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review 2017-03-30 19:11
Mississippi Blood (Penn Cage #6) by Greg Iles
Mississippi Blood: A Novel (Natchez Burning) - Greg Iles

Friends, I am winded from the epic sprint that Greg Iles sent me on with this book. I tell you, I was already eagerly awaiting this final installment in Penn Cage's family saga. What I wasn't prepared for though, was how much Iles was going to throw at me all at once. This book is a rapid fire rush to the finish the line. It sweeps you off your feet, and all you can do is hang on for dear life as everything that you've been waiting for unfolds in this maniacally beautiful fashion. This book right here, more than anything else, has proven to me what an expert writer Greg Iles is, and I happily bow down to that expertise.

First off, let me say that I was originally a bit put off by courtroom melodrama that started in Mississippi Blood. Admittedly, I wasn't sure I actually wanted to read a whole murder case laid out on the page. I worried that it would slow things down. That is, of course, until I realized that even these portions of the book were utterly riveting. Watching Shad Johnson and Quentin Avery go at it soon became something that I looked forward to. Iles wrote two brilliant lawyers who, despite any flaws they might have otherwise had, were masters of the judiciary art. I felt like a part of the jury, as surprise witnesses were thrown into the mix and tantalizing details were unearthed. I felt like a part of Penn's family, as I watched them struggle to keep themselves together while dealing with what everyone around them was terming the "case of the century". In other words, I was completely engrossed. I've never run through a 700+ page book more quickly in my whole life. If I could have lived without sleeping for the three days I read this, I would have. I needed to know what happened next.

More than that though, was the fact that Iles didn't let go of a bit of the character development that he'd been nursing throughout this whole series. Despite the trial, and all the violence surrounding it, he didn't stop at all in his quest to make the reader actually care about these characters. I admit, I teared up more than a few times during this book. I hadn't realized how much I actually empathized with Penn and his family until everything was ramping up to a conclusion. It amazed me how quickly I fell in step with even the new characters who were put in place, and how much I wanted them to succeed. It's no secret that I was a little angry after the last book, where Iles took something away from Penn that I really thought was unfair and unnecessary. Reading this installment though, I understood. I saw the reason. It didn't mend the hole in my heart, but I saw Penn in a new a light. A man who has been through hell and back, but still has a heart as big as anything. It's tough not to love a man like that, even when his decisions seem insane.

Look, the point of this rambling review is to fairly confess that I started out this book with a bit of doubt as to whether or not I was going to fully enjoy it. I expected over the top courtroom melodrama, and worried that the climax might not be what I expected it to be. I'm happy to report that I was wrong. I was so very wrong. This book is amazing. Mississippi Blood is not only the ending that Penn Cage deserved, but the type of ending that any author should be damn proud of. My heart is still pounding from what happened, even after the epilogue tried to assuage my fears. This is mastery, plain and simple, and Greg Iles quite rightly has my heart.

Am I sad that there won't be anymore Penn Cage? Yes. Will I happily read anything else that Greg Iles puts out into the world? Absolutely. If you haven't started this series yet, please do. This is a genre that I all but never read, and so you can trust me when I say that this is worth your time. 2,100 pages later, and I'm not even the least bit sorry that I put in the time.

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text 2017-03-30 13:08
RELEASE DAY BLITZ - Aequus (The Royal Protector Academy #2) by Randi Cooley Wilson
Aequus ( A Royal Protector Academy Novel, Book 2) - Randi Cooley Wilson

Serenity is being with the one you love.

Despair is being kept apart.

After the rain comes the war.

 

What if the person you were meant to be with could never be yours? For Serena St. Michael and Tristan Gallagher, this is reality. Tristan has accepted his impending nuptials. He’s returned to his realm and his betrothed. Their unification will create peace. Serena is still struggling with her protector’s choice. With a firm resolve, she will forsake her own future in order to save him. Their love will trigger an ancient war. Can Serena and Tristan rewrite their destinies? Or will the Vergina Sun prophecy be fulfilled, and the lovers fall to fate? Welcome back to the Royal Protector Academy.

 

Aequus is the second novel in the Royal Protector Academy series. This dangerously exciting and darkly romantic tale will take your breath away. It can be read as a stand-alone trilogy, or after the bestselling Revelation series. Intended for mature readers 18+ due to language, mild violence, and sexual situations.

 

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Source: archaeolibrarianologist.blogspot.de/2017/03/release-day-blitz-aequus-royal.html
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text 2017-03-30 05:57
March wrap - up 2017
Checkmate: This is War - Kennedy Fox
This is Love - Kennedy Fox
Where I Belong - J. Daniels
The Art of Being Normal: A Novel - Lisa Williamson
It Ends with Us: A Novel - Colleen Hoover
History Is All You Left Me - Adam Silvera
Checkmate: This is Reckless - Kennedy Fox
The Wild Side - R.K. Lilley
Strong Signal - Megan Erickson,Santino Hassell

9  books  

3  physical books

3  audio books

6  ebooks  

 

awesome  reading  month   :D 

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review 2017-03-29 21:44
My Name is Lucy Barton / Elizabeth Strout
My Name Is Lucy Barton: A Novel - Elizabeth Strout

Lucy Barton is recovering slowly from what should have been a simple operation. Her mother, to whom she hasn't spoken for many years, comes to see her. Gentle gossip about people from Lucy's childhood in Amgash, Illinois, seems to reconnect them, but just below the surface lies the tension and longing that have informed every aspect of Lucy's life: her escape from her troubled family, her desire to become a writer, her marriage, her love for her two daughters.

 

Wow, this little book went by quickly! But it deals with deep issues, the stuff that nobody likes to talk about, especially if you’re directly involved. As Lucy and her mother are.

Despite what Lucy tells us about writing—that one should plunge right in and confront the main issues—that’s not how this book is structured. It’s all about reading between the lines, intuiting what’s going on, and piecing together the bits & pieces that Lucy deigns to throw to us, the readers. She tosses out tidbits of information, all from her own point of view and we have no other voices to give us some balance. Only what she reports that her mother or her siblings or her husband said.

A flighty and somewhat untrustworthy narrator, our Lucy, and yet I felt compelled to sift through the fragments to try to figure out exactly what happened in that family home to make her into the uncomfortable person that she currently is. Was it just poverty? Or what else was happening?

If you enjoyed this novel, you might also like The Bean Trees by Barbara Kingsolver. Both examine women’s attempts to escape impoverished backgrounds (and incidentally, I've read both for my real-life book club).

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review 2017-03-29 18:09
Not Quite as Good as Volume 1
The Sandman, Vol. 3: Dream Country - Neil Gaiman,Malcolm Jones III,Kelley Jones,Colleen Doran

I did like this, but thought that it was a bit all over the place. I only really liked one issue and that was the one dealing with Death and the woman who was not a woman, Rainie. There seemed to be no connection between these issues and I thought that the issue ending on scripts of whatever for this volume was boring. I just skipped all over that. 

 

"Calliope" was a great story and we find out more about this Muse and her relationship with Dream. I liked the idea of Dream having a son though what was being done to Calliope all in the name of writing was terrible. I think that the authors in that one got off way too easily. This story starts before Dream is imprisoned and then escapes. 

 

"A Dream of a Thousand Cats" I think my cat would enjoy this story. I did like how we get to see Dream as a cat though. Still creeped me out with the all knowing look in his eyes. 

 

"A Midsummer Night's Dream" Well this turned sinister as hell in a quick shake. We have seen the relationship between Dream and Shakespeare in volume 1 so I am going to assume he keeps showing up. It was an interesting idea that I will admit to being slightly bored a bit.

 

"Facade" so I had to look up the character of Rainie since I had no idea who the heck she was and what her deal was either. She's interesting, but what was really interesting to me is that she is thousands of years old and she really wants to die. She's sick of merely existing and having no true face anymore. I did laugh though when she goes to lunch with an old friend and her fake face mask falls into a plate of spaghetti. Rainie ends up meeting Death who talks to her about the end of all things which was actually moving. Great ending to this issue. 

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