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review 2017-08-17 21:49
Emeralds In The Attic by Jan Fields
Emeralds In The Attic - Jan Fields

This cozy mystery was interesting and a quick read. I like that it didn't start the same as so many of the others. The group of women did go up to the attic looking for something but the mystery wasn't immediately found there. It still involved something that was found in the attic but it because of what happened later. I liked this author's writing style better than a lot of the others. The ending was rather uneventful but I still enjoyed the book.

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review 2017-08-16 19:04
The September Society - Charles Finch

I enjoyed this book but it was pretty slow paced for my liking. There were a few details that I figured out and knew what would happen eventually. There was also a lot of political discussions and talk about the clubs that seemed like filler to make the book longer. I lost interest in those parts. Otherwise, it was a good story and even though I knew some things in advance I didn't mind and actually looked forward to the time when it would happen. I'm just giving it 3 stars because of the stuff that didn't seem relevant to the story and made the book drag.  I did not mind the parts where he wants to ask Lady Gray to marry him but doesn't for so long because he is insecure.  I know some guys who are the same way so it seemed realistic to me.

 

Charles Lenox, amateur detective. receives a visitor one morning.  Lady Annabell is worried about her son who is missing.  She has already lost her husband and couldn't bear losing her son as well.  She told Lenox her story and when she told Lenox there was a dead cat in the middle of his room, stabbed with a letter opener, he decided to go at once. There he found several other things that seemed odd and one was a card that says "The September Society."  Lenox was sure that Lady Annabelle's son George had left him clues.

 

Throughout this story, Lenox is caught up in his thoughts about Lady Gray.  He wants to ask her to marry him but he is insecure and worried about ruining their friendship. When he sees a man coming from her home he starts to worry that he is too late and she has already chosen another man.  There are several times in the story when he sees her and wants to talk to her and ask her to marry him but the time never seems right and there are other people pulling her away.  

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review 2017-08-10 05:01
A Beautiful Blue Death - Charles Finch

This was a good cozy mystery. Charles Lenox doesn't have to work because of his status but he enjoys a good mystery. He is asked by a friend, Lady Gray, to look into the death of a young girl that had been one of her maids. The girl recently went to work at another house and three months later was found dead. The owner of the house was sure it was suicide but no one else believed it. Lenox decided to take on the case but the owner of the house and the police shut him out.  Lenox has to ask questions carefully since he wasn't officially working with the police on the case.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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review 2017-08-04 11:31
Red Bones
Red Bones - Ann Cleeves
 

 
This was such an interesting mystery. Ann Cleeves continues to amaze me with her incredible writing. 
She weaves her tales in such a way that you can't be sure who the murderer is. It could be any of them or, was it really just an accident and a suicide?

Two young Archaeologists look for evidence of a merchant's house on an old woman's property on Whalsay. They thought they had found some red fragments of pottery as they dug but it turned out to be red bones. They were excited that they may have found the bones of the merchant but someone else on the Island was not as excited. The old woman was later found shot to death. It was presumed to be an accident but later there was another death. It looked like a suicide but didn't make sense. Perez realized he needed to learn more about the families that live on Whalsay and figure out what is going on before more people die.
 
 

 

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review 2017-07-19 23:01
Recommended to those who enjoy action novels, spy novels, thrillers, and definitely to Baldacci fans.
Zero Day - David Baldacci

Thanks to NetGalley and to the publisher, MacMillan, for offering me an ARC copy of this book that I freely chose to review.

David Baldacci is one of these authors whose names a reader (and even a non-reader) cannot escape. His books are widely distributed and he always seems to have a volume or two in the bestsellers list (no, not the Amazon one on a little-known genre, but the real thing). Despite all that (or perhaps because of it, as sometimes some names seem so familiar that I feel as if I had already read/watched or whatever it is they do, them before) I had never read any of his books. I saw that coinciding with a book launch, NetGalley was offering a copy of the first book in the John Puller series, and I decided perhaps it was time I read him. (I don’t have any specific opinions on best sellers as such and I don’t necessarily avoid them as a matter of principle but I do prefer to discover them early on, so I can make my own mind up).

The story, narrated in the third person, mostly follows John Puller, a military investigator that is all you probably would wish for in such a character. He has complex family relations (including a genius brother imprisoned for life for treason), he has seen his share of combat and has the medals and the scars to prove them, he is as skilled at fighting as he is at investigating, and although usually he works as part of a team, he can be a one-man-band when required (as is the case here).  There are some moments (like the first chapter) when we follow other characters, but this is for a very good reason, and we, by and far, experience the events from Puller’s perspective. Of course, that does not mean we know everything he knows, because the book hides information at times and that means there are some surprises (the number of surprises might depend on how close your attention and on how many books of the genre you have read).  The story is a combination of a spy story with highly skilled military investigator/hero in charge, and a more standard police procedural, with big secrets, conspiracies, and environmental issues thrown in for good measure. There are hints of a possible romance, but nobody is up to the task, and the time frame is very tight for such developments.

The investigation is very detailed, and we get to know quite a few of the characters in the small West Virginian town of Drake, a coal mining place that has become almost a ghost town due to the environmental and economic consequences of the exploitation and depletion of its resources by the sole industry in the area. Baldacci shares as much loving detail on the way the coal industry works (or at least some far-from-exemplary companies), as he does on everything else: the way the military works, the different roles of the investigating and security agencies and how they interact, the equipment used, the weaponry… This might be too much for some readers, but I am sure it will make others very happy. I did enjoy more the discussions of the environmental issues and the socio-economic effects of the coal-extracting industry than the details about the equipment, but there is plenty of action and intrigue to keep readers of mystery, and also spy novels, entertained.

My favourite character is Sam Cole, the female police officer in charge of the investigation. She has problems of her own and also a difficult relationship with her family, and seems the perfect match for Puller. I would probably have preferred the novel to be about her, but that is not the genre or the focus of it. In many ways, her character is the one that makes us see Puller as something more than a perfect fighting and investigating machine, all professional, and efficient. Yes, he has a cat, some sort of relationships with his father, and an interesting dynamic with his brother, but she is the only person who is not a relative he seems to relate to at a level beyond the casual, and it is not only because it is helpful to his mission.  

I agree with comments that the novel is formulaic in many ways (Puller survives several attempts on his life, has to subvert orders and get inventive to save the day and manages to pull an incredible feat at the end), although as I haven’t read other Baldacci’s books, I cannot comment on how much better or worse Puller is compared to some of his other heroes (Reacher is mentioned often in the reviews, sometimes agreeing he’s as good, others denying it). I imagine once you have such a following as an author, you know what your public wants and expects, so it is perhaps disingenuous to accuse him of writing to a formula. It is not a genre I read often, and I prefer something more distinctive, less heroic, and with a bit of humour.

The book is well paced, the writing supports the story rather than calling attention to itself (as I said, some readers might find there is too much detail, but I doubt his fans will, and after reading the acknowledgements, it is clear that he is well-informed and has had access to first-hand information not many would have), and if you like lone heroes with a conscience, John Puller makes a pretty decent one. Recommended to those who enjoy action novels, spy novels, thrillers, and definitely to Baldacci fans. I am not sure I’d say I’ve become one of them, but I might try another one of his stories at some point.

 

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