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text 2017-09-24 06:08
Reading progress update: I've read 102 out of 316 pages.
The Tokyo Zodiac Murders (Pushkin Vertigo) - Shika MacKenzie,Soji Shimada,Ross MacKenzie

M'kay, I was drinking a cup of tea and thinking about this book and the ending of Death Note: Another Note and Agatha Christie's And Then There Were None, and an explanation popped into my head for the varying depths at which the young women were buried. More specifically, an explanation for

the way one girl in particular was found

(spoiler show)

. If I'm right, 1) whoa, weird mystery novel logic is finally seeping into my brain and 2) I hope Shimada has a good explanation for why the character did that.

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text 2017-09-24 04:58
Reading progress update: I've read 102 out of 316 pages.
The Tokyo Zodiac Murders (Pushkin Vertigo) - Shika MacKenzie,Soji Shimada,Ross MacKenzie

"I won't be able to solve it in one day. It'll take me several days at least."

 

Lol. Such an ego.

 

I have a theory, but I haven't been able to come up with a way around the alibis (and a bunch of other details), so it's really more of a hunch. I'm usually wrong when it comes to these sorts of mysteries, though.

 

At the moment I'm thinking that, at the very least,

Heikichi's daughters and maybe his wife were involved in his death (motive: maybe that apartment complex several of his family members wanted to have built?), and Heitaro and Yasue were involved in both Kazue and the other girls' murders (motive: revenge for Heikichi's death?). There had to be more than one person involved in the Azoth murders - that's a lot of bodies to cut up, cart around, and bury.

(spoiler show)
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text 2017-09-23 20:13
Reading progress update: I've read 60 out of 316 pages.
The Tokyo Zodiac Murders (Pushkin Vertigo) - Shika MacKenzie,Soji Shimada,Ross MacKenzie

This is really good so far. It's a relief to read a Japanese novel with such a smooth-feeling translation.

 

The first 38 pages were very casually disturbing. "Of course, the six young women will have to die. ... If only they could know why they must die, I am sure they would be satisfied with their fate." (20) The "six young women" being his daughters and nieces.

 

Now it's 40 years later and the case is a curiosity, something for mystery aficionados to ponder. One character is laying out the details for another, and the stuff about Heikichi (the guy who decided to kill his daughters and nieces) and his murder is interesting all on its own. I'm looking forward to seeing the rest of it laid out.

 

Something about the style makes me think of The Decagon House Murders, but that's by a completely different author and translator.

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text 2017-09-23 01:08
Reading progress update: I've read 176 out of 176 pages.
Death Note: Another Note - NisiOisiN

On the one hand, bravo to the author for tricking me so well. On the other hand, eh, I'm easily tricked, and the author's methods annoy me. That was one of the most aggravating "here's what actually happened and what the killer's plans were" I've read in a long time. And breathtakingly stupid on the killer's part. Was there no better way to beat L than

dousing himself in gasoline and lighting himself on fire

(spoiler show)

?

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text 2017-09-22 16:54
Reading progress update: I've read 134 out of 176 pages.
Death Note: Another Note - NisiOisiN

More odd names, as Misora and Ryuzaki try to figure out whether the killer's fourth victim is going to be a woman named Blackberry Brown or a man in the same building named Blues-harp Babysplit.

 

This whole book makes me think of one of those adventure games where you solve really weird puzzles by doing things like combining a rock, a doll, a coat hanger, and some duct tape in order to figure out that there's an important clue on a particular spot on the floorboards (not actually an example from the book, although they did just somehow figure out that the killer

turned an entire room into a picture of a clock, with the victim as the clock hands

(spoiler show)

). I take issue with the way Misora and Ryuzaki decided on the date when the next murder would occur.

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