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review 2018-05-27 10:32
Quantum Ontology: "What is Real - The Unfinished Quest for the Meaning of Quantum Physics" by Adam Becker
What Is Real?: The Unfinished Quest for the Meaning of Quantum Physics - Adam Becker

The Universal-Wave-Function vs. The Pilot-Schrödinger-Wave-Function vs. the Collapsing-Schrödinger-Wave-function as a Stab at Explaining Reality.

 

 

 

The diversity of possible comments on this book reflects ironically the Everett paradigm of quantum ontology. There are as many views of reality as there are observers. Thankfully in all instances, given the depth of some of the possible interpretations, the interaction of the observer state wave and that of the rest of the universe is extremely asymmetrical - the universe has a great effect on the observer but the latter's effect on the universe is mercifully, infinitesimally small. There is no doubt that the philosophical implications of the developments in modern scientific thinking are in lagging mode. This is because of the extreme complexities of the formalisms created to describe the reality as seen by human observers with a certain evolved sense of perception. The modern philosopher has to tread wearily through the theory before emerging tired and almost at wit's end to be in a position to even expound a valid opinion, least of all an emerging new philosophy, on the ontological basis of the quantum world. This is the first time I’ve read a book on Quantum Mechanics wherein three of the major outlier physicists appear: David Bohm, Hugh Everett III, and John Stewart Bell. 

 

 

If you're into the Measurement Problem in Quantum Mechanics, read on.

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review 2018-05-15 22:20
Review: Ray Vs the Meaning of Life
Ray Vs the Meaning of Life - Michael F. Stewart

Ray is a typical teenager just trying to get through high school and find something he enjoys. He spends most of his time playing video games by himself and crushing on a neighbor girl. Then his grandmother dies and everything gets turned upside down. Ray finds himself suddenly responsible for an entire trailer park and all that it entails.

I'm a big fan of coming of age stories and this one does not disappoint. What seventeen year old is ready to discuss the meaning of life? I certainly wasn't. Ray's search for understanding leads him on a hilarious and sometimes disgusting path towards enlightenment. The author does not shy away from the muck that is part of the daily grind of running a camp full of miners and misfits.

I have to say one of my favorite parts of the story was the pool iceberg. The simplest of problems can become overwhelming if we don't manage our expectations of them, including how long it takes for ice to melt once the weather warms up. The symbolism of this and Ray's interactions with Penny really warmed my heart.

There is a lot of depth to this story, family struggles, helping those in need, taking responsibility and of course growing up. Ray's family is an eclectic group of misfits who motivate him, intentionally and not, towards finding his meaning of life. You'll want to join in on this hilarious "spiritual" journey.

I recommend this book to readers who enjoy a fun coming of age story with a lot of heart.

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review 2017-11-14 17:53
Man's Search for Meaning / Viktor E. Frankl
Man's Search for Meaning - Viktor E. Frankl,Harold S. Kushner

Psychiatrist Viktor Frankl's memoir has riveted generations of readers with its descriptions of life in Nazi death camps and its lessons for spiritual survival. Between 1942 and 1945 Frankl labored in four different camps, including Auschwitz, while his parents, brother, and pregnant wife perished. Based on his own experience and the experiences of others he treated later in his practice, Frankl argues that we cannot avoid suffering but we can choose how to cope with it, find meaning in it, and move forward with renewed purpose. Frankl's theory-known as logotherapy, from the Greek word logos ("meaning")-holds that our primary drive in life is not pleasure, as Freud maintained, but the discovery and pursuit of what we personally find meaningful.

 

If there is meaning in life at all, then there must be meaning in suffering.

This seemed like a fitting book to read on the Remembrance Day weekend, especially since I recently read Anne Frank’s Diaries. It is a harrowing reading experience, but also strangely comforting. Frankl details his concentration camp history in order to show us the how and why of survival.

I think it was Frankel’s even-handedness that impressed me the most. He sees evil when it presents itself, in the form of sadistic guards and other prisoners who lord it over their peers, but he also acknowledges the presence of good people in difficult situations—the server in the food line who always scoops from the bottom of the soup pot, giving everyone a chance at one of those longed-for peas, the guard who nudges the weaker prisoner towards lighter duties, the fellow marcher who offers a hand.

Survival is often a matter of luck—choosing the right work assignment or choosing a favourable move to another camp, but each person was also responsible for their own luck by paying attention and helping others when they were able or stroking the ego of a guard when the chance arose. Frankl points out that most of those who survived had a bigger goal—a loved one to be reunited with or a project to be finished. He credits his half-finished book with getting him through a bout of typhus during his imprisonment.

A tale of grim survival, leading to a sympathetic psychiatric theory. Have you identified your purpose?

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review 2017-07-22 01:09
Review of The Meaning of Michelle by Veronica Chambers
The Meaning of Michelle: 16 Writers on the Iconic First Lady and How Her Journey Inspires Our Own - Veronica Chambers

This was a bit disappointing to be honest.  Maybe I was not truly aware of what I would be reading, but most of the essays in this book were written by authors who had either never met Michelle Obama, or had simply been introduced to her.  While the themes of the essay were interesting and socially important in our time, none of them were very deep and many had very little if anything to do with Mrs. Obama.  I am a big fan of the Obamas, and I was hoping for more insight into their lives.

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text 2017-07-16 13:03
Nattiness on page 259
Don't Cry Now - Joy Fielding

Natty....

 

Am I the only one who didn't know this word? I've never heard it before. I thought it rhymes with ratty so it must be bad but that didn't make sense with the context.  Natty makes me think of how my hair looks when I wake up in the morning after I've tossed and turned all night.

 

I asked my son when he passed through and he didn't know either. He looked it up.

 

adjective
informal
adjective: natty; comparative adjective: nattier; superlative adjective: nattiest
  1. (especially of a person or an article of clothing) smart and fashionable.
    "a natty blue blazer and designer jeans"
    synonyms: smartstylishfashionabledapperdebonairdashing, spruced up, well dressedchiceleganttrimMore
     
    antonyms: scruffy

     

    P.s. I have to finish this book quickly.  The third book in the Shetland Island series by Ann Cleeves in coming soon to a mailbox near me. Once it gets here I won't be able to stick to this one.  

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