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The Swerve: How the World Became Modern - Stephen Greenblatt
The Swerve: How the World Became Modern
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4.00 140
Winner of the 2012 Pulitzer Prize for Non-Fiction Winner of the 2011 National Book Award for Non-FictionOne of the world's most celebrated scholars, Stephen Greenblatt has crafted both an innovative work of history and a thrilling story of discovery, in which one manuscript, plucked from a... show more
Winner of the 2012 Pulitzer Prize for Non-Fiction Winner of the 2011 National Book Award for Non-FictionOne of the world's most celebrated scholars, Stephen Greenblatt has crafted both an innovative work of history and a thrilling story of discovery, in which one manuscript, plucked from a thousand years of neglect, changed the course of human thought and made possible the world as we know it. Nearly six hundred years ago, a short, genial, cannily alert man in his late thirties took a very old manuscript off a library shelf, saw with excitement what he had discovered, and ordered that it be copied. That book was the last surviving manuscript of an ancient Roman philosophical epic, On the Nature of Things, by Lucretius—a beautiful poem of the most dangerous ideas: that the universe functioned without the aid of gods, that religious fear was damaging to human life, and that matter was made up of very small particles in eternal motion, colliding and swerving in new directions. The copying and translation of this ancient book-the greatest discovery of the greatest book-hunter of his age-fueled the Renaissance, inspiring artists such as Botticelli and thinkers such as Giordano Bruno; shaped the thought of Galileo and Freud, Darwin and Einstein; and had a revolutionary influence on writers such as Montaigne and Shakespeare and even Thomas Jefferson. 16 pages full-color illustrations
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Format: hardcover
ISBN: 9780393064476 (0393064476)
ASIN: 0393064476
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
Pages no: 356
Edition language: English
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Community Reviews
KatieMc
KatieMc rated it
4.0 The Swerve: How the World Became Modern
I am blown away. Not so much by Poggio and his book hunting bounty, although that was interesting and gives me an appreciation for what does remain of ancient texts. I now take great pleasure in calling myself an Epicurean, which has greater meaning than just atheism, and sounds much nicer too.
so many books, so little time
so many books, so little time rated it
4.0 The Swerve: How the World Became Modern
I suppose "On the Nature of Things: One of the Ways the World Became Modern" doesn't have quite the same ring as a title. That aside, this is a wonderfully written and stimulating look at the rediscovery of an ancient text that rhymed beautifully with the humanist currents of the Renaissance and lat...
KCPolski
KCPolski rated it
3.0 The Swerve: How the World Became Modern
I thought this book was going to be about how De Rerum Natura influenced the Renaissance, but that part of the story was mostly confined to the last two chapters. The book focused more on the climate in which Poggio found himself when he came across the manuscript, and aspects of his career that was...
audreyhawkins
audreyhawkins rated it
This was a fascinating read if you want to know more about how ancient texts were lost and found and the history of ideas. And if you are a big fan of the Renaissance, you've hit the jackpot. Me? I was looking for a bit more about Lucretius. What can I say? I love me some Lucretius.
Bettie's Books
Bettie's Books rated it
0.0
Publication Date: September 4, 2012 | ISBN-10: 0393343405 | ISBN-13: 978-0393343403 | Edition: 1Winner of the 2012 Pulitzer Prize for Non-Fiction Winner of the 2011 National Book Award for Non-FictionOne of the world's most celebrated scholars, Stephen Greenblatt has crafted both an innovative work ...
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