logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: goodwill
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-02-09 16:24
FRIENDSHIP: A True Story of Adventure, Goodwill, and Endurance - Francis Mandewah,Sr. Rosanne Rustemeyer SSND

Friendship: A True Story of Adventure, Goodwill, and Endurance by Francis Mandewah
Starts out with the author as a young child and his job on the farm in west Africa. Interesting learning about the village and how it operated.
After some education he lives with his cousin at the diamond mines. Church is very prominent.
Struggles with chores, walking 3 miles to school and still gets punished because the cousins wife didn't like him.
Ownership of the diamond mine details are told. Prayers and passages from the Bible help him along to achieve his goals of just getting educated.
He meets a man who is like a mentor and he is able to help with finances and other things. Love the travel and how he is able to do the things he needs to do.
Love the paying it forward and lifetime of travel and experiences and that it's brought up to the times we live in today.
Received from the author and this is my honest review.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
photo 2014-11-30 19:35
New Additions to Home Library

Collective book haul over Summer and Fall

Like Reblog Comment
text 2014-09-06 04:15
THIFT STORE/OLLIES HAUL + 3 SWAP BOOKS + 1 GIVEAWAY BOOK & MORE! *u*

So, a week or so ago, I went out thrift shopping with my mother and found a load of great stuff--mostly fiction. And then, some time after, my dad and I found this place called Ollies, which sells bargain books. A lot of YA titles, but I did find some interesting ones.

*
Oh my GOSH!
When I found Sorcery and Cecilia, I literally squealed...in front of everyone..in the middle of the shop. Don't judge me. WSS was just stuck in between two random books at Ollies, and it looked so lonely, I felt the need to take it home. It may be just a summarizing of the story which everyone knows and I love, but I'm hoping I enjoy it anyway.
*

*
I found the second Temeraire series book--I do own the first but have not yet read it, but I found this and I just could not pass it up--now I'll be able to read both of them together. Beauty by Robin McKinley had been sitting on my PBS wishlist for quite a while and it was offered up to me when I actually had a credit, unlike usual, where I have to turn down dozens of wishlist books because I'm lacking in creditz. Woe is me. It's a retelling of Beauty and The Beast, one of my favourite fairytales.
*

*
Two classics that I have never read--how exciting. Just your average paperbacks, but I'm happy I can read them now. I've always loved anything to do with sailing--maritime is one of favourite genres and yet I have so much in that area to read--The Aubrey/Martin series, Moby Dick, and the Hornblower saga, among others. I love this cover and I've been told it's a very good book, and I'm an addict for the classics.
As much as I dislike this "looks like a Halloween costume" cover, I've heard mixed things about The Scarlet Letter and it sounds like a good book.
*

*
I found two Puffin classics at Ollies: Kim by Rudyard Kipling, the same guy who wrote The Jungle Books, which I have also not read. {On a side note, imagine that little black and white face peeking out at you from behind little red leather books--wouldn't you pick him up?} I also found The Phoenix and The Carpet by E. Nesbit, who I only just found out was EDITH Nesbit. *facepalm* Forgetting that stupidity, I am happy to report that the book that comes before Phoenix is also available as a Puffin Classic- Five Children and It, which has now gone on my Wishlist. Very excited for these. {I fear I say that about almost every book, get used to it}.
*

*
Yet another classic I have yet to read, I found this little red hardback right in front of Kim at Ollies--there were a bunch to collect, including Jane Eyre, Little Women, a lot of Dickens and The Woman In White, all of which I already own. A nice little copy with a ribbon bookmark, my only complaint is that the illustrations are extremely blurry--I assume because of that that this is a scanned copy. At least I can read it now. Then I found a Readers Digest Select Editions {no, I don't collect these, because what's the fun in only having parts of novels?} that includes: Letter From Home by Carolyn Hart, PS I Love You by Cecelia Ahern, The Promise of A Lie by Howard Roughan, and the reason I got this in the first place, The Curious Incident Of The Dog In The Night-Time by Mark Haddon. I've heard many things about "Curious Incident.." and I've been well....curious to read it. :P There's interesting mini-bios, afterwords and interviews after each chunk of their novels, giving insight into the author and the story, which is nice.
*

*
I won "Songs For Ophelia" on Goodreads giveaway, and it was sent signed by Theodora herself. She also sent me a sweet card with a bird on it, thanking me. It's a small collection of fantasy poetry by her, and from I've read so far, they're lovely.
I've been dying to read the Gormenghast Trilogy for a while, on recommendation of many many people. Thank you so much to a LibraryThing member from my Virago Modern Classics group from sending this to me all the way from the UK! Another plus is that the actor from the mini-series, Jonathan Rhys Meyers is on the cover, and while it's a moderately evil face, it's still a hot face. :P
*

*
A modern cover of a Virago Modern Classic sent to me from a member of the VMC group on LibraryThing. =D
The Elric Saga, I believe, is a series of six books. The one I found at the thrift store is an omnibus edition of the first three {what a great cover!} and I know there's a second omnibus just as beautiful of the last three, I just need to find it {if I like it, that is.} High fantasy is more in my taste, so I should enjoy it.
*

*
Attracted by the lovely cover, I found A Country Life at the first thrift store I visited. It's a collection of insights and memories of Roy Strongs time in the English country with his wife. It severely piqued by interest, so I snatched it up like the book gobbler I am. In a similar vein, and for the same "loved the cover" reasons {being an Anglophile helps a lot, too} I found "My Love Affair With England" by Susan Allen Toth, a travelers memoirs about her time there. This will be the perfect book with a cup of camomile and some biscuits--the British meaning of biscuits that is.
*

*
Sons of Moriarty is the first thing I spotted at Ollies, being the Holmesian I am. It is yet another collection of further adventures of Holmes, edited by Loren D. Estleman. It includes Anne Perry, Adrian Conan Doyle and the man himself, among others. It is authorized by the Doyle estate, which gives me hope that they are well selected stories.
Speaking of mysteries, I found a book that has long been in my TBR pile {or mountain, rather} and a sentence of the inner flap made me pick it up " "To Auriel, I will give the gift of gold..." So begins the letter that young Ned Warriner possesses, stuffed inside the pages of a leather bound book" Enough said. It's set is 1609.
*

*
I was so happy to find I Never Promised You A Rose Garden! The cover is amazing and I've been told to read it over and over again by almost everyone I've met, as they said I could relate to it. It's the story of a mentally ill girl who creates a fantasy world inside her head, refusing to come to terms with reality, and the doctor who helps her. A vintage copy, I found it right beside Indian In The Cupboard, {also a nice cover} a children's classic I have never read. It should be a short sweet read.
*
 
*
I found these two together, as if they were meant for my shelf. Secondary to Regency and Victorian Eras, I love anything arthurian, medieval or renaissance themed. I've heard that Sharon key Penman is the queen of writing historical fiction in this period, so when I saw this I decided that it would be my first by her. I hope that it lives to the promise of the epic cover. Gilt, with its beautifully embossed cover, is a YA novel of love and betrayal during the times of Henry VIIII. {Can you expect anything else in that court?} From what I've seen on Goodreads, it has reasonably low ratings, but I'll give it go anyway.
*
 
*
These two I only picked up for the covers, and I'm very unsure about. The first being what I'm guessing is a mystery in 1950s New Orleans and the second being a post-apocalyptic fantasy about a demon girl that's got archangels and stuff? *shrugs* I won't be reading these for some time, as I'm starting my Virago Modern Classics marathon soon, but I'll definitely give them a chance.
*

*
Another YA. From the gist of the inner flap, I'm hoping that it's a historical fantasy about a girl who's a witch. The cover reminds me of Ophelia from Hamlet. {Here's to hoping she doesn't meet the same fate!} It's the first in a series. The Blood Of Flowers is a historical fiction novel about a girl who weaves carpets in 17th century Persia. I hope it's wonderful.
*

*
And lastly, my two books from PBS. Lady's Maid is a historical fiction novel about the fictional maid of Elizabeth Barrett-Browning and Robert Browning, the famous Victorian poet lovers. I'm ecstatic to read this as well as A Good Woman, a novel set in 1912, about a woman's experiences with the Titanic sinking, love and the First World War. These books are totally me.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2014-02-14 02:27
I Hit The Goodwill Jackpot! (Book Haul)
Never Let Me Go - Kazuo Ishiguro
A Woman of Independent Means - Elizabeth Forsythe Hailey
Storm Glass - Maria V. Snyder
In the Time of the Butterflies - Julia Alvarez
The Last Letter from Your Lover - Jojo Moyes

I can't believe my bounty. Many of these were on my wish list and have wanted for some time. They are paperback copies all in like new condition and priced for $1.99. I couldn't be happier.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
quote 2013-12-15 16:38
A man goes out on the beach and sees that it's covered with starfish that have washed up in the tide. A little boy is walking along, picking them up and throwing them back in the water.
'What are you doing, son?' the man asks. 'You see how many starfish there are? You'll never make a difference.'
And the boy pauses thoughtfully, picks up another starfish, and throws it back into the ocean. 'It sure made a difference to that one,' he said.
Now I'll Tell You Everything (Alice, #25) - Phyllis Reynolds Naylor

(mentioned in Now I'll Tell You Everything by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor, story adapted from the essay "The Star Thrower" by Loren Eiseley)

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?