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review 2017-05-29 09:50
Judy Moody Predicts the Future - Megan McDonald,Peter H. Reynolds

Loved it!

I am a huge fan of the Judy Moody books. They are easy to read, simple yet fun. Each one is filled with hilarious adventures.

I love Judy's character and that she is not afraid to be herself. The series shows young girls that it is okay to have other moods besides happy.

A great continuation of the series.

A very cute stories with hilarious misadventures.

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review 2017-05-25 19:22
The History and Uncertain Future of Handwriting - Anne Trubek  
The History and Uncertain Future of Handwriting - Anne Trubek

After a slow couple of months my reading has picked up again: I'm finishing more, and I'm enjoying what I'm reading. The sad aspect of this is that I keep finishing books that I want everyone else to pick up, and mostly no one does.

This is an exception. It belongs on the odd shelf I don't have specifically, but can't resist reading from, called "History of a Thing". While it isn't funny exactly, there is a lightness of tone that makes this a pleasant break from heavier reading, like say, about Nixon and Mao, to pick a topic out of thin air and not off the cover of another book lying around the house. It's fascinating to learn at some depth about a very narrow topic. Not surprisingly, this book is a distillation of a topic Trubek has been teaching in college for years. Specialization is awesome: I've never thought about all the different kinds of writing together until now.

I love this post-book feeling of erudition. Two days after I finished the book I can't recall anything specific that I learned, which isn't really the point. I've grasped the gestalt. I've placed my own flirtation with calligraphy (highly recommended as a means to achieving a legible handwriting) into the appropriate context.

There are a number of people worried about the fact that schools aren't teaching cursive. I'm not bothered. I've done my share of handwriting and it hurts and it's slow, and I'm one of only two people I know who can write a cursive others can read. Admittedly, the time spent learning keyboarding will no doubt also become wasted time at some point in the Offspring's lives, in favor of something newer and easier for more people. That's fine.

Favorite bit: seeing all the different types of clerks/scribes/copyists there were a fairly short time ago. Poor Bartleby and Bob Cratchit!

Library copy

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text 2017-05-23 00:05
Reading progress update: I've listened 681 out of 1983 minutes.
The Once and Future King - T.H. White,Neville Jason

Finished the first book and started on the second.

 

I feel like taking a break, though, because it's feeling very long. The performance is pretty good, but it's more a less just a series of linked adventures so far, and my attention sometimes wanders.

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review 2017-05-17 04:06
The Handmaid's Tale - Review
The Handmaid's Tale - Margaret Atwood

Better never means better for everyone, he says. It always means worse, for some.

- Chapter 32

 

This is the story of Offred (of Fred). She is a handmaid in a society that has difficulty reproducing effectively. Fertile women are "given to" powerful men, in order to bear them children.

 

This is a scary and powerful tale. It isn't full of action and adventure, but a story told quietly, from Offred's point of view. We see glimpses of her life before, and into her current situation. The end was sort of abrupt and open-ended. But some things just aren't meant to be wrapped up in a bow. There is a great deal of emotion packed into this book and I'm glad I finally read it. People have been suggesting I read this book for years. So, when the series came out, I knew I had to read it before I watched. 

 

The scariest thing about this book is how subtle, gradual changes can lead to something so awful before you even know what's happening. One of the quotes in the book said things may not seem ordinary now, but after a time they become ordinary. I believe this is true, little changes add up and gradually become normal, and before you know it society is really messed up.

 

I choose this book when I landed on the GO space in Booklikes-opoly - giving me a free choice.

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text 2017-05-08 00:00
OT: My ancestry - again

Reading the results of the DNA test has made me consider my identity. Before we had the results, we assumed we were more or less 100 % Scandinavian, but it turns out we actually have about 10 % less Scandinavian ancestry than the average Swede. It's certainly given me food for thought.

We've always been different and considered different by others, but is this the explanation? That we're partly Irish (and Iberian)? Because being partly Karelian and Wallonian is no different than most people here.

All this has made me wonder what actually makes us who we are and if this new knowledge in some way influences what I consider 'home' or where I'm going in life. Has our family been shaped by our 'exotic' DNA?

My conclusion, that is by no means final, is that while it's fascinating to find out more about our past, it's not where we come from that matters, it's where we belong - and that's a whole different question. In short, this hasn't helped me decide what to do with my life, but it's been a lot of fun.

If you're the least bit interested in your family history or indeed any kind of history, I can really recommend taking this sort of test.

Source: crimsoncorundum.dreamwidth.org/179131.html
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