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The Good Lord Bird - Community Reviews back

by James McBride
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In Dreams Awake
In Dreams Awake rated it 3 years ago
James McBride's novel has been described as a modern day Mark Twain, but I would say he accomplished more than Twain by taking on both the heavy subjects of treatment of blacks as well as treatment of women. It's a perfect blend of history, humor, adventure, and tenderness. Reading it was like peeli...
LAUREN B. DAVIS
LAUREN B. DAVIS rated it 3 years ago
I loved James McBride's THE COLOR OF WATER, his memoir in which he explored his multi-racial roots and channeled the voice of his Jewish mother. I recommend it highly. It was inventive, moving and well-written. So I expected a lot from this novel, especially since it won the National Book Award in...
Thewanderingjew
Thewanderingjew rated it 4 years ago
This is really an odd, but creative, little story. I would be lying if I said I understood all of it. This is the story of Henry Shackleford and how he came to be acquainted with John Brown, the abolitionist. It is narrated by Henry, who spent several years dressed as a female, with a different iden...
ijanderson1
ijanderson1 rated it 4 years ago
Written by: James McBride, Copyrighted in 2013 Published By: Riverhead Books, (Hardback) “I was born a colored man and don’t you forget it. But I lived as a colored woman for seventeen years.” The Good Lord Bird is written in three parts Free Deeds (Kansas), Slave Deeds (Missouri), and Legen...
The Five-Eyed Bookworm
The Five-Eyed Bookworm rated it 4 years ago
FIRST BOOK FOR 2014 Date Started: January 2, 2014 | Date Finished: January 7, 2014 First lines: I was born a colored man and don't you forget it. But I lived as a colored woman for seventeen years. Winner of the 2013 National Book Award for Fiction | A Washington Post, Publishers Weekly, Opra...
aka Grasshopper
aka Grasshopper rated it 4 years ago
If Mark Twain and Mel Brooks had ever collaborated, they would have invented a comic character like Henry(etta) Shackleford, a light-skinned slave boy who is freed by the American Abolitionist John Brown and who passes as a girl for most of The Good Lord Bird. It is lucky for us that James McBride t...
JeffreyKeeten
JeffreyKeeten rated it 4 years ago
****NATIONAL BOOK AWARD WINNER****“The old face, crinkled and dented with canals running every which way, pushed and shoved up against itself for a while, till a big old smile busted out from beneath 'em all, and his grey eyes fairly glowed. It was the first time I ever saw him smile free. A true sm...
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