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review 2017-09-18 17:22
he Supreme Might of Love by Christa Tomlinson
The Supreme Might of Love - Christa Tomlinson

In all fairness, gladiators are not my slice of salami. 

I read this book for a challenge because of the Mars character. He disappointed me a quite a bit, since his true nature never got a chance to shine. As for the mortals, as entertaining their relationship was in the beginning, it all turned to lust and then love all too quickly, at the same time failing to produce any hint of chemistry between them. 

The book is short, and of course, it limits the opportunities for the characters and relationships to develop fully. The plot was a bit of a cliche, the chemistry, like I said, was non-existent, the sex was meh. 

Prompt pic:

 

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review 2017-09-18 05:38
Will & Patrick Meet the Mob (Wake Up Married #5) by Leta Blake
Will & Patrick Meet the Mob (Wake Up Married Book 5) - Alice Griffiths,Leta Blake

I never liked Owen and I hate him now. He is no better than Ryan where it comes to manipulating Will.

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review 2017-09-18 05:34
Will and Patrick's Happy Ending (Wake Up Married #6) by Leta Blake
Will & Patrick's Happy Ending (Wake Up Married Book 6) - Alice Griffiths,Leta Blake

I really wanted to strangle Owen in this one, even more than Tony. 

And Will, but not so much, maybe a little ;) ...cause he's too cute for words. 

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text 2017-07-10 11:06
Top 10 Reasons to Consult a Best Family Lawyers Sydney

In terms of legalities there are lots of lawyers that have specialization. Hence if you are looking for a professional that you need for family related cases then consult best family lawyers sydney. Family lawyers cover issues that involve, divorce, child custody & support, domestic violence, property settlement and estate and wills planning. These are among the issues they handling, so for better result you have to find one that is not only have a good communication also, check out how many family law cases they are able to win.

 

Best family lawyers Sydney work on several cases and family disputes. They help and guide those who need them from filing cases to courts up to counselling which they think a great help to their clients. Here, will give you the top 10 reasons why a family law lawyers are needed.

 

  • These days it’s not secret at all that lots of couples applied for pre-nuptial agreement before marrying. Yes, it is true! Couples who are getting married are now seeking legal advice to protect their assets. The prenuptial agreement can help individuals retain whatever possessions and money when relationship comes to an end.

 

  • If relationship does not go well which might result to a divorce, then you have to speak with a family law lawyer to ensure that your decisions will guided accordingly.

 

  • As stated above, separation or divorce complicates when children are involved. Expect that issue with regards to custody become much complicated and legal experts are capable to ensure your both rights that are upheld.

 

 

  • Property and asset settlement are also complicated issues that need to settle with the guidance of a family lawyer. Couples that are divorce may definitely file for a property settlement –it may cause long disputes then.

 

  • Moreover, there is several financial considerations – variations that may be confusing. A lawyer can guide you and explain well what persons are entitled to and how to fight your rights to get them.

 

  • The grandparents have the rights also to visit their grandchildren. Even couples are breaking up but the rights of a grandparent will not be forgotten. They have the right to seek legal advice if either the parent stopped them from visiting rights.

 

  • Couples that complicating a separation may wish to ask an advice to a legal advisor to discuss their rights making certain that everything will be done properly.

 

  • Live-in or unmarried couples that are wishing to move in together may look for an advice to a legal team especially if one of them has properties or large assets that need to be protected.

 

  • Estate and will planning – when these involve – a legal professional is required to sort this out. Also, if children reach the age of 18 and above should consider including them in a will and testament.

 

  • If victims dwell in an abusive relationship could ask help to lawyers. They must do it to support when they need to get out in a situation. This usually involves women and children, thus as much as possible you must seek it to protect you and your children’s rights.

 

If these situations happen to you and you need assistance, you must automatically speak with the family lawyer today to guide you all throughout.

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review 2017-07-02 21:10
Unfair by Adam Benforado
Unfair: The New Science of Criminal Injustice - Adam Benforado

This is a thought-provoking critique of the American criminal justice system based on psychological research. It is more of an overview than a deep dive: in 286 pages of text (excluding the bibliography), the author discusses everything from snap judgments in investigations, to false confessions and erroneous eyewitness identifications, to the reasons some lawyers behave unethically, to misleading expert testimony, to judicial bias, to the workability of prisons. These are all important issues and the author, a law professor, has many interesting proposals to improve on the problems. Unfortunately, he undermines his message by failing to source his facts, leaving readers with no authority for his arguments; any lawyer should know better.

 

There is a lot of interesting material here: the studies showing how common interrogation techniques, such as offering leniency for a confession, induce students to falsely confess to cheating; the correlation between more stereotypically African features and longer sentences; the tendency of the public to view third parties as biased against their side (Republicans and Democrats both believe the Supreme Court leans to the other side, by approximately equal margins); the way the point-of-view of a camera can affect viewers’ opinion of events (when interrogations are taped, viewers are more likely to see them as coercive when the camera is above the suspect, and as non-coercive when it’s above the officer).

 

The author discusses a number of psychological shortcuts that can lead to ugly results in the justice system: for instance, “narrow bracketing,” in which if your experience is that, say, two-thirds of the claims of a particular type are valid, and you just granted two, you are more inclined to deny the next one to keep the numbers balanced. And there’s a good discussion of how people identify dishonesty: you really can’t tell through body language – at best you can tell someone is nervous, but in a high-pressure situation like a courtroom, this likely has more to do with the person’s comfort in that setting and ability to project confidence than their honesty.

 

The book also discusses the reasons for criminal behavior, which often have less to do with deliberate moral choice than one might imagine. There’s a fascinating story of a man who suddenly becomes obsessed with sex, collecting porn, molesting a young girl, and propositioning everyone – until a tumor is discovered on his brain and removed; then he’s fine until the tumor returns, at which point he starts up all over again. Brain damage may be a less isolated cause of criminality than one might imagine; apparently, while less than 9% of the general population has suffered a traumatic brain injury, around 60% of incarcerated people have. Less dramatically, physical environment also influences one’s actions: wearing a mask makes people more aggressive, while holding a gun biases people to perceive images as more threatening.

 

Rather than simply detailing problems, Benforado does have plenty of suggestions for change. Some of these are relatively small and seem like excellent ideas. For instance, officers should be trained in cognitive interviewing (asking few open-ended and non-suggestive questions) of witnesses of crime to avoid tainting their memories, while witnesses about to view a lineup should be told that the suspect may or may not be included (to prevent their simply choosing the one who looks most like the perpetrator). In fact, having lineups administered by a computer may be even better, to prevent officers’ unconsciously influencing a witness’s memory through their approval or body language.

 

Some of the suggestions are much more global, and I give Benforado credit for thinking big and outside the box. One intriguing idea is virtual trials: record the trial in advance and give jurors just the information, presented through avatars. This would eliminate biases based on physical appearance and performance, and allow a trial to be shown to multiple juries at little additional cost.

 

Meanwhile, the author shows discomfort with many aspects of the adversarial system, though his alternative proposal isn’t quite clear. He correctly points out that the procedural safeguards we build into the system in an attempt to prevent error often become ends in themselves, frustrating their original purpose. Take Miranda warnings for instance: if an officer fails to give them, a perpetrator’s confession can be excluded and therefore a criminal may go free, while on the other hand, judges rarely entertain the idea that a confession might be coerced once an officer has recited those lines – even if we’re talking about a highly suggestible suspect who was questioned for many hours, falsely told that the police had evidence against him, and promised leniency in exchange for a confession. And there’s simply not time, based on the many procedural safeguards built into our system of trials, for more than a tiny percentage of cases to be fully heard; the vast majority plead guilty, in a system the author sees as highly suspect. But what could we do instead? – it’s difficult to decipher Benforado’s ideas on this point, aside from idealistic notions of truth-seeking and vague references to Germany’s having a different system.

 

But the book does have its drawbacks. Rather than endnotes to which one can refer for specific facts and studies, the author simply includes a bibliography for each chapter, with no indication as to which of the dozens of works cited include which information. This shows off the author’s reading while offering no help to his readers. This is particularly unfortunate on the topics for which he provides only vague information: for instance, he tells us that solitary confinement alters the brain in observable ways, but not what part of the brain is affected, what this part does, and what changes are seen once prisoners are freed. Ultimately, the book leaves readers with the choice between taking the author’s word for his claims or doing their own research, starting more or less from scratch. This is an incredibly poor decision for someone who wants to profoundly change entrenched parts of officialdom.

 

Less damaging but also unfortunate is the fact that, while Benforado presents information in a clear and readable style, his storytelling is less than stellar. He begins each chapter with a few pages of introductory fluff, which is a great opportunity to tell compelling human-interest stories related to the topic at hand – but more often than not he squanders it. For instance, the chapter dealing with physiognomy begins with rambling about how people are fascinated by mugshots. Okay.

 

Finally, while the book’s portrayal of the justice system as almost medieval – snap decisions are based incomplete information and the gut feelings of those making them, without scientific basis and generally without oversight – is fairly accurate, in some ways the book does present an overly gloomy picture. I suspect some readers might be unduly horrified, not realizing that most criminal cases aren’t based on eyewitness identification by strangers or police pushing for a confession from whatever black or Hispanic man happened to be near the crime scene. Most people plead guilty because they are, and the evidence against them is good. This in no way excuses the miscarriages of justice that go on every day, but I hope readers don’t come away with the idea that courts and police produce utterly random results.

 

Overall, I’m glad I read this book: much of the information it contains is fascinating, and it’s presented in a clear and concise way. These are issues people should be thinking about. However, the lack of sourcing is a serious limitation; I can only hope it will be corrected in future editions.

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