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review 2017-11-17 19:58
BY THE LIGHT OF THE MOON Review
By the Light of the Moon - Dean Koontz

Jilly and Dylan are strangers who are both knocked unconscious and injected with a strange substance by a scientist they refer to as Doctor Frankenstein. This chance encounter brings the two together, and they (with Dylan’s autistic brother Shep in tow) are off for a high-stakes adventure as they discover the depths of the supernatural powers they have been granted, and just why this happened to them of all people.

 

Look, this book is cheesy as hell. It’s Dean Koontz in full-on goofy mode. The prose is as purple as a corpse in rigor; Jilly and Dylan are pious pissholes who spend most of the book bemoaning the fact that they are so pure, so moralistic, in a world gone to hell. And Jilly is a take-no-crap comedian: the reader is reminded of this on every other page.

 

So why the four stars? Well . . . I had fun. I had a lot of fun. The mystery at the core of this story is one of Koontz’s most intriguing — who is the strange man with the needle, what is it he created, and why does it alter its victims so drastically? The narrative takes place over twenty-four hours, and the pace never lets up. Koontz doesn’t ramble too much here, but when it does it isn’t as much of a chore to read as it is in some of his latter day releases. I didn’t want to put this book down once I’d begun it, if that says anything.

 

This is a Koontz novel. You know what you’re getting. If you’re looking for a bit of brainless, cheesy fun with lots of gun action and wonky science, you could do much worse.

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review 2017-11-14 21:18
The Library of Light and Shadow
The Library of Light and Shadow: A Novel - M. J. Rose

[I received a copy of this book through NetGalley.]

When I requested this novel, I hadn’t realised it was the third instalment in a series; however, it turned out you can read it even without having read the previous ones, since the narrator does summarise well enough what her family is about, and that’s what you mostly need to know as far as background is concerned.

I liked the premise—Delphine’s gift and how it can turn out badly, the family with witchcraft gifts... I also liked how most characters felt like they had a life of their own: they definitely weren’t just plot devices, but had relationships, past experiences (sometimes together, sometimes not), and generally breathed and lived.

A lot of descriptions, too, were vivid, and allowed me to picture the places and scenes quite clearly. I’m definitely not sure about all of the fine details, though (avenue Franklin D. Roosevelt in Paris in 1920... uhm, it was avenue Victor-Emmanuel III, but even without knowing that it doesn’t make sense), so I advise not getting into that with a historian’s mind. Unless those were corrected in the final copy, that is. Anyway, the prose does have its charm, and whether New York, Paris or Southern France in the mid-twentied, it conjures the needed images easily.

I had more trouble with the pacing. For a good half, Delphine doesn’t do that much, to be honest, apart from being depressed because of her gift (which she probably wouldn’t have been if she hadn’t been such a doormat to her brother) and remembering her love story. I don’t know about the format it was told in (a diary), background info was needed here, yet on the other hand, it felt disjointed from the story. Moreover, while in terms of relationships the characters had a life, indeed, their actions and decisions were at times... silly. I could guess the turns and twists, and seriously, Delphine, that vision you had, that made you run away to the other side of the world... it was so obviously opened to many interpretations that it being a misunderstanding was a given here.

The story picked up after the characters arrived at the castle, but at that point I wasn’t ‘in’ it anymore.

Still, I may try the first book, because the parents’ story could be interesting (there’s a duel and a bargain with the spirit of a dead witch, apparently?).

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review 2017-11-10 23:51
Can't wait to read Michelle Obama's memoir.
Chasing Light: Michelle Obama Through th... Chasing Light: Michelle Obama Through the Lens of a White House Photographer - Amanda Lucidon

Since I just finished Pete Souza's newly released book that is a collection of pictures from President Obama's administration it seemed like looking at Lucidon's book on former First Lady Michelle Obama would be a good companion read although they're two very different and separate books.

 

Since the former First Lady obviously had a very different role than her husband the pictures are different but no less enjoyable. I'm not sure I recognized as many of these but all the same it was great to relive the administration through the eyes of the photographer as well as via the pictures who met with and/or interacted with her and her husband. One thing I would have liked that was present in Souza's book was some of the text explanations of some of the well-known photographs he took. There's a little bit of that here but I would have just liked more. :)

 

Again, there's not much else to say. It's a picture-heavy book that would make an excellent display on a coffee table or to have on your book shell. Thankfully it's not as large or as heavy as Souza's book, too! That's definitely a plus. 

 

There isn't really much that's wrong with the book but I rated it 3 stars because I felt there was more that could be done. More photos, more interesting text (unfortunately I didn't feel Lucidon had as many interesting things to say but that's just me). But that said, the book is very nice and perhaps it's a mistake on my part to look at it right after Souza's. I'm also not really into photography/coffee table-style books so that could be a part of it.

 

Borrow from the library or skim it in the bookstore if you're not sure. But it'd probably make a nice gift for the right person, too.

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text 2017-11-01 00:18
Halloween Bingo 2017 - In the Dark Dark Woods
How the Light Gets In - Louise Penny

Managed to sneak in one last bingo square, and what a doozy it was.

 

It looks as though the Arnot story arc has finally come to an end, and there were plenty of loose ends which have been neatly (maybe a little too neatly) tied up.

 

But I'm definitely interested to see where this series is going next.

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