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review 2018-02-16 16:07
You're Never Weird on the Internet (Almost): A Memoir - Felicia Day
For more reviews, check out my blog: Craft-Cycle

I listened to the audiobook and it was amazing! It was read by Felicia Day and Joss Whedon (foreword), which made it that much better.

I didn't know much about Felicia Day before checking this out from the library. I knew she was a gamer and had seen her on Tabletop, but I didn't know much else. My husband told me not to watch The Guild, because I wouldn't like it. Joke's on him. I immediately started binge-watching it and loved it. It was even funnier after hearing about some of the random things about filming in the book (baby with a power-strip anecdote). 

This is a hilarious book. Day goes through many major events in her life from homeschooling, becoming a violin prodigy, filming The Guild, to her fame afterward. There are some dark places along the way, but I loved how Day used those moments to call out bad things in the world (harassment of women who game) and motivate the reader to create change. 

Well-written, extremely funny. I am now a huge fan of Felicia Day. Great read, I highly recommend getting the audio-book. 
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review 2018-02-05 23:09
Nothing to fear but fear itself? Not for the people in these books.
Deep Dark Fears - Fran Krause
The Creeps: A Deep Dark Fears Collection - Fran Krause

I'm going to cover two books in this post. They're the first two books of a series and I read them a few weeks apart at the end of last year. (Yes, I'm still working on reviews from last year. Yes, I am annoyed with myself.)


The first book is Fran Krause's Deep Dark Fears which is an adult graphic novel. The majority of the content is gleaned from submissions received by the author on his website although a few are from his wife and himself. As the title suggests, this is a collection of fears harbored by people and then put into a comic format. (The illustrations are really great by the way.) And while these are legitimate fears that people have they're not all totally scary. Some of them are so out there that they're humorous...although to the person who submitted it I guess it's not funny at all. From the content, it seems that the majority of people developed these fears/phobias when they were still children from adult family members who told them horrifying things. Note to adults: Please think about what you're telling your kids because you never know what they'll hold onto and how they'll twist it in their minds.


An example of the 'fears' illustrated inside. [Source: Bored Panda]


The second in the series is called The Creeps and it continues the thread of bringing to life some of the most bizarre fears you can (or maybe can't) imagine. I have to say that one of them freaked me out so much that I had to put the book down for a while. (It was about AI.) I also learned that something I had thought was universally known is not in fact known to many people outside of the Southern United States. When you or someone you know has a sudden shiver have you ever explained it by saying, "Someone just walked over my grave."? Now imagine if you had never heard that and then someone said it to you in an offhand manner. Would that totally freak you out? A lot of the things that people are scared of seemed quite niche and silly while others were super dark and gory. It's a really great mixture.


See how creepy this is to the unfamiliar? [Source: Bookspoils]


Both books are really quick reads that can be devoured in a single afternoon (or train ride). I especially liked that they were presented in the form of a graphic novel instead of in short story format. Both books combined were a 10/10 if you're into creepy dark humor.


What's Up Next: Fearsome Creatures of the Lumberwoods: 20 Chilling Tales from the Wilderness by Hal Johnson


What I'm Currently (Re)Reading: The Neverending Story by Michael Ende


Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
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review 2017-11-26 09:00
Goodreads' Censorship: G.R. Reader's Off-Topic
OFF-TOPIC: The Story of an Internet Revolt by G.R. Reader - G.R. Reader
The closest source I have to hand "the doctrine that knowledge, truth and morality exist in relation to culture, society, or historical context, and are not absolute" does seem to cover some of the arguments dealing with Goodreads' censorship. I don't deny that the world's a complex place but when you get down to the nitty gritty I don't see a third space we've carved out for yourselves between relative and absolute values. Literature is not just a social pursuit - if it was, it would be a hobby. Name an education free of the teaching of it in our society? And why would it be universal to our society in that way? It is, in Donne's sense, involved with our social sphere in a way that buying small-gauge railway models is not. But if you are determined that literature is just a social pursuit then indeed, we have no further point to discuss.
Amazon are compelling us. One may wish to view it simply as they are offering each of us a choice, and that if sufficient numbers of us choose then we will have in effect voted to change our society - in ways we may not have considered, in ways we may not want, in ways that a minority of us who have never purchased anything from them are powerless to resist. They are no more compelling us than cigarette manufacturers, or the government, or drug dealers, or manufacturers of greenhouse gases, or the nazis, and so on, and so on. I see the logic of laissez-faire capitalism, even extended to the cultural and social sphere. 
If you "suffered" at the "hands" of GR, read on


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