some points the characterization is lacking (not only in the overall sense as was the case with most of the other previous parts), but also that at some points I had the impression that this story should be set much earlier in the season, as some of the issues coming up (Soloman etc) were dealt with much earlier already. So, that's kind of redundant.

 

I'll keep reading until Wildfire which is said to be turning point, right now - but if, by then, the series hasn't managed to entirely captivate me, I'll likely give up on it. The characters are still too bland, the stories too superficial to satisfy me.

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review 2017-04-23 16:41
Out in July
Hudson Valley Reflections: Illustrated Travel and Field Guide - Michael Adamovic

Disclaimer: ARC via Netgalley

 

                One of the things I want to do is drive though the Hudson River Valley.  I have travelled though part of it by train.  In fact, the Amtrak ride from NYC to Montreal is a stunning, beautiful trip.  I highly recommend everyone take that rail journey at least once.  I do, however, want to drive though part of those towns. 

 

                And now, after reading this book, I have a couple more places I want to stop.

                Adamovic looks at the Hudson valley though the lenses of seasons.  Along the way, he hits places of historical importance – such as Sleepy Hollow.  The focus is mostly on the glorious scenery.  Adamovic places the wildlife in context, in other words it is just seasonal behavior but also text that details the fauna and flora.  The end of the book contains a location map and directions, making the book a practical work of art.

 

                 The photos of the flowers and animals are quite beautiful, including those photos of insect eating plants.  The deer photo in particular was adorable.

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review 2017-04-21 12:10
Book Review of Giselda The Witch by J S Rumble
Giselda The Witch - J. F. S. Rumble

Giselda discovers that she will not be attending the same school as her friends; instead she will be going to Wigmore’s school for witches. Due to an unfortunate mistake she arrives a bit earlier than even she expected but soon settles in and makes a new friend through the fence.

 

Things are going well until some girls find out how she arrived at school and start to tease her about it. To prove that she is just as good at magic as everybody else Giselda agrees to travel up the mountain and steal from the dragon that lives there.

 

Review 5*

 

This is a sweet children's book aimed at children aged 4-10 years old. I loved it!

 

Giselda is a wonderful character and I really liked her. She is an eight year-old girl who finds out that she will not be attending the local school with her friends as she is a witch. Not realising water and witches don't mix, Giselda finds herself travelling to the school in a most unconventional way. When her classmates find out how she arrived at the school, she is teased badly. In order to prove she is good at magic, she accepts a dare.

 

As I said above, this book is a sweet children's book with an adventure included. It is ideal for children with short attention spans. It tackles topics such as friendship, bullying/teasing and teamwork. The school is not your typical witch/wizard school, nor is it like Hogwarts. Wigmore teaches their students to be bad (not evil) and play tricks on others. I liked meeting the other characters too. Tom is a young wizard who befriends Giselda through the fence that separates the two sections (girls and boys are taught separately). Beatrice and Emma are Giselda's nemeses and tease her unmercifully until danger in the form of a dragon makes them band together to solve a dangerous situation.

 

J.S. Rumble has written an entertaining chapter book that I thoroughly enjoyed. I love her writing style, which is not particularly fast paced though easy enough for children to follow whether reading on their own, or being read to by their parents. The flow is wonderful too. I would definitely consider reading more of her books in the future.

 

I highly recommend this chapter book to young children aged 4-10, and to adults looking for a chapter book to keep their little ones entertained. - Lynn Worton

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text 2017-04-20 14:41
The Great Gatsby - F. Scott Fitzgerald

shreya khubber mind tree

This book is a beautiful story that depicts the unexplored parts of human psychology. I read the book on my teacher's recommendation and found it really interesting. The novel describes a love triangle through which the author has succeeded to to make the reader aware of the real human nature. I would like to recommend this book for those who want to have a great experience of a story that is both gripping and meaningful in its own sense.

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review 2017-04-20 07:30
Miss Dimple Rallies to the Cause (Miss Dimple, #2)
Miss Dimple Rallies to the Cause - Mignon F. Ballard

 Set in small-town Northern Georgia during WWII, this series gives a great sense of time and place; it reminds me a lot of that old TV series Homefront (early 90's?).

 

As for the mystery though, it was o.k., but overly-convoluted.  If Ballard had been able to structure it differently it would have worked a lot better, but as is, it's more than a little hard to follow.  A skeleton is discovered during a school outing, the money from a bond rally goes missing, the town slacker goes missing, Miss Dimple's landlady is getting mysterious notes and someone is shot during the follies.

 

There are a lot of characters in this book and, told in third person, from the POV of several of them, the first few chapters felt like a hot mess - I couldn't keep anybody straight.  Even after they sorted themselves out I never felt entirely confident about who was who as the POV shifted - I had to remind myself often about how someone was related to everyone else.  Each chapter starts with the internal dialogue of one of the characters, but it's never the same one, and they all remain unnamed.  This is likely done on purpose because it's the criminal, but when it wasn't, it became overly confusing.

 

The author kept using rifle and shotgun interchangeably; for someone who knows the difference, this is a big deal: a rifle shoots a single bullet at a time; a shotgun shoots a single shell full of tiny bullets (called buckshot) that spray outwards soon after exiting the barrel.  So, when a shotgun was reported missing, but later someone was shot and had a single bullet wound, it messed with the plot and my head; until the terms were used interchangeably again and it became obvious what was going on, I thought there were two weapons.

 

Still, I enjoyed the story and the characters.  The series is "Miss Dimple" but really the mystery solving is a team effort on the part of the women holding everything together while the war rages on.  At the end it becomes clear that there are several threads of mischief running through Elderberry at the same time, but really, I stuck around to see if Will would show up for Charlie one last time before being shipped off.

 

                                                                                              

 

 

Page count: 262
Dollars banked: $3.00

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