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review 2017-05-24 07:14
Make Your Own Lunch by Ryan Porter
Make Your Own Lunch: How to Live an Epically Epic Life Through Work, Travel, Wonder, and (Maybe) College - Ryan Porter

This is one of those books you give to high school students or beginning college students.  The author provides motivational stories on making your own decisions about what you want to do with your life aka "make your own lunch".  The book is amusing and well written.  It's not a bad book, but I wonder how realistic some of the advice is.

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text 2017-05-23 20:44
What's on your Library Wishlist?
Oathblood - Mercedes Lackey
Twenties Girl - Sophie Kinsella
Bitten by the Vampire - Bonnie Vanak
Bound by Night (Bound #1) - Amanda Ashley
Shadowfever - Karen Marie Moning
The Red Pyramid - Rick Riordan
King Raven: 3-In-1 of Hood, Scarlet, and Tuck - Stephen R. Lawhead
Unleashed - Nancy Holder,Debbie Viguié
King of Darkness - Elisabeth Staab
Angel Burn (Angel Trilogy, #1) - L.A. Weatherly

I need to update booklikes shelves for the ebooks I've wishlisted at my public library (uses overdrive) before it grows completely out of control.

 

I'll be spacing out some posts for my wishlist from oldest to newest in the process.

 

Some are available now but not fitting my mood (or needing more research because not sure if read).

 

(Last books on page 17 of  my wishlist)

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text 2017-05-22 22:26
What's On Your Waitlist? (On Hold at Library)

So, what's on your waitlist to read next from your public library?  

 

Thought it might be fun to share posts about it (and a reminder to update my shelves to reflect).

 

I have these ebooks on hold:

 

League of Dragons: A Novel of Temeraire - Naomi Novik Behind the Throne - K. B. Wagers  Mug Shot: A Java Jive Mystery - Caroline Fardig  

#1 on 1 copy.              #3 on 1 copy.           #1 on 1 copy.

 

Witches of Bourbon Street - Deanna Chase  Etched in Bone - Anne Bishop  A Court of Thorns and Roses - Sarah J. Maas  

 6 on 1 copy.                  6 on 1 copy.         16 on 4 copies.

 

Red Queen - Victoria Aveyard  Scarlet - Marissa Meyer  The Fifth Season - N.K. Jemisin  

6 on 5 copies.              1 on 2 copies.            3 on 1 copy.

 

The Fate of the Tearling: A Novel (The Queen of the Tearling Book 3) - Erika Johansen 

4 on 1 copy.

 

(just in order shown on my library's website which allows a maximum checkout period of 21 days and uses overdrive)

 

 

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review 2017-05-22 15:41
Await Your Reply, by Dan Chaon
Await Your Reply - Dan Chaon

Await Your Reply is ultimately a tragic story featuring characters who are lost or mentally ill and either want a new start or can't let go of the past. However, I found it hard to sympathize with the three characters whose perspectives the novel shifts between in alternating chapters. As a result I rushed through my reading mostly to finish the book and see how these seemingly unconnected characters were, in fact, connected. It's a story of identity, how it is mutable but perhaps can become its own trap, even when that identity is traded in for a new one.

 

I'm surprised I purchased this book since it features one of my greatest squicks (as we say in fandom): a teacher-student romantic relationship. The recently graduated student, Lucy, is one of the characters whose point of view is narrated. Though she's lost her parents, at first it seems this is not a great loss to her. She also disparages her older, less ambitious sister. This made Lucy and her rash decision to run off with her AP History teacher unsympathetic for me. She's bright academically, but stupid and naive when it comes to everything else. She almost immediately begins to feel uneasy about the promises her older boyfriend made once they arrive at their temporary destination, but she sticks around.

 

Similarly, Ryan, a college student, leaves school and his family behind once he learns the truth about his parentage. He hadn't been doing well in school and wasted the money meant for tuition. He takes off with a guy he's just met and becomes involved in illegal money-moving and identity fraud schemes, though he barely understands what he's doing and why. He doesn't seem that troubled knowing that his family is looking for him. So, he's another character I found I couldn't care about.

 

The third character, Miles, I found the most sympathetic. He's been on the trail of his schizophrenic twin brother, Hayden, ever since the latter disappeared years before. Miles disrupts his own life (or barely develops one) to chase his twin and feeds on occasional communications from him. He gives Hayden the benefit of the doubt, despite the warnings of others and evidence to the contrary. Is he big-hearted or a fool?

 

I won't spoil how the three characters' stories connect, but despite some surprises, the mystery of that connection wasn't enough for me to overcome my issues with the characters.

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review 2017-05-21 20:55
Nor Any Country by Garth St. Omer
Nor Any Country - Garth St Omer

This novella is only 96 pages long, plus a laudatory 20-page essay about the work by one Jeremy Poynting. (I was puzzled by how a work no one had a word to say about on Goodreads could have the sort of academic following implied by this essay, until a Google search revealed that Poynting is its publisher.) The book follows its protagonist, Peter, as he returns to his unnamed island home (presumed by the publisher to be St. Omer’s home country of St. Lucia) for a brief visit after many years of study abroad.

Unfortunately, where Mr. Poynting saw subtle brilliance, the novella seemed to me mostly a mundane catalogue of Peter’s wandering about the island conversing with various people; his role in the conversations consists largely of creating a sense of his own superiority by saying little and smiling often. While visiting, he must decide what to do about the wife with whom he had no communication during his years abroad, but the narrative does little to show us how he arrives at his choice. Mostly Peter, while traveling about the island, simply ruminates on his European ex-girlfriends. There’s precious little narrative momentum in any of this, and little to interest the reader in the protagonist. Some of the supporting characters seem more interesting, but have limited room to breathe in such a short work.

As for the writing itself, it is adequate but sometimes lacking in clarity; numerous times I had to re-read passages to figure out what the author was trying to say. Written in the 1960s, the book seems to assume cultural understanding that a modern, non-Caribbean reader is unlikely to have: while racial politics are quite important in this setting, readers are left to deduce the race of almost all of the characters on their own (and I’m still not sure about Daphne).

All that said, this is a very short book that will leave readers somewhat more informed about the issues facing a society in a particular time and place. While the lack of clarity sometimes slows down the reading, large amounts of dialogue should keep readers from getting too bogged down.

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