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Ursula K. Le Guin
As of 2013, Ursula K. Le Guin has published twenty-two novels, eleven volumes of short stories, four collections of essays, twelve books for children, six volumes of poetry and four of translation, and has received many awards: Hugo, Nebula, National Book Award, PEN-Malamud, etc. Her recent... show more
As of 2013, Ursula K. Le Guin has published twenty-two novels, eleven volumes of short stories, four collections of essays, twelve books for children, six volumes of poetry and four of translation, and has received many awards: Hugo, Nebula, National Book Award, PEN-Malamud, etc. Her recent publications include the novel Lavinia, an essay collection, Cheek by Jowl, and The Wild Girls. Forthcoming in 2012, Finding My Elegy, New and Selected Poems. She lives in Portland, Oregon.

She is known for her treatment of gender (The Left Hand of Darkness, The Matter of Seggri), political systems (The Telling, The Dispossessed) and difference/otherness in any other form. Her interest in non-Western philosophies is reflected in works such as 'Solitude' and 'The Telling' but even more interesting are her imagined societies, often mixing traits extracted from her profound knowledge of anthropology acquired from growing up with her father, the famous anthropologist, Alfred Krober. The Hainish Cycle reflects the anthropologist's experience of immersing themselves in new strange cultures since most of their main characters and narrators (Le Guin favours the first person narration) are envoys from a humanitarian organization, the Ekumen, sent to investigate or ally themselves with the people of a different world and learn their ways.
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Birth date: October 21, 1929
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Community Reviews
An Un-Calibrated Centrifuge
An Un-Calibrated Centrifuge rated it 4 weeks ago
Another from NPR's Backseat Bookshelf. The rating is solely because I don't like high fantasy (I do like low fantasy). I'm pretty sure this A Wizard of Earthsea is good since most people who do like high fantasy like Le Guin and the Earthsea series. If I wanted long descriptions of fantasy worlds...
Lillelara
Lillelara rated it 1 month ago
Has anyone of you watched the movie Avatar and thought the same thing as I did: “It´s worth watching the movie because of its visual style but the story is one of the lamest I ever had to sit through in a cinema.” Leave it to Ursula K. Le Guin to write almost the same story and make it an interestin...
Elentarri's Book Blog
Elentarri's Book Blog rated it 4 months ago
Interesting concept, but the execution fell a bit flat (or old fashioned - it was written in 1895). Central themes, besides the minor time-travel aspect, include how the social class divide and technological innovations have altered humanity. This book provides something to think about.
Musings/Träumereien/Devaneios
Musings/Träumereien/Devaneios rated it 5 months ago
"To light a candle, is to cast a shadow": Ursula K. Le Guin, 1929 – 2018Who now has the stature and respect to call out poseurs like Atwood and Ishiguru? Who is there who can be relied on to correct the lazy and meretricious? She led lead by example, not just in speeches or reviews. The world is poo...
Arbie's Unoriginally Titled Book Blog
UKL said she wanted to write about Europe but felt that as an American, she wouldn't be taken seriously if she did so - so she invented a central European country (Orsinia) in the hope that would allow her to get away with it. She set her first novel, Malafrena, there and talked about love and freed...
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