logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: spring
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-08-14 06:10
The Spring Cleaning Murders, An Ellie Haskell Mystery by Dorothy Cannell
The Spring Cleaning Murders - Dorothy Cannell

The Spring Cleaning Murders, An Ellie Haskell Mystery by Dorothy Cannell is a quick cozy mystery to read. Because it kept me guessing, I gave it four stars.

 

Ellie's family meets a new housekeeper, Mrs. Large. "'Morning, all.' Her voice was deep and gruff and--as might be expected--she was definitely a big woman. A good six-feet tall, with a long lugubrious face and a plodding walk."

 

Ellie is thinking about the loved ones in her life: "the heart has many nooks and crannies, each of which can only be filled by certain people."

 

I received a complimentary Kindle copy from Random House Publishing Group-Alibi and NetGalley. That did not change my opinion for this review.

 

Link to purchase: https://www.amazon.com/Spring-Cleaning-Murders-Haskell-Mystery-ebook/dp/B01KE61LTI

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-08-09 14:50
Review of American Spring by Walter Borneman
American Spring: Lexington, Concord, and the Road to Revolution - Walter R. Borneman

A solid retelling of the six months that started the Revolutionary War.  I have read quite a bit about this period, and I did not find anything really new here.  The author acknowledges that he wrote this to bring a popular history to the general public, and I think he did a nice job telling the story.  It had been a while since I read about Lexington, Concord, and Bunker Hill and all the events surrounding them, so I enjoyed taking a mental walk through the time period.

Like Reblog Comment
review 2017-07-27 17:15
Helliconian Spring - Brian W. Aldiss

The central character in this book is the planet Helliconia. The story shows how the primitive civilizations and flora and fauna are influenced by planetary forces with seasons that last thousands of years. Readers must keep in mind that this book is the start of a trilogy or they will not like the ending.

All in all it is a good start and makes me want to read the next book in the trilogy.

Like Reblog Comment
review 2017-07-05 11:00
A Suffocating Village: Death in Spring by Mercè Rodoreda
Death in Spring - Mercè Rodoreda,Martha Tennent

Less than a year ago I reviewed a novel by Catalan author Mercè Rodoreda (1908-1983) who is much celebrated in her country but virtually unknown elsewhere. I was so impressed by the book that I felt like reading also others of her works and from the two novels published posthumously, both of them unfinished, I eventually picked the one available in English translation, namely Death in Spring or in the original Catalan La mort i la primavera, i.e. Death and Spring. At first the title seems a bit strange, if not contradictory because it links death with nature’s rebirth after winter, but given that the novel flows over with powerful as well as poetical symbols and metaphors of life and death it’s quite appropriate. It’s a complex and well-constructed story about society that reminds me a lot of the works of Franz Kafka although it’s different in style.

 

The nameless I-narrator and protagonist makes his first appearance as a fourteen-year-old boy who enters the river passing under his mountain village built generations earlier on the debris of a huge rock-slip. He inhales the beauty of nature surrounding him and realises that he is “being followed by a bee, as well as by the stench of manure and the honey scent of blooming wisteria” representing the village with its pink houses that is always on his mind. As it turns out people there have many rituals to keep misfortune at bay. On the other side of the river is the forest of the dead with a tree dedicated to every inhabitant living or already dead with a plaque and a ring. During funerals all children are locked away into the stifling wooden kitchen cupboards, a custom that clearly mirrors the cruel death ritual practiced by the villagers for generations that requires to force pink cement down the throats of the dying in order to keep their souls from escaping and turning into shadows creeping “among the shrubs, always threatening to attack the village”. At the same time, and less obviously, it reflects the oppressive atmosphere in the village where everybody has to follow strict rules and not even the children are allowed to breathe freely in the literal as well as in the figurative sense. For being a boy the narrator doesn’t understand why the man whom he watches from behind a shrub hollows out a tree and enters it to die. As it turns out the man is his father, but instead of showing himself and talking to him, the boy returns to the village and tells the blacksmith. Everybody rushes out to give the already half-dead father the necessary cement treatment. With his teenage stepmother whom everybody considers retarded and strange he roams the village and its surroundings by night taking fun in vandalising the forest of the dead and using the pink powder of the cave to find out where its waters flow – thus defying the old village rituals that don’t make sense to them. Before long their adolescent urges take over and they have a daughter, but the community doesn’t accept them neither as individuals nor as a family because they are just too different, too free, too alive…

 

Many reviewers argue that Death in Spring represents life during the Spanish Civil War and in the rigid regime of General Franco that followed and that forced the author into exile, but in my opinion this is too limited an interpretation. I think that the author more generally portrayed the workings of human society where conservative forces use to be the stronger ones except in times of deepest discontent and misery. Even in our modern western civilisation that holds individual freedom in such high esteem, those who aren’t like all others or behave in a different, maybe even revolutionary way are marginalised, excluded and eventually crushed, i.e. driven to suicide or madness like in the novel although more subtly than in a totalitarian regime. In a nutshell: this is another great work of literature that would deserve much more attention. Highly recommended!

 

Death in Spring - Mercè Rodoreda,Martha Tennent 

 

»»» read also my review of In Diamond Square by Mercè Rodoreda.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-07-01 22:26
[REVIEW] Devil in Spring by Lisa Kleypas
Devil in Spring - Lisa Kleypas

What a sweet, fluffy read that went into wtf territory as soon as we hit the 75% mark. 

Is there a need for Ms. Kleypas to add a terrorist conspiracy near the end of the book? because it made no sense to me and it seemed tacked on.

(spoiler show)


First things first, Gabriel (the hero) is not a rake, so I have no idea why it says in the blurb that he is. That threw me off completely. He's a good enough hero, but he is easily overshadowed by his father, who appears many times in this book. Pandora (the heroine) is annoying but still, manages to be endearing at times. As a couple, they are just fine. Nothing out of the ordinary or memorable but fluffy enough to make me sigh in happiness a few times. I did love how patient he was with her (because believe you me, she can test anyone's patience) and how he tried to help her overcome difficulties with his support. Their relationship really felt like a partnership and I appreciated that.

Beware, the insta-lust/love is strong on this one. Blink, and you'll miss when the hero suddenly had to possess her with all his might.

The dialogue was fast-paced and smart, the easy humor is there. I kept giggling out loud at some lines.

Assuming the next book in the series is between Ethan and Garrett, I'm calling it now: Ethan is a Ravenel, probably Pandora's mother's love child.

(spoiler show)
More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?