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The Paradox of Choice - Barry Schwartz
The Paradox of Choice
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Whether we're buying a pair of jeans, ordering a cup of coffee, selecting a long-distance carrier, applying to college, choosing a doctor, or setting up a 401(k), everyday decisions -- both big and small -- have become increasingly complex due to the overwhelming abundance of choice with which we... show more
Whether we're buying a pair of jeans, ordering a cup of coffee, selecting a long-distance carrier, applying to college, choosing a doctor, or setting up a 401(k), everyday decisions -- both big and small -- have become increasingly complex due to the overwhelming abundance of choice with which we are presented.As Americans, we assume that more choice means better options and greater satisfaction. But beware of excessive choice: choice overload can make you question the decisions you make before you even make them, it can set you up for unrealistically high expectations, and it can make you blame yourself for any and all failures. In the long run, this can lead to decision-making paralysis, anxiety, and perpetual stress. And, in a culture that tells us that there is no excuse for falling short of perfection when your options are limitless, too much choice can lead to clinical depression.In The Paradox of Choice, Barry Schwartz explains at what point choice -- the hallmark of individual freedom and self-determination that we so cherish -- becomes detrimental to our psychological and emotional well-being. In accessible, engaging, and anecdotal prose, Schwartz shows how the dramatic explosion in choice -- from the mundane to the profound challenges of balancing career, family, and individual needs -- has paradoxically become a problem instead of a solution. Schwartz also shows how our obsession with choice encourages us to seek that which makes us feel worse.By synthesizing current research in the social sciences, Schwartz makes the counter intuitive case that eliminating choices can greatly reduce the stress, anxiety, and busyness of our lives. He offers eleven practicalsteps on how to limit choices to a manageable number, have the discipline to focus on those that are important and ignore the rest, and ultimately derive greater satisfaction from the choices you have to make.
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Format: ebook
ISBN: 9780061748998 (0061748994)
Publisher: HarperCollins
Pages no: 304
Edition language: English
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Community Reviews
Ecletic Reader
Ecletic Reader rated it
2.0 The Paradox of Choice: Why More Is Less
The thesis of the book is a solid one that I can understand. The psychological mechanisms of adaptation and some of the heuristics were familiar because of prior psychological education. However, I was unimpressed with the scientific discussions in the book. A number of studies are referenced, th...
oh the guilt
oh the guilt rated it
0.0 The Paradox of Choice: Why More Is Less
Ok, so I'm not sure if I read this book or just a paper by Mr. Schwartz of the same subject.Doesn't matter either way, as long as you grasp the concept which is that being a maximizer in everything (or most things in your life) is no way to maximize your happiness (though I personally find contentme...
Gypsy Librarian on Books
Gypsy Librarian on Books rated it
1.0 The Paradox of Choice: Why More Is Less
This is one of those books that, if you read the introduction, you pretty much know what the rest of the book is about. As I wrote in my personal blog for this book, "anyhow, once you read the prologue, the author gives such a clear road map that the incentive to read the rest of the book is minimal...
Osho
Osho rated it
Schwartz, with whom I had a pleasant chat at American Psychological Association a while back, contends that while having choices is valuable, more choices don't appear to lead to greater happiness, and may be psychologically detrimental. I enjoyed his arguments, which are closely associated with soc...
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