logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: little-a
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-03-06 06:01
You are what you do
A Little Princess - Frances Hodgson Burnett

Gorgeous introspective book. Reading this right after The Secret Garden, it's easy to be amazed and enchanted by Hogson Burnett's ability to transport the reader to that state in childhood where the mundane is made magical with barely a flick of the mind. I reckon that's one of the draws of these books for adults, and part of that lost essence we always try to come back to when reading the beloved volumes of our early years.

 

As for the story itself, it's a bittersweet monument to self-assurance. Sara is a lovely child, spoiled too like our previous leads in the Secret Garden, but of the sweet variety. In a way, her journey is foreshadowed by her wondering whether she's good, and whether she can ever know while the world insists on making her happy. Boy, does the world complot to give her that unstated wish to know.

 

And boy, does she prove herself.

 

I suppose"--to Sara--"that you feel now that you are a princess again."
(...)
"I--TRIED not to be anything else," she answered in a low voice-- "even when I was coldest and hungriest--I tried not to be."

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2017-03-04 00:12
Reading progress update: I've read 120 out of 242 pages.
A Little Princess - Frances Hodgson Burnett

She's shouting to (at, but given the context....) her doll. I can read it straight, and it's a heart-breaking picture of lost innocence and the death of illusions, or I could read between the lines and say she's identifying with the doll and venting some self-hatred, which adds a layer of insight that makes it quite the unexpected bitter pill for a children's book. Hats off.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-02-27 17:17
The Little Paris Bookshop / Nina George
The Little Paris Bookshop: A Novel - Nina George,Simon Pare

Physician heal thyself.

As the book jacket tells us, “Monsieur Perdu calls himself a literary apothecary. From his floating bookstore in a barge on the Seine, he prescribes novels for the hardships of life. Using his intuitive feel for the exact book a reader needs, Perdu mends broken hearts and souls. The only person he can't seem to heal through literature is himself; he's still haunted by heartbreak after his great love disappeared.”

Nina George nails the grief experience in this novel. I freely admit to crying through the final 100 pages, but in a good way. It was like receiving a book prescription from Monsieur Perdu, as when he counsels one woman early in the book: ”And this book, which you will please read slowly, so you can take the occasional break. You’ll do a lot of thinking and probably a bit of crying. For yourself. For the years. But you’ll feel better afterward.”

Indeed, I did feel better afterward. I wish this book had been published back in 1996-1999, when I really could have used it! Instead of shutting my feelings down, just as Jean Perdu has done, I felt exactly the same way: ”He felt as if there were stone tears inside him that left no room for anything else.”

The grief process is so hard and yet so necessary! To carry them within us—that is our task. We carry them all inside us, all our dead and shattered loves, only they make us whole. If we begin to forget or cast aside those we’ve lost, then…then we are no longer present either.

Jean Perdu is certainly well-named. As his surname indicates, he has lost his life and must work through his grief to reclaim it. I loved his note-taking during his grief process for the Encyclopedia of Emotions—taking note of small emotions on his way to processing the big ones. My own reaction to grief was to quit reading, a big mistake in hindsight! How I could have used a Jean Perdu in my own life.

Books are integral to my life and I am so glad to have the joy of reading returned to me.

He wanted her to sense the boundless possibilities offered by books. They would always be enough. The would never stop loving their readers. They were a fixed point in an otherwise unpredictable world. In life. In love. After death.

Like Reblog Comment
review 2017-02-15 00:00
A Million Little Things
A Million Little Things - Susan Mallery 4.5 Stars

A Million Little Things by Susan Mallery

I don’t usually like books A with more than one story-line going on at a time, usually I only like this if the characters are secondary and it doesn’t impact the main story at all. However, Ms Mallery is a deft hand at using this writing device and with this book it was used to a very good advantage. The three women we meet will all take center stage, so we can look at it as if this book is three separate stories -it isn’t though, since all three women are either related or best of friends.

Three separate women -Zoe, Pam, and Jen - an older woman (Pam) and her issues with widowhood, her son, and her daughter; a younger mother (Jen) who must come to terms with her toddler son who won’t speak. Not can’t but won’t. And Zoe who I think of as the main character because we meet her first and who really will have some big problems to iron out, as we will see later in this book.

I loved this book - it is all about very strong women and how they cope with what seems like insurmountable problems, they cope with romance in their lives, sexual issues, altering ones’ outlook on life, relationship issues, child rearing and birth issues as well as many smaller problems along the way.

The self-growth of each of these women and the paths they had to take to realize their true worth, was well worth the time I took to read this novel. This is way more than a romance novel-it is a romance inside of a women’s lit novel and is well worth the ride. Except for one interesting scene late in this book, there is no sex, not even with Zoe and Steven who are having the ‘romance’. This was surprising to me, but in a happy way.

This book was a joy to read - I am not always happy with Ms Mallery’s writing, but this one was wonderful. If there was one issue I had it was a problem I had with Zoe’s character later in the book and the fact that the author seemed to use ‘beating a dead horse’ as a plot device and it did nothing to move the story along.

*ARC supplied by publisher.






Like Reblog Comment
review 2017-02-10 17:43
Sweet Little Lies
Sweet Little Lies: A Heartbreaker Bay Novel (Heartbreaker Bay Series, Book 1) by Jill Shalvis (2016-06-28) - Jill Shalvis

Heartbreaker Bay, Book 1

I Picked Up This Book Because: Jill Shalvis audiobooks are like watching a romantic comedy in your imagination.

The Characters:

Pru (I can’t remember her last name):
Finn O'Reilly:

Co-starring: The whole town? Really there are a lot of characters. I can see this being a long lasting series and that makes me happy.


The Story:

This was a romantic comedy which I really enjoyed. I quite literally laughed out loud more than once. I was kind of sad to see it end.

Karen White does an excellent job as narrator. I wonder how she keeps all of the different character voices straight as she reads.

The Random Thoughts:

“Like beer and tits!” Actual quote.

The Score Card:

description

4 Stars

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?