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review 2018-11-12 20:44
Children of Time by Adrian Tchaikovsky (audiobook)
Children of Time - Adrian Tchaikovsky,Mel Hudson

This book is still unadulterated awesome the third time through (second time by audio).

 

I love how it came down to the acceptance of the other through empathy and I love the alien spider mentality. Also, Holsten's mini-breakdowns were plausible and really fun to read.

 

Seriously, it's unadulterated awesome. Intelligent spiders in space battling the last humans for the control of the only habitable planet around. Guess who wins? You'll love the answer. I know I do. Plus it's a fun ride and at one point we have a decanted subculture running around on a sleeper ship. The spiders even have crazy biotech and literal ant computers (sort of like Hex).

 

I especially love how the spiders manage to out-humanity humanity.

(spoiler show)
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review 2018-11-12 03:46
The Gathering Storm, The Wheel of Time #12 by Brandon Sanderson and Robert Jordan
The Gathering Storm - Robert Jordan,Brandon Sanderson

There was an understandable amount of fanfare around the release of 'The Gathering Storm'. Jordan's death in 2007 left many fans wondering if they would ever see the end of the beloved series. The announcement that Brandon Sanderson would finish the series was a relief - though I had never heard of him - and anticipation began building. 'Knife of Dreams' had began the process of moving the many and varied story-lines back towards the single arc of the march towards the Last Battle. 'The Gathering Storm' reaps the benefit of that with two killer story arcs.

 

 

Rand has been trapped in his flesh case of emotion ever since his capture and beating at the hands of Elaida's Aes Sedai. He has been moving ever more towards hardness and retreats further from any hope of a life after confronting the Dark One. As he moves into Arad Doman to head off the Seanchan and attempt to repair the kingdom that has arguably suffered the most at the hands of the Forsaken, he is about to be pushed beyond the brink. Cadsuane, Nynaeve, and Min can do little but watch, and Aviendha is dealing with her own problems and avoids Rand, which probably doesn't help his situation. He has an interesting meeting with Tuon, now at the helm of the Seanchan Empire.

 

Egwene, however, is one hundred percent winning the game all the time. Her imprisonment in the White Tower continues to work to her advantage. Siuan, Gareth Bryne, and, shockingly, Gawyn along with some back-up singer Aes Sedai POVs lead up to a satisfying climax to the divided White Tower story-line. Just imagine me gushing for several paragraphs. I loved every minute of it.

 

Plain and simple - this is the best overall book since 'The Shadow Rising', a bit ironic seeing as how the breakout star of that book - Mat Cauthon - is the sole liability of 'The Gathering Storm'.

 

On my first read of the book when it came out I didn't really notice the discrepancy in Mat's character - he had never been a favorite, and there is too much awesome going on elsewhere in these pages - but on this reread with everything being experienced so close together the difference was glaring.

 

Sanderson does an excellent job of continuing the story that Jordan left behind, but he's not funny and his attempt to conjure Mat's 'wool-headed' conception of women came off as misogyny rather than charmingly naive. That opening diatribe at the opening appearance of his character was almost painful.

 

But, I never did mind about the little things.

 

Wrapping up, there is very little Perrin here - he examines some wagons - and Faile takes care of some business. Thom is with Mat and holding on that letter of his....

 

The Wheel of Time

 

Next: 'Towers of Midnight'

 

Previous: 'New Spring'

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review 2018-11-12 00:11
Keep you guessing until the last pages
The Last Time I Lied - Riley Sager

What I enjoyed about this one is the twists and turns happening all throughout the novel. You think it’s one thing, but it’s leading to another, yet out comes another possible solution to the mystery however it ends up being another red herring and so on. The guessing games keep the book on your toes.

 

The plot flows through smoothly, alternating between past and present so you get a feel for the background story on the events leading up as to why Emma is back. There were times where you had to question her sanity  because her behavior was erratic and unstable. As mentioned before, the guessing games throughout the novel kept the plot going and exciting to read. Expect mean girl behavior and shenanigans, and Emma’s character overall isn’t too likable but tolerable at the most. Vivian isn’t any better but the role she takes upon herself as a ‘big sister’ is endearing and gets instant idolization from Emma.

 

What I loved the most about this book is I wasn’t expecting such a great ending. I was thinking it was going to be a lackluster one at the most with a simple explanation as to what was behind the girls disappearances. It’s not until literally, the last pages of the novel where you get hit with a mega surprise and it was instant mind blow. I was left shocked for a fair amount of time as it was expertly done.

 

I heard more good things about Sager’s other works so I’ll definitely be picking them up. Hope they’re just as good as this one!

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review 2018-11-11 17:28
2 Escudos: "NewTales of Space And Time" by Raymond J. Healy
New Tales of Space and Time - Ray Bradbury,Isaac Asimov,Anthony Boucher,A.E. van Vogt,Kris Neville,Reginald Bretnor,Cleve Cartmill,P. Schuyler Miller,Gerald Heard,Raymond J. Healy,Frank Fenton,Joseph Petracca

(Original Review, 1980-09-11)


I tend to think in too cynical channels, and some comments sort of swept me back to the days when I found a Pocketbook (that's the trademarked name, not the generic) called NEW TALES OF SPACE AND TIME on the racks in our local US Import bookshop, plunked down my 2 escudos, and got COMPLETELY blown away on SF.
 
 
If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review.
 
 

 

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review 2018-11-09 09:33
Super-Time: "Thrice Upon a Time" by James P. Hogan
Thrice Upon a Time - James P. Hogan


(Original Review, 1980-11-06)



The most well thought out model of time-travel I have ever seen in a novel was in Hogan's "Thrice Upon a Time". This book ascribes to the "reset" theory of world-lines; if you send a message into the past (no matter travels cross-time in this book but it doesn't seem to be ruled out) that says "kill me, I am about to do something very rude in the present, and I should really be stopped", then the people back then get to act on the information while you wait in the present, with your teeth clenched, for the effects of your message to ripple forward and absolve (dissolve?) you.

 

 

If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review.

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