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quote 2018-04-19 14:01
Facebook was not originally created to be a company. It was built to accomplish a social mission to make the world more open and connected.
Mark Zuckerberg (People in the News) - Mary E. Williams

A website and also my book. I picked this quote because it was the only one I could find but I still feel it is a very good quote. I also picked out this one because ive heard it before and I really like how it talks about keeping the world connected.

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video 2018-04-07 00:30
The Sleeping Prince - Melinda Salisbury
Rebel of the Sands - Alwyn Hamilton
The Hidden People - Alison Littlewood
The Scarecrow Queen - Melinda Salisbury
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review 2018-04-05 13:22
Other People's Houses - Abbi Waxman Other People's Houses - Abbi Waxman

Other People’s Houses is such a realistic story. Maybe not all the storylines would be happening at the same time, but it is the idea that closed doors every family has their own world happening. As the neighbors look on, there are things that should be kept private yet in a neighborhood where everyone knows everyone it is close to impossible. Many times the happenings behind closed doors become more drama than they have to be just because of other’s opinions, “help”, or just plain nosiness. Frances was the know all in her neighborhood. Probably due to the fact that she was the stay at home mom that everyone turned to when they needed help. She was given an inside look, through the kids especially, behind the walls of her neighbors. She tried to help everyone, she had her nose in everyone’s household, but she was not the gossip. She knew what was happening, she was willing to help, and she didn’t spread their gossip around. The other characters all tell their story but Frances is the main narrator. I liked being able to hear firsthand what has happening in their lives and getting an inside look at their lives. Some of the problems were heavy, some were not so heavy, but all were realistic to the real lives in US. I laughed, I blushed, and I felt compassion for most of the characters. I am recommending this book to anyone who enjoys getting an inside look at the lives of others.

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text 2018-04-02 02:55
Library Books, Updated
The Alley of Love and Yellow Jasmines - Shohreh Aghdashloo
The Boat People - Sharon Bala
Northwest Garden Manifesto: Create, Restore, and Maintain a Sustainable Yard - John Albers,David F. Perry
Gods, Monsters, and the Lucky Peach - Kelly Robson
Six Wakes - Mur Lafferty
New York 2140 - Kim Stanley Robinson
Crash Override: How Gamergate (Nearly) Destroyed My Life, and How We Can Win the Fight Against Online Hate - Zoe Quinn
My Favorite Thing Is Monsters - Emil Ferris
Akata Witch - Nnedi Okorafor
In Other Lands - Sarah Rees Brennan,Carolyn Nowak

Checked Out

The Alley of Love and Yellow Jasmines - Shohreh Aghdashloo (DUE 04-13-18)

The Boat People - Sharon Bala  (DUE 04-27-18)

Northwest Garden Manifesto: Create, Restore, and Maintain a Sustainable Yard - John Albers, David F. Perry (DUE 05-04-18)

Gods, Monsters, and the Lucky Peach - Kelly Robson  (DUE 05-10-18)

 

On Hold

New York 2140 - Kim Stanley Robinson   (In Transit)

Six Wakes - Mur Lafferty   (1 of 1 holds)

Crash Override: How Gamergate (Nearly) Destroyed My Life, and How We Can Win the Fight Against Online Hate - Zoe Quinn  (1 of 1 holds)

Akata Witch - Nnedi Okorafor  (1 of 1 holds) 

In Other Lands - Sarah Rees Brennan,Carolyn Nowak  (1 of 1 holds)

My Favorite Thing Is Monsters - Emil Ferris   (2 of 2 holds)

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review 2018-03-28 16:22
An outstanding survey of 18th century England
A Polite And Commercial People: England 1727 1783 - Paul Langford

In 1934, Oxford University Press published the first volume in the “Oxford History of England” series.  As subsequent volumes came out over the next 31 years, they came to serve as indispensable surveys of English history, the natural starting point for anyone interested in England’s past and a powerful force influencing our understanding of it.  Yet as the state of historical scholarship evolved, gradually the volumes became outdated in terms of their presentation and interpretation of the past.  In response, Oxford launched a “New Oxford History of England” series, of which Paul Langford’s book was the inaugural title.

 

In it Langford presents a wide-ranging history of England from the accession of George II to the loss of the American colonies.  He presents the era as a chaotic one, with the country still coping with the consequences of the Glorious Revolution, which let a deep impression upon politics and society.  Though the aristocracy remained the dominant group in many respects, the author sees the middle class increasingly coming to play a vital role in English life as the century progressed.  In an age of commercial prosperity, their”polite” values increasingly contested with those of the upper class, setting the stage for their gradual assertion as the dominant segment of society in the century that followed.

 

Langford’s book is an outstanding survey of Hanoverian England, one that draws upon an impressive range of scholarship.  Though his main focus is on the politics and society of the period, very little escapes his coverage, as economics, art, and literature also are addressed within its pages. Though he presumes that his readers possess some prior knowledge of his subject (the mini biographies of people offered in footnotes in the old series are absent here), his analysis and arguments are clear and forcefully made.  The understanding he provides of the era makes his book a critical resource on the subject, and a worthy successor volume to those from the venerable old series.

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