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Tyler Cowen
Tyler Cowen (/ˈkaʊ.ən/; born January 21, 1962) is an American economist, academic, and writer. He occupies the Holbert C. Harris Chair of economics, as a professor at George Mason University, and is co-author, with Alex Tabarrok, of the popular economics blog Marginal Revolution. Cowen and... show more



Tyler Cowen (/ˈkaʊ.ən/; born January 21, 1962) is an American economist, academic, and writer. He occupies the Holbert C. Harris Chair of economics, as a professor at George Mason University, and is co-author, with Alex Tabarrok, of the popular economics blog Marginal Revolution. Cowen and Tabarrok have also ventured into online education by starting Marginal Revolution University. He currently writes the "Economic Scene" column for the New York Times. He also writes for such publications as The New Republic, the Wall Street Journal, Forbes, Newsweek, and the Wilson Quarterly. Cowen also serves as general director of George Mason's Mercatus Center, a university research center that focuses on the market economy. In February 2011, Cowen received a nomination as one of the most influential economists in the last decade in a survey by The Economist. He was ranked #72 among the "Top 100 Global Thinkers" in 2011 by Foreign Policy Magazine "for finding markets in everything."Bio from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

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Birth date: January 21, 1962
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Community Reviews
Defenestraethe
Defenestraethe rated it 6 years ago
I heard the chap on NPR this morning talking as if "income inequality" were some sort of physical law utterly unrelated to social policy. I'd call him an idiot, but I think it's clear that he's pushing a particular flavor of economic theory that suits his department's funders, the Koch brothers.
realityinabox
realityinabox rated it 7 years ago
Very quick read, but an interesting perspective on the state of the current economy. I think he is correct in his analysis of the low-hanging-fruit, but think he lets the growing income inequality off a bit too easily. Even if I don't particularly like the idea of income redistribution, there has ...
EeeJay
EeeJay rated it 9 years ago
2.5After having read Freakonomics - this book doesn't have that much of an impact. The writing isn't as simple as I would like. Concepts introduced are done so using wording which doesn't clarify what the author means...
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