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Witold Rybczyński
Witold Rybczynski has written about architecture and urbanism for The New York Times, Time, The Atlantic, and The New Yorker. He is the author of the critically-acclaimed book Home and the award-winning A Clearing in the Distance. His latest book is The Biography of a Building. The recipient of... show more

Witold Rybczynski has written about architecture and urbanism for The New York Times, Time, The Atlantic, and The New Yorker. He is the author of the critically-acclaimed book Home and the award-winning A Clearing in the Distance. His latest book is The Biography of a Building. The recipient of the National Building Museum's 2007 Vincent Scully Prize, he lives with his wife in Philadelphia, where he is emeritus professor of architecture at the University of Pennsylvania. Read his blog at http://www.witoldrybczynski.com.
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Birth date: 1943-03-01
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Community Reviews
Elentarri's Book Blog
Elentarri's Book Blog rated it 6 years ago
A semi-detective story of tracking down the origin of the screwdriver and the screw. The book is well written and interesting, but has rather a lot of wood-working terms (i.e. names of tools) that I needed to look up.
Bettie's Books
Bettie's Books rated it 8 years ago
bookshelves: art-forms, published-2002, italy, paper-read, nonfiction, architecture, summer-2011, biography, travel Read on June 26, 2011 For one could not describe as perfect a building which was useful, but only briefly, or one which was inconvenient for a long time, or, being both durable and ...
Oliviate
Oliviate rated it 9 years ago
In one word? Handy. I was doing research for a manuscript, and this gave me all the information I needed and more. The tone was light and appealing, though at times I wished for a more coherent narrative timeline.
Myrto
Myrto rated it 10 years ago
Very well-written and researched. I really enjoyed reading this, though it took me awhile. These 19th century gentlemen certainly had fascinating lives. They just decided, "Well, I guess I'll learn some engineering," or "I guess I'll be an architect." And then they did, no four year degree required....
davidofterra
davidofterra rated it 10 years ago
I enjoyed this book but am reluctant to recommend it to others.
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